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Detective Pikachu photo
Detective Pikachu

Detective Pikachu movie catches a director


Still holding out hope for Danny Devito
Dec 01
// Nick Valdez
After a secret, yet massive bidding war, Legendary won the rights to produce a Pokemon related film. So they began moving forward with an adaptation of Great Detective Pikachu, a CG/live-action hybrid where a talking Pikachu ...
Moana  photo
Moana

Watch the fantastic "You're Welcome" from Disney's Moana


Thank you indeed
Nov 29
// Nick Valdez
If you didn't get to catch Disney's newest dynamo Moana over the Thanksgiving holiday, Disney has helpfully (and awesomely) given a little preview. Although I didn't get to gush about it as much as I wanted to in our review, ...

Review: Moana

Nov 23 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221047:43203:0[/embed] MoanaDirectors: John Musker and Ron ClementsRelease Date: November 23, 2016Rating: PG Moana follows the titular Moana (Auli’i Cravalho), a teenager who's always dreamed of traveling the seas beyond her island village, but is next in line for village chieftain and must stay home. When darkness begins rotting away her home, brought on when the demigod Maui (Dwayne Johnson) steals the heart of the ancient goddess Te Fiti, Moana must journey across the sea, find Maui and ask him for help, and return the Heart of Te Fiti from where it came. From its core, Moana is much different from Disney's other princess films. Choosing instead to follow Moana on a hero's journey, rather than a quest for love, the film allows for individual character development thanks to its simplicity. While this simplicity may mirror Disney's previous films a bit too much, it is honestly what makes Moana work as well as it does.  Directors Musker and Clements have experience creating lasting Disney legacies with the two of them directing hits like The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, and The Great Mouse Detective. Basically, these two are responsible for a good deal of your favorite Disney moments and it's the same with Moana. The film may share too many structural similarities with previous films because of their choices, but it's also sure to make up for that simplicity with a complex emotional through line and culture. It's what previous Disney Princess films had lacked, and it's what Frozen experimented with. With a simplified tale, the film allows the characters to add layers of depth. Instead of growing as a character in relation to another person, i.e when Ariel changes herself for Prince Eric, for example, Moana's tale is all about self-improvement. It's not complicated with extraneous plot like a third act twist villain or jokes from a cartoon sidekick, Moana instead sticks to its heart with its two central characters and builds everything around them.  Being a character first type of fairy tale, Moana trusts in its two stars to make it work. Thankfully, Dwayne Johnson and the awesomely talented newcomer, Auli’i Cravalho more than hold their own. Johnson as Maui is energetic and as charming as he ever is, but, coupled with Maui's slightly mischievous character design, now has a slight edge missing from some of Johnson's work. His song, "You're Welcome" is also fantastic. His single is definitely a standout with a blend of humor and musicality. But I don't think I'll ever be able to fully express how impressed I am by the young Auli’i Cravalho. You would never be able to tell, but as her first major starring role, Cravalho is an absolute delight. Once again marrying character design and performance, Cravalho makes Moana a believable kid. Moana is astonishingly the first Disney Princess to act like an actual young girl. She's awkward sometimes, but has an endearing moxie that characterized classic princesses like Mulan, Ariel, and Tiana. But unlike the other Princesses, Moana is allowed to have non-romantic flaws.  You're probably a bit worried since I keep comparing Moana to previous films, but it's entirely intentional. Musker and Clements intended to recapture the spirit of the 2D films. Every part of its production fully embraces nostalgia, while making sure to change enough to keep the film from repeating the past too much. Thanks to the phenomenal soundtrack from Lin-Manuel Miranda, Opetaia Foa'i, and Mark Mancina, every scene has just a bit more punch. The opening, for example, is kind of incredible. As the film introduces its setting and unique culture (as the Oceanic island culture is far more three dimensional than cultures seen in films past), its punctuated by an incredible chant-like song mirroring The Lion King's now prolific opening. While I'm not sure if its lead single's, "How Far I'll Go," contemporary style will outlast the Broadway appeal of its predecessor, it's still heart-opening. Jemaine Clement's surprise song performance is pretty great too, as it plays to his creepy wheelhouse. Also, the most beautiful song and performance overall is the ancestor song. I don't want to spoil it, but just trust that it's fantastic. But none of this character work or music would succeed without Moana's unbelievable visuals. Moana has Disney's most exemplary animation to date with its luscious landscape and gorgeous ocean animations. The setting itself is a main character, and somehow feels fantasical yet attainable. It's an island paradise capturing the mythical nature of its fairy tale, but also looks grounded enough to exist in our world. There's no skirting the Pacific Islander culture here, unlike the other Princess' films dilution of ethnicity. The character body design is diverse, with Moana herself looking less plastic and moving more fluidly than humans seen in Tangled or Frozen. Thanks to its full embrace of what makes it different, the story's complex emotion and culture seem simplistic. See? Full circle. It's simplicity by design. Blending its depth so well and sneaking in character development through song, I didn't realize how much I had experienced until I started writing this review. The only real problem I had with Moana overall was how some of its contemporary jokes and song arrangements (There's a Twitter reference and other meta jokes) betray the timeless quality of its setting, but honestly it's not that big of a deal. Moana is definitely one of the better theatrical experiences of 2016, and in a year full of strife, it's what we need right now.  Its nostalgic quality may turn some off of Moana, but the film is still incredibly fresh despite these parallels to the past. It's a Disney Princess film taking the successes of the past, fixes their problems, and injects a breath of life into Disney they haven't had for quite some time. Moana is for the child in you, your children, and even their children. And who knows? Moana may just go down as a "classic" years down the line. 
Moana Review photo
Hawaiian roller coaster ride
Disney Animation has had one critical success after another since they're in the middle of a new creative renaissance. Fully embracing CG animation, Disney has produced hits like Tangled, Wreck-It Ralph, Zootopia, and most im...

