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Honest Trailers: Oscars photo
Honest Trailers: Oscars

Honest Trailers runs through the 2017 Oscars' Best Picture nominees


All the noms
Feb 24
// Hubert Vigilla
The Oscars are this weekend, which means everyone gets to complain about the Academy letting them down in some way. This is an annual tradition. It's like getting into an argument with your dad around Christmas, or getting to...
Seth Meyers' Oscar Bait photo
Seth Meyers' Oscar Bait

Seth Meyers' Oscar Bait takes jabs at all the awards season tropes


Snot and feels
Feb 24
// Hubert Vigilla
Ahh, Oscar bait. We know it when we see the trailer--the pandering tone, the appeal to non-denominational spiritual uplift, the all-star cast or the stunt-cast star, the Hallmark greeting card ruminations on the meaning of li...
Uncharted screenplay photo
Uncharted screenplay

Joe Carnahan talks about his R-rated Uncharted script and its crazy action sequences


Let's get crazy
Feb 24
// Hubert Vigilla
The Uncharted movie looks like it's finally moving forward. Yes fellas, honestly and for reals this time. Joe Carnahan finished his screenplay not too long ago, and Shawn Levy was plucked from left field to direct. In an inte...
Nightwing movie in DCEU photo
Nightwing movie in DCEU

Warner Bros. adds Nightwing movie to DCEU because no one knows what they're doing


Lego Batman's Chris Kay to direct
Feb 24
// Hubert Vigilla
The Batman family is growing in the DC cinematic universe. For one, Matt Reeves agreed to direct the new Batman movie. On top of that, Warner Bros. is now planning a live-action Nightwing movie. The Lego Batman Movie dir...

Matt Reeves Batman photo
Hello Matt Reeves my old friend
Finally some good news for Ben Affleck's The Batman. Matt Reeves (War of the Planet of the Apes, Let Me In) has decided to direct the new solo Batman movie. This comes just days after talks broke down and Reeves declined the ...

Alien: Covenant photo
Alien: Covenant

Alien: Covenant gets a prologue with food and drinking


These people will die
Feb 23
// Matthew Razak
Yesterday we got our first good look at the crew of Alien: Covenant and today we have a bit of a prologue to the film that's been released. "Prologue: Last Supper" doesn't really tell us much, but it has fun playing with...
Castlevania poster photo
Castlevania poster

Adi Shankar releases teaser poster for the Castlevania series on Netflix


Needs more stupid Medusa heads
Feb 23
// Hubert Vigilla
Castlevania producer Adi Shankar has been using Facebook as a hype machine. Years ago he teased the potential series on his Facebook page. Shankar would then take to Facebook to confirm two seasons of Castlevania are in the w...

