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Review: Baby Driver

Jun 28 // Matthew Razak
[embed]221653:43629:0[/embed] Baby DriverDirector: Edgar WrightRated: RRelease Date: June 28, 2017 Don't worry. Baby Driver isn't a musical in the traditional sense. It doesn't have characters breaking out in song and spiraling into wild, Busby Berkley style dance numbers (unless you count car chases as dance numbers). Instead, it features Baby (Ansel Elgort), an expert driver who is forced into being the driver on a series of heists by Doc (Kevin Spacey). Through a series of events, Baby tries to pull himself away from a life of crime while falling for Debora (Lily James), a charming waitress he meets at a diner. The plot itself is a little thin, but that's because it's not really the point. What Wright wants to do with this film is turn soundtrack into character; make a film that flows as well as its soundtrack. It's a bold effort, and it makes the soundtrack the leading star. It's an absolutely fantastic soundtrack that runs the gamut from classic rock to modern rap, each song cued up with the film's editing and action. The excuse is that Baby has tinnitus so he's always listening to music to get rid of the ringing. What that results in is car chases cued wonderfully to songs, entire scenes edited to the beat of whatever Baby is listening to, and a soundtrack that often informs the film more than anything else going on on screen. It also means that every character is defined by the music, every choice bent around what's playing. Even the dialog is often a diatribe on the meaning of music to people, and in that aspect the film is endlessly interesting. Wright's direction of the action is just as interesting. His shots and editing go beyond coherent, which is a base we shouldn't have to applaud, but will thanks to having just seen The Last Knight. He weaves together brilliant plot, music, and real driving into some masterful sequences. The first 20 minutes of this movie are an almost perfect execution of Wright's "car chase musical" idea form the opening beats featuring “Bellbottoms” by The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion to the first moment that Baby's headphones sadly come off. Unfortunately, that marks a bit of a stumble for the film. The movie loses its thread a little bit once the full commitment to musical drops. Maybe it was impossible to really keep the entire film moving forward as a coherent whole while remaining faithful to the constant music (most musicals don't do that), but once the film ditches the idea to advance the plot it starts to lose some of its charm. There's still plenty of good to go around, and any time the film kicks back into car chase mode it picks the thread back up. But between these moments things get a little awkward. The movie still works, but it's disappointing it doesn't fully commit to its bold idea. Do not mistake a lack of fully successful execution with lack of quality. Part of the reason the film's inability to fully dive into its soundtrack-is-god style is so annoying is because what it's doing is so challenging and interesting, that when comes together it does it so well. This isn't some cheap gimmick like Suicide Squad tried to do. It's even a step up from Guardians of the Galaxy's use of soundtrack. It's a bold experiment in making music into a full blown character, and as an experiment it both works and fails. But man, when it works, like those first 20 minutes, it works so well.  I wish as much could be said for the story itself. While Baby and Deborah's story arc is pretty well flushed out, the rest of the characters lose a bit of push. This is especially true for Doc, who wavers between all out evil and a paternal gangster. With the focus on the music and action, the characters and their motivations get lost. The end of the film explodes into a bloody action flick that feels at odds with the almost charming tone of the rest of the film. Maybe this is a repudiation of the musical genre in general, and a wink at the soundtrack-as-character itself, but it feels almost like a cop-out. It's as if Wright realized he couldn't carry on his brilliant weaving of music and action so he just didn't. Baby Driver should be seen simply because it is such a bold and wonderful idea. It really does execute it well for most of the movie. That's why I kind of hate to say that it doesn't pull it off fully. That makes it sound like it has failed, but just trying to do this is a success. I'd rather have films that try something incredible and fall just a little short than ones that don't try at all.
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Fred Astaire meets Bullit
Edgar Wright is a director with a specific vision, and it's led him to make some of the most genre-bending films in the past decade, and some of the funniest. It's also led him to leave Ant-Man. How do you bounce back from so...