Cars 3 photo
Cars 3

This Cars 3 teaser trailer is short and awesome


It looks...good?
Nov 21
// Nick Valdez
Cars is overall the worst Pixar series to date, but maybe Pixar is pulling a Toy Story 3 with the third film? This teaser trailer for Cars 3 is short, but it hits quite harder than I'd expect. It's already better than the first two, but I'm waiting for the comedy shoe to drop.  Cars 3 releases June 16th next year. 

Kong: Skull Island photo
Kong: Skull Island

Watch the final Kong: Skull Island trailer for sweet giant monkey action


"No. It's pretty big, I guess..."
Nov 17
// Nick Valdez
With King Kong and Godzilla set to fight in 2020, Kong: Skull Island has to do quite a bit to set up Kong as a threat to to not only Godzilla, but nature itself. With this final trailer for the upcoming reboot/prequel, we're ...
Ghost in the Shell photo
Major-ly cool
Ghost in the Shell is shaping up to be an interesting project. An adaptation of Mamamune Shirow's manga, Ghost in the Shell stars Scarlett Johansson as Major Motoko Kusanagi, a cyborg policewoman who must help stop the latest...

YJ S3 photo
YJ S3

Young Justice returning for a third season


Nov 08
// Nick Valdez
For what is truly a victory for fans after years of online support, WB Animation has confirmed that Young Justice is indeed returning for a season three. The series ran from 2010-2013, as part of Cartoon Network's DC Nation b...
Voltron Live-Action photo
Voltron Live-Action

Universal working on live-action Voltron film


(still)
Nov 05
// Nick Valdez
Studios have wanted a live-action Voltron reboot for some time. Before being bought by Universal, Dreamworks Animation had been chugging away at a script for years. But now after their mild success from the Netflix show, Volt...
The Simpsons photo
The Simpsons

The Simpsons renewed for record breaking 30th season


Even I've got a limit
Nov 05
// Nick Valdez
From Season 13, episode 17, the clip show "Gump Roast":    Ullman shorts, Christmas show,Marge's fling, Homer's bro,Bart in well, Flanders fails,Whacking Snakes, Monorail,Mr. Plow, Homer sp...
LEGO Batman Movie photo
LEGO Batman Movie