Review: Get Out

Feb 23 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
[embed]221322:43429:0[/embed] Get OutDirector: Jordan PeeleRelease Date: February 24, 2017Rating: R The opening shot of Get Out is a tour de goshdarn force. If you've seen David Robert Mitchell's (exceptional) It Follows, this is in the same vein. We're in a suburb, and we're following a young black man as he talks on the phone. He's in white people country, and he's kind of lost. As he walks, the camera follows, and soon we see a car come up the street beside him. The car follows, and he turns around, because "No, not today" (cue first laugh of the movie). He goes into the street, and suddenly someone, face obscured, comes up behind him and chokes him out. This someone drags the man to his car and puts him in the trunk. The car drives away. Get Out. Nice. It's the perfect preparation for what is set to come: a horror comedy about racism. A great horror comedy about racism. Probably the best one, though I'm not really sure what its competition is. Like most people, I've been of a fan of Jordan Peele's since Key & Peele got started, and I greatly enjoyed his turn in Keanu (my review of which was also heavily focused on race; I don't know why this keeps happening). But this is different. Having skipped trailers or really any information of any kind, I had kind of expected to see Peele play some role in the film. In fact, there's a role that would have definitely gone to him were it in a K&P sketch. But that's not what this is. He was just the writer and director here, and his debut film is all the better for it. There will be people who say that this film spends too much time on race. They will say that, because more-or-less every single scene in Get Out is making a statement on race or racism, and that makes them uncomfortable. (I'm talking about white people.) Let's take the premise: Chris Washington (Daniel Kaluuya) is a black man going to meet his girlfriend-of-four-months's parents for the first time. Allison Armitage: Man, what a white name, right? He asks her if her parents know that he's black. She says no but not to worry about it; her dad would have voted for Obama a third time, and he is definitely going to mention it. Because that's what white people do. Case in point: Me. Yesterday. Talking about this movie. Once I got to the office, I went around telling people in my office just how good Get Out was, but when I got to a black colleague of mine who I am friendly with but don't know very well, I went about it a little differently. I mentioned John Wick 2 first, which I recently rewatched (still loved it). After recommending that, I mentioned Get Out, almost as though it was an afterthought. It was not an afterthought: John Wick 2 was an afterthought. But I was concerned that he might think I was telling him because he was black, so I changed my behavior. And you know what that is? That's racism. Subtle, harmless(?) racism, to be sure, but racism nonetheless. Most of what we see in Get Out is a little less subtle than that. At the Armitage house, the parents are... off-putting, and Allison's brother is disturbing, but the friends of the family who come to visit are really the point. As they're introduced, they make various comments about blackness to Chris, seemingly expecting to be applauded for noticing his skin color without running away screaming. And through it all, Chris just smiles and nods. (When Allison goes on a tirade about her family's behavior, Chris just agrees with a knowing look; this scene got some of those loud laughs from select sections of the theater. I assume that, for some, it was a lived experience... For me, it was just a well-constructed joke, but I continue to wonder exactly what that means. Was I laughing with it, because it seemed "relatable" on some level... or was I laughing at it because I know that kind of thing happens and thank gosh I don't have to deal with it?) Things get strange pretty quick. The white family's hired help, a black man and black women, have terrifying smiles plastered onto their faces, and their actions and words feel... wrong. You know something is off pretty from the get-go, but you don't know what. And then you think you know what, but you're dead wrong. And you're dead wrong for two reasons: The movie sets up a fairly simple explanation and then half-subverts it in a fairly fascinating way. The implications of what is going on don't actually make a lot of sense (certainly less than the fairly simple explanation I was expecting). The more you consider what exactly happened to these people, the more confused you'll get. The conceit is cool. In the moment, it's terrifying. But on reflection, it's less "Ahhh!" and more "... Huh?" And, without spoiling it too much, the question becomes: Why? You can understand the expressions and actions to some extent, perhaps, but there's a deeper level that just doesn't make sense the more I think about it. (I'll be seeing the film again soon, which I think speaks to how much I enjoyed it, and this is something I'll be spending a lot of time trying to figure out if it feels Right. I hope that I'm being dumb and not the movie, but I fear it's the opposite.) Speaking of fear, aside from some Very Loud Noises early on, Get Out isn't really overtly "scary." It's more generally creepy, and I'm a big fan of Generally Creepy. The way everyone acts is unsettling (at the very least), and the descent into madness gets into your brain. You wonder, especially early on, if something like this could actually happen. Could actually be happening. (You don't wonder that in the final act.) There's probably an argument to be made that the comedy and horror stuff are too separated. There are the funny sequences, most of which involve Chris's friend Rod, who is watching his dog for the weekend, and there are scary sequences, most of which take place at the Armitage home. There's not a whole lot of overlap between the two. I don't know if this is a good thing or a bad thing. Someone I talked to afterwards didn't like it (he also felt like the race issues had somewhat of an anti-climax, a point on which I vehemently disagree). I think it's strange but not necessarily bad. I'm not sure how levity could have really been injected into the actually horror elements, because on the face of it, the way people act is kind of funny. But it's not actually funny. It's horrifying. (Racism is bad, you guys.) Before we wrap this thing up, let's have one final digression about race: Get Out was shot by a white man. I knew this before I looked it up, because I spent a large portion of the film thinking about lighting. In an interview with Dealine, Selma cinematographer talked about the complexity of lighting dark skin. It's relatively easy to light white skin, especially very pale white skin (we glow in the dark, so they say). But dark skin's harder. Lit poorly, they seem to disappear entirely. Vox has a fascinating video about how color film itself (the physical object, not the medium) was originally designed for white skin at the expense of all others. As one might expect, much of Get Out is shot at nighttime and in the dark. I mean, the dark is scary. However, said darkness should be obscuring the evil in the shadows and not the person who acts as our anchor. On more than a few occasions, it is difficult to make out Chris amongst all those shadows. Crucially: it doesn't feel intentional. It feels like a mistake, one made by a man used to lighting white people in the dark. (He does this well, in the moments where it's needed.) And that isn't to say that someone has to be black to know how to light black skin, but it's definitely not something that comes naturally. For the most, this is a film that looks quite good (I mean, that opening shot, though), but it's a pretty glaring fault there and Get Out suffers for it. But neither this nor any of its other faults keeps Get Out from greatness. It's objectively well made, and a fascinating way to visualize the black experience. I don't know how true to life it is, but my guess is that it's more real than any of us want it to be. Some will write it off as a flight of fancy, but they do so at society's peril. There are lessons to be learned from Get Out. I know I'm going to be thinking about it for a long, long time. And thinking about how I reacted and why I reacted the way I did. It got in my brain, and it's supposed to. That's what I'm focusing on, not the logical inconsistencies or any of the technical issues. I'm thinking about what matters. And sometimes the answers to those questions are tough to face. Jordan Peele has shown himself to be a very talented filmmaker with a unique voice and vision. I am very excited to see what he comes up with next.
Get Out Review photo
Wherein I Whitesplain Racism (Great...)
There's a story I heard but cannot verify about why Dave Chapelle ended The Chapelle Show when he did, with tens of millions of dollars on the line. So the story goes, he was working on a sketch that dealt prominently wi...

