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Rick Lash

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Hellboy: Rise of the Blood Queen is Rated-R; director Neil Marshall nods thanks to Deadpool, Logan


R-Rated comic movies make bank, bruh.
Jun 28
// Rick Lash
Hellboy reboot director Neil Marshall was recently spinning philosophical regarding his take on on the Hellboy material. He aims to take the good from former director Guillermo del Torro's take, and then make it much bloodier...
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Kevin Bacon has worms: Syfy brings back TV Tremors reboot


No, seriously, Bacon has worms.
Jun 27
// Rick Lash
Because Hollywood is essentially a seething heap of worms mindlessly burrowing through recycled soil looking for fresh fodder, we're getting a second Syfy Tremors reboot, but this time with bacon! Kevin Bacon will reprise the...
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Director Matt Reeves confirms Ben Affleck is still Bostonian Batman


"I'm Batman. ... Still. ... Probably."
Jun 27
// Rick Lash
Because the world wants Flixist to create a true clusterfuck label, here we go again. If one searches back through our Ben Affleck Flixist timeline, one finds the following posts: April 13, 2016, Ben Affleck directing, ...
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Pitch Perfect 3 premieres 1st trailer; likely features women singing--Do-Re-Mi!


Jun 26
// Rick Lash
And there's your daily does of human being with its arm up to the shoulder in cow butt. You're welcome! As noted when Pitch Perfect 3 dropped poster art a few days ago, I'm a fan of the series. That's a precursor to everythin...

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Pitch Perfect 3 has picture perfect poster: Last Call Pitches


Jun 24
// Rick Lash
Pitch Perfect has been an unexpectedly enjoyable franchise. It's irreverent, yet stays on point, and by and large does a wonderful job of staying in the realm of comedy while still having a story (as non-earth shattering as i...
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Jurassic World 2 is Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom


When do the dinos get machine guns?
Jun 23
// Rick Lash
Jurassic World's Twitter account--yes--it has a Twitter account--took to the internet to proclaim to the world, in 140 characters or less: "Hear ye! Hear ye! Our second act, not being the first, shall be titled and known, fro...
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Saw 8 has title: Jigsaw ... comes with weird puzzley graphic


Charlie Brown: An 8th Saw-Oh good grief!
Jun 21
// Rick Lash
Because Hollywood is the land of opportunity [read: a complete and utter lack of originality] and audiences are so nuanced of taste and subtly responsive to the creative processes of their filmmakers [read: sheeple who will w...
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Star Wars Han Solo spinoff directors get the Donald Trump goodbye: You're fired!


Should have seen this coming
Jun 21
// Rick Lash
News broke yesterday that the writer-directors of the forthcoming Star Wars Han Solo spinoff prequel were leaving the project. But things aren't always as they seem. The day began as any other for Phil Lord and Chris Miller. ...
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Scarlett Johansson says Avengers: Infinity War will have scene with 32 characters


Avengers: Royal Rumble?
Jun 20
// Rick Lash
Scarlett Johansson, aka Scar-Jo, aka The Crimson Swedishman visited The Late Show with Stephen Colbert to promote her Rough Night (as rough as it proclaims; read all about it!). And somewhere along the way, fan...
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Daddy's Home 2 gets trailer, Mel Gibson, and hopefully not a single hot tub


Jun 16
// Rick Lash
A Flixist team member who shall remain anonymous perhaps said it best: "How did [Daddy's Home] get a sequel?" It's a question we imagine many of you have said on more than one occasion. Don't deny it. It's OK. We've all ...
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Your homeboys, Winnie da Pooh, Tigger, Yore, an Lil Roo get a trailer in Goodbye Christopher Robin


Jun 16
// Rick Lash
If you've ever wondered, 'What crazy son of a bitch invented these talking stuffed animals that are obsessed with fly honeys and terrified of heffalumps and woozles,' you're in luck my friend! Fox Searchlight Pictures UK brings you the unadulterated true story of Winne the Pooh creator A.A. Milne and how he stole the idea from his kid and never gave him a dime. I know: f'd up. Peep the trailer.