Newest LEGO Batman Movie trailer is full of heart and clown snakes


Best bat yet, really
Nov 05
// Nick Valdez
The LEGO Movie was a revelation when it hit theaters two years ago. A fun film with a hearty message, it featured a breakout performance from Will Arnett's Batman. Now with a spin-off set in motion, we haven't heard much of t...
Power Rangers photo
Power Rangers

The Power Rangers reboot Megazord is a f**king mess


ugh
Nov 05
// Nick Valdez
The upcoming Power Rangers reboot may be releasing in five months, but we've only been shown one tiny teaser for it. When pressed about new footage at the NYCC panel, director Dean Isrealite stated they were saving a lot of t...

Review: Pokemon: The First Movie

Nov 03 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221011:43182:0[/embed] Pokemon: The First MovieDirectors: Kunihiko Yuyama and Michael HaigneyRating: GRelease Date: November 6, 1999 (USA); November 1, 2016 (special event re-release) When a group of scientists sucessfully clone an ancient pokemon known as Mew, the resulting super pokemon breaks loose and wreaks havoc. The super clone, Mewtwo (Philip Bartlett), now in search of a purpose, invites the strongest pokemon trainers to a mysterious island to battle him. Ash Ketchum (Veronica Taylor), together with his friends Misty (Rachael Lillis), Brock (Eric Stuart), and Pikachu, meet Mewtwo's challenge and soon figure out there's more to this pokemon than they realized.  First things first, The First Movie is incredibly brisk. Choosing not to overstay its welcome (if you don't include the Pikachu's Island Adventure short), it instead tightly focuses on developing its central antagonist. Mewtwo themself is well defined with a clear existential crisis (as they try to clear the clouds of their mind, not so subtly represented by the storm they whip up with their powers), and it's a greater deal of characterization than anyone else gets in the film. It's such a well put together back story, in fact, it's surprising The First Movie is able to explore as much thematic territory as it does. It ends up questioning the philosophy behind the Pokémon series in full as it briefly challenges the "fighting vs. battling" argument within the Poké world. The film doesn't get as deep as I would've hoped, as the argument gives way to a hokey climax, but this amount of self-awareness is impressive for a children's film.  The laser focus on Mewtwo may help the film's pace within its short run time (as it rarely goes on tangents), but it's hard to care about anyone else involved with the plot since they fail to get the same attention. Since the film assumes the audience has working knowledge of the Pokémon TV series, and it's a fair assumption given the branding, Ash and his friends (along with Team Rocket, introduced into the plot in a Rosencrantz/Gildenstern, outsider looking in fashion) don't really have a reason to be involved. Their usual schtick of wandering into a plot in motion may work for a TV series needing a fresh story every week, but it falls flat here. Along with introducing seemingly important ancillary characters (like the kidnapped Nurse Joy or the random lady who knows storms or something) only to serve no purpose, The First Movie fails to turn Ash into a compelling protagonist.  With no real personality of his own, Ash instead becomes a moral mouthpiece. His base love for his pokemon is exaggerated into a love for everything and grand declarations of peace. It's a far cry from an Ash who, just minutes before, was willing to pit his pokemon against Mewtwo. The First Movie betrays its emotional themes with its own world, really. It's greater desire to stop senseless violence goes against everything Pokémon is known for. So it's okay to use your pokemon to fight when they use their abilities? Since there's never a clear difference between how Mewtwo forces a fight and how trainers could force a fight, the overall moral is clouded. Rather than focus on, say, the friendship between trainers and their pokes (thus enhancing its narrative overall), the film goes with a generic message. It almost feels like a cop out.  But in the end, Pokémon: The First Movie makes up for its shortcomings with pure entertainment value. Once you get passed the cheesy dialogue (complete with puns and jokes that didn't age well in the slightest) and the murky themes (which I give the film credit for attempting), there are plenty of rewards in store. A well written antagonist, slick animation, and a score that includes the ironically lovable "Brother Against Brother" song.  No matter what score I put here, it literally doesn't matter. You love it, you hate it, you already had an opinion 18 years in the making. But it was great to confirm that I liked a good thing back then, instead of figuring out yet another product from my childhood was hot garbage. My critic brain may settle on "Good," but my nostalgic one adds about 30 points. 
Pokemon The First Movie photo
"...and we succeeded"
One weekend, too many years ago, I spent a night over at my aunt's place. She didn't have cable, but she had a VCR. Which meant I could watch any movie I brought with me when I was bored of doing dumb kid stuff. Not thinking ...