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There's close up faces and neon streets aplenty in the Good Time trailer


Neon and blood soaked New York
Jun 28
// Anthony Marzano
Like his fellow Harry Potter co-stars, Robert Pattinson has long been trying to spread his proverbial wings and find roles that show off his range as an actor. He may have stumbled a bit with the Twilight series, but since th...
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Hellboy: Rise of the Blood Queen is Rated-R; director Neil Marshall nods thanks to Deadpool, Logan


R-Rated comic movies make bank, bruh.
Jun 28
// Rick Lash
Hellboy reboot director Neil Marshall was recently spinning philosophical regarding his take on on the Hellboy material. He aims to take the good from former director Guillermo del Torro's take, and then make it much bloodier...
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New Death Note Poster looks better than the Show


Not the anime, the Netflix one, duh
Jun 27
// Drew Stuart
You remember Death Note, right? No, I'm not talking about the critically-acclaimed anime, or its manga counterpart. I'm talking about the Adam Wingard directed, takes-place-in-the-US-Netflix-original-movie known as Death Note...

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Kevin Bacon has worms: Syfy brings back TV Tremors reboot


No, seriously, Bacon has worms.
Jun 27
// Rick Lash
Because Hollywood is essentially a seething heap of worms mindlessly burrowing through recycled soil looking for fresh fodder, we're getting a second Syfy Tremors reboot, but this time with bacon! Kevin Bacon will reprise the...
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Director Matt Reeves confirms Ben Affleck is still Bostonian Batman


"I'm Batman. ... Still. ... Probably."
Jun 27
// Rick Lash
Because the world wants Flixist to create a true clusterfuck label, here we go again. If one searches back through our Ben Affleck Flixist timeline, one finds the following posts: April 13, 2016, Ben Affleck directing, ...
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Han Solo drama

More Han Solo drama: Lucasfilm hired acting coach for lead Alden Ehrenreich


Would that it were so simple
Jun 26
// Hubert Vigilla
The drama over the Han Solo stand-alone film continues. Last week, directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller were fired and soon replaced by reliable journeyman Ron Howard. Unfortunately this was six months into production. T...
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Box Office Numbers

Box Office Numbers: China's probably going to save the Transformers franchise...again


Wow, china that big
Jun 26
// Nick Valdez
Tranformers: The Last Knight is, well, a mess. Poor writing, poor pacing, poor Marky Mark, and is basically par for the course for the Transformers series. Yet, these things still make a ton of money. You ...
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Pitch Perfect 3 premieres 1st trailer; likely features women singing--Do-Re-Mi!


Jun 26
// Rick Lash
And there's your daily does of human being with its arm up to the shoulder in cow butt. You're welcome! As noted when Pitch Perfect 3 dropped poster art a few days ago, I'm a fan of the series. That's a precursor to everythin...

Review: War for the Planet of the Apes

Jun 26 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221622:43616:0[/embed] War for the Planet of the ApesDirector: Matt ReevesRelease Date: July 14th, 2017Rated: PG-13 Years after the events of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Caesar (Andy Serkis) is still struggling with his role in the death of his former friend and rival Koba. With the apes retreating to the forest, the last remnants of humanity have taken a more aggressive approach (sparked by Koba's attack on them years prior) led by the militant extremist, Colonel (Woody Harrelson). When Colonel crosses the line and threatens his family, Caesar decides to travel across the states to hunt down the Colonel and get his revenge.  First things first, War is absolutely gorgeous. Somehow improving on the visuals found in the second film, War gives us flair like snowy fur, wet fur, and several visually distinct settings. This film can often be dark (both figuratively and literally), yet the lighting is kept at such a balance each motion captured ape is still distinct when sitting in caves or walking around during night scenes. And although we've seen it in action two films prior, the motion capture animation is still sublime. Serkis' Caesar is, with just cause, a standout above the rest as Caesar now more closely resembles the intelligent apes found in the 70s films. I personally miss the broken English he spoke in the previous film, but a Caesar without stilted dialogue allows Serkis to evolve the character with a more nuanced performance outside of physical acting.  Each film in this modern Apes trilogy has had its own distinct flavor. Rise has an undercurrent of dread, constantly inching its way toward the expected uprising, Dawn is a clash of violence and ideologies as the new status quo is established, and War is the methodical denouement in which the stage is set for the Planet of the Apes story everyone is familiar with. Because of this, unfortunately, this film has more of a pacing issue than the others. Essentially becoming a revenge thriller as Caesar morphs into an one-ape army, War sort of meanders through the second act until the thread for the final act reveals itself. This slower pace seems entirely intentional as Caesar's revenge arc lacks any satisfactory developments. But regardless of how this deliberately slower act reflects Caesar's core growth toward the end of the trilogy, and conveying Caesar's loss of hope and direction, I can't help but think a brisker pace would make the tone of the eventual ape escape less jarring. If all this talk of a slower, character intensive piece scares you away, no need to worry. I'm not going to go into depth about it here, but there's a extended prison break scene and it's probably the best thing in this entire trilogy. While War loses the grey morality of the previous two films as one side is a clear cut villain -- thus losing a bit of the nuance of the rest of the trilogy -- having a side to truly root for improves the trilogy overall. It's sort of freeing, actually. The tone of the film gets a more lighthearted spin once Bad Ape (Steve Zahn, pictured below) is introduced and the pacing problems of the second act melt away completely. The final third of the film is fun, has quite a bit of metaphorically intriguing imagery, and brings the trilogy to a close in a splendid way.  When all was said and done, I couldn't believe how this trilogy pulled it off. It's rare you'll get one well made reboot film, let alone an entire trilogy. The Apes trilogy has always been a sleeper hit these past few Summers, and because of the smaller attention, Matt Reeves was able to keep a steady vision for the final two films without much interference. War for the Planet of the Apes is a "blockbuster" in name only, and because of this was able to make the many brave choices it does. I mean, it's a film trilogy about monkey business which also includes death, hardship, disease, mediation between warring states, post-traumatic stress disorder, class struggles, and even some poop flinging for good measure.  I'm hard pressed to think of a better modern trilogy, or one that isn't one of the big five (Star Wars, Indiana Jones, The Godfather, The Lord of the Rings, and Back to the Future), that could measure up to this. War of the Planet of the Apes is the finest end to a trilogy I've seen in a long time. 
Apes Review photo
Ape Escape
Combing through nostalgic culture has become the norm, and unfortunately, so have the middling resulting projects. Audiences have, sadly, come to expect reboots to suffer as studios struggle to re-capture what made something ...