Review: 47 Meters Down

Jun 16 // Rick Lash
[embed]221613:43604:0[/embed] 47 Meters DownDirector: Johannes RobertRelease Date: June 16, 2016Rated: PG-13 By and large, director Johannes Robert managed this film masterfully. Little is wasted, and most stays true to form. The opening title sequence of a dark, ominous underwater scene proves to be the inside of a swimming pool. And one girl overturns another on a raft, causing a glass of wine to hit water and spread in pure imitation of blood. It’s one of the few times the director gets too heavyhanded: we know it’s a shark movie; no portent necessary. It’s then that we’re introduced to sisters Lisa (Mandy Moore) and Kate (Claire Holt). Lisa’s the stick in the mud whose boyfriend has left her because she’s too boring, while Kate’s the sort to tell her sister to get over it by banging the first bar fly she can find their side of the border in Mexico. When said bar fly recommends the sisters go cage diving with great white sharks, our story is set in motion. Writer Anthony Jaswinski admits the film follows the 127 Hours format—he means that you’re predominantly with one (or in this case, two) character for the duration, after some early introductions. But the similarities don’t end there; the format also calls for a sticky situation to keep your character alone, and we’re quickly provided one when the cage the girls go diving in proves to be of less than reliable quality and ends up on the ocean’s floor. That’s the premise. The cage is separated from boat. There are hungry, 25-foot sharks in the water. And our sisters are stuck in said cage with limited air supply. The film’s stars have said that this is not just a shark movie; it’s more than that. It’s a movie about being stuck at sea. This is true. It’s not just a shark movie; it’s really a movie that draws on and capitalizes on the many primal fears inherent in mankind: fear of being adrift at sea; fear of being adrift and immersed at sea; fear of the unknown (either under the water, or in the dark); fear of drowning; fear or suffocation; fear of being trapped; the fear of the immensity of everything else versus your own insignificance; fear of being at the mercy of forces greater than you; fear of being eaten alive. Where The Shallows began, 47 Meters Down continues, and ups the ante, allowing murphy’s law to dictate events. In an underwater cage surrounded by massive sharks? The cage will fail and leave you stranded. Have air tanks? Your supply is low. Have radios in rebreathers? You will be out of range. Reconnect the cage to a winch? The cable will fail. Get extra air tanks? You will face sharks. You get the idea. It’s a litany of what can go wrong, will go wrong, to the point where it borders on association with torture porn. These girls cannot catch a break, up until the film’s conclusion. And maybe not even then. The twists and turns deserve to remain in tact, in the dark, for you to enjoy unspoiled. But what can safely be said is that 47 Meters Down plays on your worst fears and delivers psychological terror. I had to detach myself to the ninth degree to watch it passively in order to write about it now. But if you allow yourself to be immersed in the dark of the theater, you’ll find yourself helplessly dragged in the film’s jaws, kicking and screaming, for the duration. The emotions are real; both Moore and Hoult spent more time underwater filming than is normal, and it reads. Robert directed them from above the water’s surface and had underwater crew on a different radio channel so that only he could communicate with the girls. They got a small taste of what they portrayed, and this was captured wonderfully and transcribed expertly. While, as noted, this is a shark film, the director must know the material well; where other films would get lost in the violence, Robert uses tension to perfection, and deaths, when they come, are impactful, but not focused on, and the tension is instantly restrung, meaning that you’re never quite off the hook. With few miscues—an unnecessary camera spin in one ascending shott--the film succeeds independently of the its sister film from 2016—even if you’ve seen The Shallows, you should still see 47 Meters Down.
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Measures Up
47 Meters Down is a shark movie—if shark movie is a genre. No, not the campy, so-good-they’re-bad shark movies we’ve been getting for a decade and a half now [ask anyone I know—my favorite of these is ...