FFS: Victor & Valentino photo
FFS: Victor & Valentino

Cartoon Network's Victor & Valentino pilot is perfect for Day of the Dead


Nov 02
// Nick Valdez
It's a good time to be a cartoon fan. Now that Cartoon Network is currently experiencing a second quality boom following Adventure Time and Regular Show, they've been giving all sorts of creators unique opportunities to showc...
Snow White photo
Snow White

Disney is working on a live-action Snow White too


All live-action everything
Nov 01
// Nick Valdez
Since Disney figured out we're willing to spend the same amount of money on retreads (i.e. Maleficent, Cinderella, Pete's Dragon, and The Jungle Book) as we do on original ideas, the newest wave of giving every one of their a...
Rogue One Trailer photo
Gimme dat sweet Mads
The idea of getting a new Star Wars film every year might be overwhelming, but after checking out this final trailer for Rogue One, I don't think it's going to be a problem. With our best look at the film yet, I am completely...

NYCC: John Wick: Chapter Two takes place four days after the original

Oct 11 // Nick Valdez
If you were somehow worried the sequel wouldn't have the same amount of love as the original, there's no need to worry. One thing the panel highlighted was how much care was going into Chapter Two. Before the panel proper we were treated to a behind the scenes video showing off the film's stunt work (and a couple of the set pieces). Things I could skim from the video were another prominent car fight, and a bit more of that lobby and alleyway shootouts in the trailer. But the important fact is that each of these stunts is very real. Director Chad Stehelski emphasized the practicality of the effects and that each actor was put through the ringer in order for the film's action to feel as real as possible. Common even mentioned how this film is the most intense action he's been a part of (and after a look at his fight with Reeves, that's definitely an understatement). But the better part of the panel went into a good amount of juicy story details.  The best part of the first John Wick was the Continental Hotel, and it's making a return in the sequel. Ian McShane also noted how there's an Italian version of it and fighting through it leads to Wick killing "about 80 Italians." The specificity of the statement was a bit weird, but whatever it's all good. Keanu Reeves detailed the plot as such: When Wick first left the assassin world, he made a deal with someone in order to hide his existence completely (using the specific "blood oath" phrase). And as such, when returned to action he broke that oath and now someone is out to "cash in" on that deal. Not only does he have to deal with someone chasing him down, Reeves also teased a new mysterious organization called The High Table which may or may not be connected to the Continental. And the kicker? The sequel takes place just four days after the original film. John Wick gets no rest.  Other things of note are the new setting and new dog. The sequel is headed to Italy for stylish killing action, and director Stehelski couldn't confirm whether or not this new dog was going to be safe. It's a high point of contention for some people in the first one, but although he couldn't confirm whether or not the new dog was going to be safe he did say we'd like it. So, I'm sure this new doggo will be just fine. Maybe cutely falling asleep through everything or something.  That's all from Lionsgate's Power Rangers/John Wick: Chapter Two panel! The film releases next February and it's going to be a hell of a wait. 
John Wick 2 photo
More guns, more hotel, more...Italians?
Lionsgate had a weird, disjointed panel at New York Comic Con. With two properties that couldn't be more disparate.there wasn't a proper amount of hype or negativity. Thankfully after Power Rangers' lackluster showing, John W...