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Jon Watts most likely returning for Spider-Man: Homecoming 2


Also, that's no the title
Jun 26
// Matthew Razak
The sequel to Spider-Man: Homecoming was green lit the second Marvel and Sony decided to team up and bring Spidey into the MCU. I mean there's just no way it isn't going to make money and then the sequel will make money ...
Trailer: The Foreigner photo
Trailer: The Foreigner

Trailer: Watch Jackie Chan vs Pierce Brosnan in The Foreigner


So... Jackie Chan as Liam Neeson? Sold!
Jun 26
// Hubert Vigilla
Jackie Chan fights Pierce Brosnan. Yeah, you read that right. The Foreigner has Jackie Chan vs. an evil 90s James Bond (so basically Sean Bean?), and it looks like a solid revenge thriller. Rather than Chan playing his usual ...
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Pitch Perfect 3 has picture perfect poster: Last Call Pitches


Jun 24
// Rick Lash
Pitch Perfect has been an unexpectedly enjoyable franchise. It's irreverent, yet stays on point, and by and large does a wonderful job of staying in the realm of comedy while still having a story (as non-earth shattering as i...
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New image of shows of Star Trek: Discovery's teleportation bay


This isn't the Abrams-verse?
Jun 23
// Matthew Razak
All this week we've been getting scattered new images from Star Trek: Discovery as we get closer and closer to the show's September 24 premier date (the first episode will be aired on CBS with the rest on CBS's streaming...