Review: Rough Night

Jun 16 // Rick Lash
[embed]221612:43603:0[/embed] Rough NightDirector: Lucia AnielloRelease Date: June 16, 2016Rated: R Rough Night is the story of four college friends who promise to always be there for each other, and of how life sometimes has a way of getting in the way of the best laid plans. Jess (Scarlett Johansson) is a state politician of some sort (or on her way to becoming one) and is also getting married. Alice (Jillian Bell) is her overeager friend planning her bachelorette party. The gang is rounded out by Blair (Zoe Kravitz) and Frankie (Ilana Glazer). Oh, and then there’s Pippa (Kate McKinnon), Jess’s college friend from semester abroad, and a convenient Aussie accent to add to the mix. The friends convene in Miami for shenanigans, but, after drinking, weed, coke, puking, and penis shaped paraphernalia, things go awry with the arrival of a male stripper. If you’ve seen the film’s marketing, you may be aware of what comes next. I was, and I’ll admit that I was quite curious about how writer / director Lucia Aniello intended to deal with this twist. SPOILER ALERT: the stripper is killed; another senseless victim of bachelorette party extravagance and overindulgence. It was obvious from the same marketing, that the film wasn’t going to hide from this plot point: it was going to own it. This movie might even revolve around the death of a stripper: it’s, at the very least, the major plot point development in the movie. Stripper-based humor and even dead stripper humor is nothing new, and yes, it’s refreshing that the tables are turned here, reversing what have become standard gender roles: all good—like I said, I was really curious how this would be dealt with, as it’s a bit dark for comedy dealing with a bachelor / bachelorette scenario. Unfortunately, the answer is, poorly. Going back to that fine line between a rough night and a my life is over night, this moment is clearly filmed as the later. Aniello never makes light of the seriousness of what’s happening, while it’s happening. The music shifts, the action plays out all to graphically and convincingly, and I, for one, found myself wondering if this was actually a comedy, or was going to reveal itself to be quite a dark drama disguised under opening volleys of laughter and comedic humor. Thankfully, mercifully, it is a comedy, and the seriousness given to a woman accidentally killing a man in a moment quite reminiscent of the defining murder from Unfaithful (in which Gere slams a snow globe over a man’s head, killing him). They’re visceral deaths, blood is not spared, and they’re not humorous, in any sense. It’s jarring, to go from jokes about swimming in a sea of dicks, to involuntary manslaughter, and back to dick jokes (putting dick-nose sunglasses on the corpse to cover its creepy, dead eyes). The theater became quite silent when it happened. People were groaning and turning away even. Like I say, we are not in the midst of a drama, it’s a comedy, and after Jess and gang make every wrong decision you might possibly make in their situation, we’re steered back towards comedy. But it’s always a little off from that moment on. It’s irreconcilable how the characters react to having taken a life, through that jarring transition, to how they deal with the body and crack light of it afterwards—not enough time has elapsed, consequences are still unfolding rather quickly in rather frightening, real terms (as Blair calls her criminal defense lawyer slash uncle and learns that by moving the body and altering the crime scene they’re commiting serious crimes—no shit—but they are all on drugs and booze, so understandable). It would be OK, if this were a dark comedy and this was just the moment where it goes dark--but it's clearly not. It’s not that there’s something wrong with characters forgetting what’s morally center, or committing crimes and laughing about it, it’s the inconsistency of mood from Act I (weekend away in Miami) to the Turning Point (Stripper’s head is cracked on fireplace hearth before he bleeds out) to Act II (disposing of the body and consequences). They just don’t gel. And, to be fair, if one of the Hangover films had dealt with the guys killing a stripper and then going through the emotional impact of what that really means immediately after, that wouldn’t have been funny either. Those characters do incredibly stupid things, highly illegal things, and do sometimes face unnervingly real consequences, but it never goes full dark comedy. It finds the line, hugs it, and then drunkenly walks it just well enough to pass the sobriety test (there’s a great scene in Rough Night dealing with one of these moments—more on that later). There's just something about cleaning a crime scene, and toweling up liters of blood, as a musical montage that didn't quite work. In another film sure to draw comparisons, Weekend at Bernie’s (and its eponymous sequel), we don’t get too real. The protagonists never deal with Bernie’s body voiding the contents of its bowels and how the guys deal with that while cops and potential witnesses linger nearby. Rough Night delivers laughs, don’t get me wrong. Act I is full of them. Bell and Glazer are at their usual best and do not disappoint. Clearly, pairing them with their known collaborator and director of Broad City was a win-win. It’s their standard best. Kate McKinnon is also great in her role as outsider, bringing just the right amount of wrong throughout. Johansson is more inhibited by her role as (maybe) uptight-wannabe-politician; she’s never able to fully break loose of her character role to sling banter with the comedic regulars. She does her best in whoo girl moments, but her biggest wins are born from clever writing that pokes fun at tiny everyday moments like a politician’s forced smile in a political TV spot and the difficulty in holding it naturally; or in great post-coke snorting tirades. In fairness, her character is a passive one, who’s more out there friends take actions that dictate her own; in American Pie terminology, she’s the Kevin of the group. One of her more genuine comedic moments may have been when the movie opens in full-on college flashback with the four friends gathered around a beer pong table. It’s a fun scene, one carefully reconstructed from a college frat house a decade passed as they even have J-Kwon’s Tipsy playing in the background. Let’s be clear, it was humorous, in of itself, to see Johansson, Glazer, Bell, and Kravitz pretending to be college-aged. Kravitz is great, perhaps seeming more natural than in other turns (the Divergent series, Fantastic Beasts), but isn’t able to flex true comedic muscles as her role is relegated to satiating an odd plotline with some hedonistic locals (and a random cameo from Demi Moore). Then too, there’s an unexpected parallel series of events unfolding as Jess’s fiancé, Peter (Paul Downs, co-writer) has an incredibly mild “bachelor party.”These asides to the men enjoying a quiet wine tasting, or Peter and co. buying adult diapers (for a reason I won’t spoil) are pleasantly interjected in a way as to add levity to the seriousness of unfolding events in Miami where people are literally dying. These deft touches, throwing convention on its head, or alluding to those things we all know to be true (a drunk girl bursting into the flashback college dorm room to pee on the floor--something she does on a weekly basis), are the bread and butter here and in earlier successes from this team--successes that have made Broad City and all associated with it so wildly popular. It’s a stellar cast being directed by a comedic powerhouse based off a script by that same powerhouse and her writing partner: it’s not unfair to expect great things, and they do deliver laughs, and a good number. There’s just one hell of a downer right in the middle of it; a downer that sours half the movie.    
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Dead Stripper > Dick Jokes
Maybe I should have taken a cue from the title. After all, Rough Night is fairly self-explanatory. I'm a fan of irreverent comedies where protagonists can behave the way less ideal versions of ourselves might, all with n...