NYCC: Power Rangers might be both fun and boring

Oct 11 // Nick Valdez
First thing's first, we did get a few key bits of info that my fan brain was able to parse out. One thing the cast seemed to emphasize at the panel was the fact they had to do a lot of stunt work themselves, which is great (and what I wanted all along). RJ Cyler (Billy) had a pretty fun anecdote about how he learned how to do an "axe kick" from his stuntman. So this at least confirms that we'll be seeing them fight outside of suits, but if the trailer is anything to go by, these fights are most likely mixes of martial arts and superpowers. As for the Zords, we still didn't get a look at them as it seemed that the teaser trailer was really all that was ready to show off for now. It's a little lame but I get not wanting to release it all early.  My biggest concern going forward, however, is how well this cast will work together. At the panel they were telling stories of how much they bonded as a group, but their behavior told a different story. They seemed stiff around each other with no natural chemistry. In fact, the only ones happy to be there were the previously mentioned RJ Cyler and Becky G (Trini), who not only color coordinated their outfits but also are the only experienced actors in the teenage cast. It didn't help matters when the host clearly didn't understand what was going on, so there was no push for more stories of their time on set together. The last bit of new info is both director Dean Isrealite and Elizabeth Banks mentioned Goldar and the Putty Patrol. Not a hard confirmation, but it's good to know these characters will be back in some regard.  But since they thought the teaser was good enough to show twice, I might as well breakdown some things here. As I mentioned in that post, I'm a little torn. After spending some time away from it and the fan bubble, I've come to realize a few things. I'm not sure what I expected, but I totally forgot Lionsgate is the reason Young Adult books made so much money. The Hunger Games, Twilight, they all play a part here. While the opening logos promise a rainbow colored adventure (even spilling out into the first shot of the trailer with Jason and his red car,  and yellow, pink and blue bikes), the rest of the film gives way to the same grim color palette the rest of the Young Adult films have. But in a weird way, this totally works when stuff like the power coins are highlighted. While the overly dark lighting might get tiresome, maybe the colors will pop more. Sort of a silver lining situation. But that's pretty much where the positives end. I'm thinking this reboot, an origin story as the trailer confirms, is going to be both fun and boring. As evidenced by the Breakfast Club like setup (where a bunch of latchkey kids come together in detention, including a red ranger wearing a house arrest anklet), these kids are meeting other for the first time before bonding over becoming superheroes. While I don't like their Spider-Man esque powers (complete with the Tobey Macguire "look I have abs now" scene), I get it. Power Rangers has always been about regular people who get caught up in irregularity, and it's been done in the series proper, but this direction only works when the characters are defined well. If you remember, it took the original show sixteen episodes of team building before it could tell an actual story ("Green With Evil"). I'm also guessing that's why we've seen so little of the Ranger action as of yet. Which is a shame since that's what is going to separate the movie from all the other boring teen films.  The most grim prediction I can make regarding this tease is that we're only going to get about 15-20 minutes of them in the actual suits. At least the panel confirmed that the suits are physical (with CG enhancements, most likely), but I'm sure most of this origin is going to be spent getting to know these kids since the film doesn't have the luxury of getting 22 mins of air time every weekend. At least it looks like they'll free Rita when they nab the power coins. Since there's an image of her trapped in some kind of rock, I'm assuming it's the same the rock Billy blows up in the trailer. It'd be neat to connect Rita directly to the Rangers that way.  Overall, I am a bit disappointed with the way the NYCC panel went down. Once I took off my fan hat, and put on my critical one however, I did ease up. But not by much. As always, I remain highly skeptical. I don't like some of the changes to the story, but I do like some of the changes it brings (the fact Rita can say "kill" instead of "destroy" is a huger deal than we're making out of it). And it seems the trailer is doing a lot to grab non-fans of the series, which is always a huge plus. I just don't want to watch a series of movies I dislike, so I hope these can be good. Then again, since this could have been much worse I'll take what I can get.  Oh yeah, don't expect the Green Ranger anytime soon. 
Power Rangers NYCC photo
Goldar and the Puttys are a comin'
There was only one panel I was looking forward to during New York Comic this year, and it's been a long wait for it. On Saturday, Lionsgate held a dual panel featuring both Power Rangers and John Wick: Chapter Two. Suffice to...