Review: The Bad Batch

Jun 23 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]221600:43618:0[/embed] The Bad BatchDirector: Ana Lily AmirpourRating: RRelease Date: June 23, 2017 (limited) Don't get me wrong. There are things about The Bad Batch that I love, but they're undermined by boring self-satisfied self-indulgence. In the film's post-apocalyptic world, prisoners are released at the Texas border and left to fend for themselves. Arlen starts the movie wandering the wasteland but is soon kidnapped by cannibals. She loses an arm and a leg before she escapes to a makeshift town called Comfort. (On the way she meets a mute and nearly unrecognizable Jim Carrey.) Comfort is run by a charismatic cult leader surrounded by an army of bodyguards/brides. He's played by Keanu Reeves, who seems to be doing his best impression of Edgar Allan Poe doing a bad Keanu Reeves impression. At night, Comfort becomes a small scale post-apocalyptic Burning Man, complete with a DJ bumping tunes in a giant, light-up boombox. In all that I've written, what's not to love? The answer is Arlen. After about 30 minutes in a two-hour movie, my patience and goodwill dissipated because of her and the film's unwillingness to do anything interesting with her. Maybe it's odd of me to expect character from a moody would-be cult movie, but Arlen's lack of character causes The Bad Batch to implode around her. She doesn't want anything, doesn't need anything, has no sense of motivation or an internal life. She just kind of wanders around. For a movie with such a strange world, it's too content with being listless. Arlen is a non-character surrounded by more interesting supporting characters. There's no compelling story to tell in The Bad Batch; it's just a bunch of sets, locations, a primary cast, and a little stunt casting. In one of the early moments of The Bad Batch, Arlen meets a scavenger and her daughter. They both come from the cannibal colony that Arlen fled, but she's never interacted with either of these characters before. She murders the mother in cold blood even as she begs for mercy, but spares the daughter, Miel (Jayda Fink). The little girl mutely follows her mother's killer. It's done out of revenge, I get it, and yet Arlen doesn't seek further revenge on those who actually amputated her limbs. She just hangs out in Comfort and that's it. Miel would have made a more interesting main character. Miel's father, Miami Man, could have carried the film as well. He's a hulking bodybuilder cannibal played by Jason Momoa doing an impression of a good Keanu Reeves doing a bad Cuban accent. Like really, really bad. Momoa's at least a driven presence on screen since I knew what he wanted (i.e., to find his daughter... and maybe eat someone). Arlen and Miami Man meet and strike up a bond that verges on attraction but, like so much else about the movie, goes nowhere. They hide beneath a sheet during a sandstorm, intimately close, Miami Man unaware that his companion is his enemy. In a different film this moment could be filled with a edgy or even erotic charge. In The Bad Batch, it's just two attractive people under a flapping white sheet. In my head, I keep thinking of The Bad Batch in terms of El Topo since they're such opposites. Everything in El Topo feels meaningful because Jodorwosky builds his movie around a character's spiritual quest and obsessions. All objects are symbols, actions have cosmic consequence, the finale is apotheosis. The Bad Batch reduces its symbols to objects, strips actions of their greater meaning, turns dialogue into babble. A rambling Reeves monologue late in the film is tedious nonsense about seeds and plumbing. Jodorowsky's The Holy Mountain summed up the gist in just nine words: "You are excrement. You can change yourself into gold." Though beautiful, The Bad Batch is a tautological movie rather than spiritual or philosophical: a meaningless wasteland about a meaningless wasteland. It's not gold, that's for sure.
Review: The Bad Batch photo
What if El Topo was about nothing?
Ana Lily Amirpour's A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night was a sparse yet stunning debut that overflowed with languid cool. So much of Girl Walks gets by on its moody/artsy posturing, which had shades of Jim Jarmusch's early work...

Lord and Miller fired photo
Lord and Miller fired

Details emerge on why Lord and Miller were fired from Han Solo


They basically made another movie
Jun 23
// Hubert Vigilla
The news of the week has been the chaos surrounding the stand-alone Han Solo movie. Directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller were fired Monday after six months of production due to major creative differences. Yesterday Lucas...
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Jurassic World 2 is Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom


When do the dinos get machine guns?
Jun 23
// Rick Lash
Jurassic World's Twitter account--yes--it has a Twitter account--took to the internet to proclaim to the world, in 140 characters or less: "Hear ye! Hear ye! Our second act, not being the first, shall be titled and known, fro...
Ron Howard Han Solo photo
Ron Howard Han Solo

Ron Howard is the new director of the stand-alone Han Solo Star Wars movie


The journeyman director's director
Jun 22
// Hubert Vigilla
Earlier this week, Lucasfilm fired directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller from the young Han Solo movie. They were six months into production, but major creative differences led to an unexpected and unprecedented split. Today L...
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Family friendly Fantastic Four threeboot planned


Time is a flat circle
Jun 22
// Anthony Marzano
After the dismal response on the gritty Fantastic Four reboot from a few years back, the planned sequel that was supposed to come out this summer season was scrapped. Rather than let a single comic series go untapped, 20th Ce...
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Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later trailer takes place ten years later


That is quite the list of cast members
Jun 22
// Matthew Razak
When Netflix first announced it was turning Wet Hot American Summer into a prequel TV series I popped some gum and made out like a bandit I was so excited. And then the show was just as weird and funny as the movie so I poppe...
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David Fincher is directing Brad Pitt's World War Z sequel