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Jessica Chastain to play villain in Dark Phoenix X-Men flick


Real news: they've re-hired full cast
Jun 15
// Rick Lash
Jessica Chastain is in talks to portray a villain in the next installment of the X-Men series. Not confirmed. Villain is perhaps Lilandra, the empress of an alien empire called the Shi’ar, but also not confirmed. W...
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Venom not a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe: sad face


Jun 14
// Rick Lash
Venom, aka Tom Hardy wears a bodycon suit in Times Square for tips, will not be a part of Marvel's Cinematic Universe. That's according to to producer and President of Marvel Studios, Kevin Feige. According to Feige, "There i...
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Flatliners reboot is a thing: shiny new undead trailer, poster


Do not resusitate?
Jun 13
// Rick Lash
Flatliners has been revived. Someone failed to note the DNR checked box on the back of it's 1990, expired driver's license and gave it a few thousand volts from a defibrillator. You're welcome. Because it's been 27 years and ...
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47 Meters Down released a trailer a month ago: who knew?


Shark Movie! Summer Shark Movie!
Jun 13
// Rick Lash
Really, this movie is so little on the radar that its trailer got no PR and had been out for a month before I saw a spot watching the NBA Finals (widely known fact that basketball fans love shark movies nearly as much as they...
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Jerry Bruckheimer says no Johnny Depp, no Pirates of the Caribbean


Fools! James Hook IS Neverland!s
May 27
// Rick Lash
Right on the heels of yours truly proclaiming that "I imagine this franchise isn’t going anywhere ... perhaps one day we will get another actor to play Jack Sparrow," Jerry Bruckheimer, franchise mega-producer, came out...