John Wick 2 photo
"Yeah, I'm thinking I'm back!"
John Wick was one of the biggest surprises of 2014. What looked like a B movie starring Keanu Reeves turned out to be one of the most confident and competent action films of the last few years. Flixist as a whole has been loo...

Power Rangers photo
After 10,000 years...
So it's a bit earlier than planned and it's definitely taken the wind out of my sails in more ways than one. But here's the first Power Rangers reboot trailer. I'm not sure what to think. At first watch, it's pretty generic b...

NYCC 2016 photo
Cons bring all the nerds to the yard
Like every other year before, New York Comic Con is underway and Flixist is there to check it out for you. We're doing a little better this year since we already have a bigger crew, and we've got some cool stuff lined up for ...

Review: Shin Godzilla

Sep 30 // Nick Valdez
[embed]220931:43124:0[/embed] Shin GodzillaDirectors: Hidaeki Anno and Shinji HiguchiRated: NRRelease Date: October 11th, 2016  Much like the original Godzilla (or Gojira) film released in 1954, Shin Godzilla is a natural disaster film through a political thriller lens. When a giant, radioactive monster suddenly rises out the sea and wanders through Tokyo, the Japanese government discusses how to handle the situation. But the focus is on the one lone dissenter, Rando Yaguchi (Hiroki Hasegawa), the Deputy Chief who's more interested in saving as many people as possible rather than rise through the political ranks. As he leads a task force, he must now work with the Japanese government members who have their own agendas, an American government with their own ideas as to how to handle the problem (both metaphorically and narratively), and of course, a giant monster slowly getting deadlier as time rolls on.  As you can gauge from the synopsis, Shin Godzilla is light on Godzilla action. It's reflective of that old school Toho mentality where Godzilla is merely a disaster punctuating the human drama. But unlike the similar criticism used against Edwards' Godzilla in 2014, this film makes sure each of those short bursts is treated with the appropriate amount of weight. When Godzilla attacks, or better yet walks, the action is grounded. You see citizens actively reacting to the monster and even witness some of their downfalls. When this Godzilla tears through a building, there's a sense that each of those buildings is populated. Like the film, Godzilla itself moves in a direct way. Using a traditional suit highlighted by CG also helps the titular kaiju feel real. There is an attention to detail that's been missing from the series for quite some time. It's part of the reason the new design is so effective as well. This "Shin" Godzilla radiates with bright reds and oranges, and I've never seen the series' radioactive fire breath be more effective. Watching deep purples giving way to the trademark blue flame crawling up through Godzilla's tail and then out of its mouth is honestly badass.  But the problem with having such a well thought out, weighted Godzilla is the absence felt when not on screen. By leaning so heavily into a political thriller, directors Anno and Higuchi bet everything on human drama. The main problem with this angle, however, is the political stuff isn't all that interesting. There are vague hints of government members who are making decisions in order to protect their own interests, but it neither helps build the world nor is relevant to the overall plot. The attention to detail also works against the team here as a lot of time is spent explaining minor details like evacuation plans or devoted to following down a chain of command as they issue orders. Leading to much of the dialogue feeling like wasted time. To their credit, Anno and Higuchi do their best to make the dialogue heavy scenes easy to digest. Much of the dialogue is framed through quick cuts (leading to these weird moments when characters speak directly to the camera), and little jokes give some of the members much needed personality. But it's not until the titular monster fully evolves does the film choose to evolve as well. Much like the 1954 original, Shin Godzilla is a thinly (then not so thinly) veiled metaphor for nuclear weapons. But before settling on the same commentary on the subject the series has been known for (making for a weak conclusion), directors Anno and Higuchi slip in some experimental commentary never seen in this series. For one, there are several direct references to America's vision of Godzilla. From its name change, as this film adopts "Godzilla" over the traditional "Gojira," to ridiculing American blockbusters' penchant for big, loud solutions to their problems. But oddly enough as the two ridicule Western film making sensibilities, a lot of its themes are adopted here. When the film works best, it lauds itself with a Japanese nationalism mirroring much of American disaster films. The "united we stand" mentality carries the film through its climax and eventually gives way to a cool "rah rah" moment. Which makes it all the more confusing when it reverts back to a somber, "nuclear weapons are bad" tone.  In the end, Shin Godzilla has me torn. While I appreciate a return to the series' deep thematic roots, the film is at its best when it flirts with ideas outside of the norm. It's a clash of old school Toho and modern monster movie filmmaking that ultimately leaves a lot to be desired by film's end. But at the end of the day, Shin Godzilla accomplishes what Toho set out to do. This new Godzilla is fearsome as it is toothsome. It simply beats out the American version with just the fire breath alone.  Regardless of what Toho decides to do with this new Godzilla series moving forward, I'll be there to watch it happen. 
Shin Godzilla Review photo
Godzilla got busy
When Gareth Edwards' take on Godzilla failed to light up screens here in the U.S., Godzilla's parent company, Toho, took the reboot as kind of an insult. Vowing to reclaim their famous monster, Toho unveiled a striking new de...