Please be good, please be good
Jun 22
// Drew Stuart
As reported by Yahoo news, David Fincher will be helming the yet unnamed sequel to Brad Pitt's 2013 blockbuster World War Z.  If you're a fan of Fincher's work, then you know that this isn't the first time these two have...
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Saw 8 has title: Jigsaw ... comes with weird puzzley graphic


Charlie Brown: An 8th Saw-Oh good grief!
Jun 21
// Rick Lash
Because Hollywood is the land of opportunity [read: a complete and utter lack of originality] and audiences are so nuanced of taste and subtly responsive to the creative processes of their filmmakers [read: sheeple who will w...
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New trailer for HBO's Game of Thrones Season 7 satisfies


Winter is here on July 16
Jun 21
// Drew Stuart
It's been roughly a month since the last trailer for HBO's Game of Thrones dropped, but when you're hotly anticipating one of the best shows on TV, that wait can become an agonizing struggle. On top of that, GoT is premiering...
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See Okja early and free


Washington DC screenings
Jun 21
// Matthew Razak
Bong Joon Ho's Okja is coming to Netflix soon, but if you'd prefer to see the movie in theaters we've got the chance. It's one of those movies that does look great on the big screen, and seeing it with an audience should...
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Star Wars Han Solo spinoff directors get the Donald Trump goodbye: You're fired!


Should have seen this coming
Jun 21
// Rick Lash
News broke yesterday that the writer-directors of the forthcoming Star Wars Han Solo spinoff prequel were leaving the project. But things aren't always as they seem. The day began as any other for Phil Lord and Chris Miller. ...

Review: Transformers: The Last Knight

Jun 21 // Matthew Razak
[embed]221624:43613:0[/embed] Transformers: The Last KnightDirector: Michael BayRated: PG-13Release Date: June 21, 2017 Transformers: The Last Knight doesn't so much have a plot as it has a bunch of action sequences attached together by people saying words that make no sense. If you recall from the end of the last film, Optimus Prime launched himself into space to find the Autobots' creator. In his absence more Transformers have come crashing to earth and humanity has started to be dicks to them and rounding them up. Cade Yaeger (Mark Wahlberg) is hanging out with the Autobots from the last film, including Bumble Bee, as an outlaw who is trying to protect as many of his robot friends as his can. Then... I don't know... some things happen in no logical order. Anthony Hopkins shows up along with Laura Haddock, and everyone stands around spewing incoherent exposition until the next action sequence is cued up. My ongoing complaint with these movies has always been that these Transformer films aren't about the Transformers, and The Last Knight is the culmination of this. The first three quarters of this movie is almost entirely "human" interaction. I put human in quotes because no actual humans interact like the characters in this movie, unless I've missed some universal memo where we're all supposed to speak as if we're delivering important one-liners every other sentence. There is so much illogical plot in this film and none of it involves the Transformers we're coming to see. I'm not sure who thought that Cade Yaeger (god, could that name be any douchier) was an interesting character, but he's not and none of the other characters are either, and I CAME TO A TRANSFORMERS MOVIE TO SEE TRANSFORMERS! The saving grace of the previous films was always Optimus Prime, voiced as wonderfully as ever by Peter Cullen. Cullen somehow made stilted dialog into into epic speeches, and Prime's constant Saturday morning cartoon proselytizing somehow made the idiocy of the films more palatable. So what does The Last Knight do? Removes him from the plot until the third act! Any hope that the end of the last film signaled that we'd get a Transformers-focused film for once are instantly dashed in the opening scene as Prime is basically tied up and not mentioned again for the next hour and half. When he does return the movie instantly moves from "stab me in the eyes for the love of god kill me now" to "OK, just put me in a coma," but that's not much of an improvement, obviously. I will say that the action is actually better than the last film in terms of execution. Age of Extinction was a directorial mess in this department for a variety of reasons, but Bay seems to have put his brains back in his head this time around, and edited together some crisp sequences. The last battle actually pulls you to the edge of your seat, and you can follow what's going on instead of being lost in a blur of cuts. However, being better than the last film in terms of action wasn't a high bar to jump, and this one barely clears it. Action sequence aren't put together to be complete scenes, but instead more of a series of ideas that Bay clearly thought would be cool. At one point there's a time freezing gun, and at another gravity just randomly disappears. Sure it makes for some cool shots, but the action itself becomes illogically incoherent -- a series of camera swoops mushed together into explosion porn. Another not-actually-impressive feat is that the film somehow goes on (and on and on and on) for two-and-half hours. I know these films make a lot of money, but could someone please reign Bay in just a little bit? Even a tiny modicum of restraint in terms of action sequences, slow motion pans over a woman's body, or hapless exposition could have saved trillions of theater goer's brain cells. As it stands Bay and the screenwriters are basically allowed to do whatever the hell pops into their head. Entire characters are introduced and then ignored for most of the running time of the film, and most of them aren't even needed in the first place. At one point a WWI tank Transformer just sort of rolls up, makes a random explosion and then is never seen again. It's like Star Magic Jackson Jr. walked into a room of 4-year-olds and green lit whatever the hell they wanted.  It's also hard to honestly express just how many plot holes are in this film. Plot hole is too light a term. Plot black hole? Plot hell hole? Using the word plot anywhere near The Last Knight just seems wrong. There are literally moments in the movie where they just make a joke about not caring about a coherent plot. I suppose they hoped poking fun at their inability to develop logical reasons for the characters to progress from one point to another would distract us from that very fact, but none of the humor is that funny either. Everything comes straight out of action movie screenplay 101, and it couldn't feel more contrived. Romance. Check. Family. Check. Old guy saying a bad word. Check. It's all so pandering that I can't believe that audiences can't see what they're doing. We can't be this stupid to eat this up and laugh at tired jokes. There is always a defense of films like this that we're just supposed to shut our brain down and enjoy the ride. But this isn't a ride, it's a death trap. Yes, there are films that are great for just enjoying. Michael Bay himself has directed many of them, but Transformers: The Last Knight should not be enjoyed. Giving this movie money is re-enforcing everything wrong with the industry, and possibly everything wrong with the world. It is a mountain of turgid garbage. It is elephant vomit expelled into a pile of rotting corpses. If it was a person it would be going to a very special circle of hell. It is, for lack of a better word, bad.  You got us, Kaufman. You got us good. 
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I'm running out of synonyms for bad
Transformers: The Last Knight is proof that Andy Kaufman is alive. When the first film arrived it was a classic Michael Bay film. Yes, it was dumb, and full of stupid, but it had awesome action, and Optimus Prime, and it...