Review: Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell no Tales

May 26 // Rick Lash
[embed]221557:43576:0[/embed] Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No TalesDirectors:  Joachim Rønning and Espen SandbergRelease Date: May 26, 2017Rated: PG-13 Both Will Turner (Orlando Bloom) and Elizabeth Swann (Kiera Knightly) have been absent from the franchise since At World’s End, so it may come as a surprise that the first character we meet, a young boy and expert on the sea’s supernatural lore, actually turns out to be their progeny. The opening scene quickly puts him in touch with Orlando Bloom, but my gut worried, watching it play out, that Orlando wasn’t really back for the film, more as a cameo—a nod to the Pirates glory days, and I didn’t expect to see him again until the film’s conclusion. Sadly, this proved true. But this sequence informs us of the driving narrative need of the film: Will Turner’s son, Henry Turner (Brenton Thwaites) wants to break his father’s curse that binds him to the Flying Dutchman, the ship that Will inherited from Davey Jones, and prevents Will from returning to his family. Let’s be clear about this, while Depp and Rush, in faithful turns as Captains Sparrow and Barbosa, carry the film, their narrative needs do not. This story is not theirs; it’s a story driven by a new, younger generation, Thwaites and Kaya Scodelario (Carina Smyth), and their mutual quest to find the Trident of Poseidon, the only object powerful enough to break all the sea’s curses. This is a problem, to a degree structurally, as Depp and Rush are there to support Thwaites and Scodelario, but the opposite plays out onscreen. Depp and Rush remain instrumental to not only the story, but the heart of the film. Their characters are fully developed, have history and depth, lending weight to what happens. While our new characters are not as emotionally resonant, despite admirable attempts to add depth in the brief time allotted by the script. Scodelario shines as a smart woman immersed in heavy colonial ignorance, whose education, drive, and intelligence are quickly branded and trumped by labels of “witch” at every turn to effective fanfare and laughs. But this imbalance in story and reality carries further. Sparrow particularly, goes through the motions without clear motivation. He’s drinking, wenching, and getting in and out of trouble with the same brilliance-come-ineptitude he always does, but here he has no drive and seems simply along for the ride. One can only assume because a Pirates movie without Depp / Jack Sparrow would not be a Pirates movie—a fact producers must have admitted, despite Depp’s box office woes, massive losses for another Disney vehicle (The Lone Ranger), and owing to his massive pay day for this turn. Javier Bardem plays the villain, Captain Salazar, to appropriate levels of villainy, but in this, he and his crew are weak, third iterations of undead pirate miscreants. They seem very much par for the course, and are feared, inexplicably, by men who have faced the same and worse in Pirates films past. What adds a fresh ocean breeze are the infusion of undead gulls and, particularly, sharks—a nice expansion of the undead monkey theme (little Jack does make his own appearance, to useful purpose as well). Similarly, it’s the undead pirates’ walking and running across the water’s surface (very much biblical in allusion) adding a nice correlation to the pirates from the original when they “take a walk” underwater. In many ways, what works best here is what has always worked for the franchise (including Hans Zimmer’s wonderful orchestral and epic score). The same can be said for the film’s over the top action sequences and elaborate stunts. Almost zany in nature, the stunts are as true to the franchise as ever. And, as usual, they are made to work through humor and well placed gags and jokes. The film is funny, I found myself laughing often, partly just in plain appreciation for the continuation of what made earlier Pirates films successful—and here Dead Men Tell no Tales may even succeed more than some of the other sequels. It is quite funny. The audience I viewed it with were laughing more than many audiences at pure comedies. It was hearty, and again, appreciative. Carina’s misfortune at having studied astronomy and horology (the study of time) are used wonderfully for extended bits. There’s probably room for a more meritorious review to dive deep into the depths of how female protagonists in these films are sexualized, reduced to heaving bosoms (albeit heaving bosoms that continually outmaneuver and perform their male counterparts), and stereotypes quite aware of their misfortune of living in the age they do. And there’s probably something to say regarding how these heroines are denied true independence as men continually feel the need to sacrifice themselves on their behalf, denying them their own narrative decision making power. But we’ll only hint that this imagined meritorious review can do this, and better—for we are not said review. Directors Joachim Rønning and Espen Sandberg purportedly tried to emulate Gore Verbinski’s directing of the first three films, and you do feel it here, but the heart they tried to infuse is meek and only succeeds by forced inclusions of plot developments that seem tacked on and don’t serve the majority of the movie. Here, see twists on why exactly this new female protagonist, Scodelario, has been introduced. Or what exactly happens when Will Turner’s curse is lifted, as you must come to expect will come to pass. What succeeds is what has always succeeded, and here, in film five, with apparent plans for more, pending the financial success or failure of the latest (by no means guaranteed given a $230M production budget), I imagine this franchise isn’t going anywhere. To me, seeing new characters come and go to flesh these vessels out while the underlying bones remain the same is reminiscent of the James Bond franchise; perhaps one day we will get another actor to play Jack Sparrow (though they successfully prove they can CGI him younger here), as unimaginable as that seems, and the franchise will reinvent itself by progression. Let’s just hope Johnny Depp and Disney learn from Sean Connery’s mistakes—once you’re out, you’re out: don’t come back.
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18 pound balls
It’s been nearly 14 years since audiences were first treated to Johnny Depp’s Captain Jack Sparrow. At the time, Roger Ebert said that Depp’s “performance is original in its every atom. There has ...