Fantastic Beasts photo

Now that Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is a little over a month away expect to see more and more of it leading into its November release. When you see the trailer, these are probably your immediate thoughts: 1. "Fan...

Lion King photo
Lion King

Disney working on live-action The Lion King remake


Nasaawhenya
Sep 28
// Nick Valdez
As pretty much everyone guessed after seeing Jon Favreau's technical marvel, The Jungle Book, Disney is indeed moving forward with a live-action adaptation of the animated classic, The Lion King.  Confirming on their web...
The Simpsons photo
The Simpsons

You're not ready to watch 600 episodes of The Simpsons in a row


FXX's second "Every Simpsons Ever"
Sep 23
// Nick Valdez
When Fox first launched its spin-off channel, FXX, back in 2014, we were treated with an "Every Simpsons Ever" marathon. A week long event that showed the 552 episode long series in full. Now topping that is their second mara...
Power Rangers photo
Power Rangers

Bill Hader cast as Alpha 5 for the Power Rangers reboot


Sep 22
// Nick Valdez
To go along with the news of a New York Comic Con panel, first look at the zords, Elizabeth Banks as Rita, and Bryan Cranston as Zordon, is the coolest bit of news yet. Announced on Twitter, Bill Hader is joining the Power Ra...
Power Rangers photo
Power Rangers

Check out these new, goofy Power Rangers movie posters


Coming to NYCC!
Sep 21
// Nick Valdez
Power Rangers may be hitting theaters in a little over six months, but I feel like I've been waiting for it forever. Make fun all you want, but it's a big deal for me and a lot of  folks my age.  Along with the...
Fifty Shades Darker photo
Fifty Shades Darker

Here's the darker trailer for Fifty Shades Darker


Fifty Shades Danker
Sep 15
// Nick Valdez
I read the trilogy, I reviewed the original film, and now I'm here to tell you about Fifty Shades Darker. There's honestly not much to say about it. It has the same look as the first one, has the same lack of chemistry its tw...
Moana Trailer photo
Oh my gosh.
With as good of a roll Disney has been on lately, I've seen many people joke along the lines of "I will push children out of the way to see this" and for the first time, I completely agree. While this newest trailer gives awa...

Black Lightning photo
Black Lightning

DC's Black Lightning coming to TV, but not on The CW


Sep 09
// Nick Valdez
As we've reiterated many times in the past, what WB/DC can't seem to do in their films they've been excelling at on TV. One major player has been producer Greg Berlanti, who pretty much reinvented DC on TV with Arrow, The Fla...
Live By Trailer photo
Live By Trailer

Trailer for Ben Affleck's Live By Night tears through the prohibition era


Sep 09
// Nick Valdez
Ben Affleck's currently in a sort of revival. He may have take some hits in the 2000s, but it all changed in the 2010s with The Town. With a trio of successful directorial outings (Gone Baby Gone, The Town, and Argo), he's we...

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