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Continental centric prequel to John Wick planned for TV


Welcome to the possibilities
Jun 21
// Anthony Marzano
In what could only be described as an answer to my prayers, a prequel of sorts to the 2014 breakout hit John Wick is being planned for TV. The kicker? It's all centered around The Continental hotels where no assassin business...

Daniel Day-Lewis has retired from acting

Jun 20 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]221623:43612:0[/embed] Day-Lewis' career has been full of memorable performances dating back into the 1980s. His breakthrough was 1989's My Left Foot, for which he won his first Academy Award. Day-Lewis would also win Oscars for his performances in There Will Be Blood and Lincoln; he received Best Actor nominations for In the Name of the Father and Gangs of New York. Day-Lewis will purportedly promote The Phantom Thread as the film gets closer to release. Perhaps more details will emerge then regarding this very sudden decision. Now if you'll excuse me, I'm going to rewatch The Unbearable Lightness of Being, The Last of the Mohicans, and The Boxer. I'm going to need a lot of milkshakes. [via Variety]
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No more milkshakes
In totally unexpected news, Daniel Day-Lewis has decided to retire from acting. One of the finest actors of his generation, Day-Lewis' last onscreen role will be in Paul Thomas Anderson's The Phantom Thread, which comes out D...

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Scarlett Johansson says Avengers: Infinity War will have scene with 32 characters


Avengers: Royal Rumble?
Jun 20
// Rick Lash
Scarlett Johansson, aka Scar-Jo, aka The Crimson Swedishman visited The Late Show with Stephen Colbert to promote her Rough Night (as rough as it proclaims; read all about it!). And somewhere along the way, fan...
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The Only Living Boy in New York gets trained to woo his dad's lover by Jeff Bridges


Home where my parents love lies dying
Jun 20
// Anthony Marzano
I'll admit I'm a sucker for a good New York City story. Having grown up in the state that the Big Apple uses for a garbage deposit I've spent many days wandering around the city just breathing in the feeling of the city and t...

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