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HBO's Game of Thrones Season 7 has a real trailer, finally


7.16 HBO and I are gonna Netflix & chill
May 25
// Rick Lash
While HBO released a teaser spot for Game of Thrones season 7 two months ago, it was more of a narrative reminder of what's to come based off of existing soundbites. No new footage was revealed. This was a problem for the rab...
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Spider-Man: Homecoming has new poster and trailer, is clusterf@%k


Movie Poster 101
May 25
// Rick Lash
Marvel Studios and Sony and Disney and Columbia Pictures and whomever else is distributing Spider-Man: Homecoming have released a new poster to promote the film's release, and while others might say "it's not very good,"...
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Tom Cruise: Top Gun Sequel is on like Donkey Kong


Topper Gun. Top Gunnest. The Top Gun.
May 24
// Rick Lash
Though industry rags (yes you, Variety) have yet to run with this blasphemy, reputable rags like USA Today are reporting on the revelation that aired on some little known news program from ... and let me confirm I'm getting t...
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Universal unveils Dark Universe cast, logo, and Russell Crowe voiceover


May 23
// Rick Lash
We’ve known since 2014 that Universal wanted a piece of this super hot ‘cinematic universe’ (©Marvel) action. It’s all the rage. After all, they’re friggin’ UNIVERSAL—how could t...
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This guy is this guy--not a real stretch
Last we heard on the Venom movie front, Andrew Garfield was still the defacto Spider-Man, Spider-Man had not shown up in the Marvel cinematic universe, and Sony had not learned it was more lucrative to play nice with Marvel t...

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Friends. Countrymen. Britons. There are so many places (read: quips) I’d like to begin. From the guy who dated an already older-ish Madonna. Comes the prettiest Arthur you’ve ever seen (seriously, the header image...

Review: The Wall

May 03 // Rick Lash
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Anything but simple
The premise is simple, the film anything but. Iraq, 2007. The war is coming to an end, but maybe someone should have told that to the "bad guys." Two American soldiers. Not just any American soldiers, but a sniper team, ...

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Spoiler: M. Night Shyamalan's Split & Unbreakable get one sequel, Glass, in 2019


Apr 28
// Rick Lash
Split, the first commercially and critically viable film from once superstar director M. Night Shyamalan in some years, was a pleasant surprise to say the least. To say more, it was capped off with a trademark M. Night twist ...
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Eliza Dushku developing, starring in adaptation of Glen Cook's The Black Company


Else, you'd be like who? If pic current
Apr 26
// Rick Lash
The Black Company, a fantasy series written by Glen Cook and begun in 1984 spanning ten books, deals with magic, and an elite mercenary unit. It's kind of right up Eliza Dushku's alley, as you may remember her from her time o...
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Deadpool 2, R-rated comic movie, gets summer 2018 release--holy $#!+


Apr 24
// Rick Lash
When Logan got an R-rating, and the substance to back it up, it was clear that the movie industry had embraced the trend begun by Deadpool in 2016. It was easy for them to do; pretty much everyone can embrace $783 million in ...
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Will Smith may voice Genie in live action prequel of Disney's Aladdin


Bradley Cooper as Apu anyone?
Apr 21
// Rick Lash
We haven't heard much about Disney's live action Aladdin prequel. In fact, it's been close to two years since we posted news here on Flixist, and that was basically just to say that they are in fact working on one. But now th...

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