RiffTrax Live photo
RiffTrax Live

RiffTrax Live 2017 Kickstarter underway: Samurai Cop, beach party, and surprise film


Samurai Cop!
Feb 22
// Hubert Vigilla
Last year, RiffTrax held a special live Mystery Science Theater 3000 reunion. Like the MST3K reboot, the reunion was made possible through Kickstarter. Mike J. Nelson, Kevin Murphy, and Bill Corbett are back this year with a ...
NYICFF 2017 photo
NYICFF 2017

The New York International Children's Film Festival (NYICFF) starts Friday 2/24


20 years of exceptional children's films
Feb 22
// Hubert Vigilla
Now in its 20th year, the New York International Children's Film Festival is one of NYC's more reliable film fests. They screen some of the best films aimed at children, teens, and families, with some impeccable curation and ...
Logan photo
Logan

Logan will have a post credit scene


Guess I'll see it again
Feb 22
// Matthew Razak
We here at Flixist friggin love Logan. It's a ballsy, brave, brash, violent and intriguing. It has it's flaws, but they're only flaws because it was just so damn different. One not-so-big difference from other Marvel films is...
Step Brothers 2 photo
Step Brothers 2

No Step Brothers sequel in the works, resisting temptation


When did this become a classic?
Feb 22
// Matthew Razak
When Step Brothers first came out it was marked as a middling comedy and I think most people forgot about it. But over the years its gained a bit of a cult following, which I don't fully understand since it's neither Wil...
MST3K photo
MST3K

Mystery Science Theater 3000 will debut on Netflix on April 14th


TUSK!
Feb 22
// Hubert Vigilla
After a highly successful Kickstarter campaign in 2015, the Netflix reboot of Mystery Science Theater 3000 is set to debut. The 14 new episodes will premiere on Netflix on April 14th. As of now, the movies that Jonah Ray and ...
RIP Hellboy 3...? photo
RIP Hellboy 3...?

Guillermo del Toro says Hellboy 3 is dead, creator Mike Mignola hints at creative tension


Aww crap
Feb 22
// Hubert Vigilla
At this point it seems like Guillermo del Toro has a knack for movies getting away from him. They gestate, they build, but they don't come to fruition. The Hobbit, for instance, and also At the Mountains of Madness. Now you c...
Scorsese on Netflix photo
BAH GAWD, THAT'S NETFLIX'S MUSIC
In a totally unexpected move, Martin Scorsese's forthcoming gangster epic The Irishman has moved from Paramount to Netflix. The $100 million film will star Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Harvey Keitel, and Bobby Cannavale, and co...

Tales from the Crypt photo
Tales from the Crypt

The Tales from the Crypt reboot has trailers now


M. Night Shyamalan brings it back
Feb 21
// Matthew Razak
There are episodes of Tales from the Crypt that are eternally stuck in my mind. The show's combination of horror, weirdness, violence and nudity made it an instant cult classic when it was on. Also, there was the comic, ...
Alien: Covenant photo
Alien: Covenant

New image for Alien: Covenant teases new trailer


Most of these people will die
Feb 21
// Matthew Razak
When the first trailer for Alien: Covenant landed I was pretty excited as it looked like a true return to from for the series after the oddness of Prometheus. I mean just check out this new picture; it's basically a smal...
Marvel Phase Three photo
Marvel Phase Three

Watch a rundown of Marvel Phase Three movies up to Avengers: Infinity War


Avengers gradually assembling
Feb 21
// Hubert Vigilla
The Marvel Cinematic Universe is running pretty darn smoothly, all things considered. There are nine MCU films scheduled through 2019, closing out with a new Avengers film that's currently awaiting a title. The other day, Mar...
Sandberg directing Shazam photo
Sandberg directing Shazam

Lights Out director David F. Sandberg in talks to helm Shazam


Well, at least there's that, DCEU
Feb 20
// Hubert Vigilla
Both The Flash and The Batman are having problems finding a director, which puts the DCEU in a pickle. In the case of the latter, Ben Affleck stepped out of the director's chair and Matt Reeves recently declined the job....
The Void US teaser photo
The Void US teaser

US teaser trailer and poster for The Void instills cosmic dread by way of 80s horror


John Carpenter and HP Lovecraft
Feb 20
// Hubert Vigilla
Last week we shared the UK teaser trailer for The Void, a cosmic horror film with shades of John Carpenter, H.P. Lovecraft, and Hellraiser II. Even though it was just 30 seconds long, it packed in lots of gore and dread. Toda...
Zatoichi/Motorhead combo photo
Zatoichi/Motorhead combo

A Zatoichi/Motorhead mash up is something you didn't realize you needed until now


Zatoichi is metal as f**k
Feb 19
// Hubert Vigilla
The Zatoichi series includes some of the most badass samurai films around. Starring Shintaro Katsu, the story centers on a blind swordsman who turns a new leaf as a traveling masseur. His violent past follows him wherever he ...
The Batman falls photo
The Batman falls

Matt Reeves will not direct Ben Affleck in The Batman after talks break down


Hello Dr. Zaius my old friend
Feb 19
// Hubert Vigilla
The Batman may be broken. Warner Bros. was in talks with Dawn of the Planet of the Apes/Let the Right One In director Matt Reeves to helm the new Batman film for the DCEU. According to The Hollywood Reporter/Heat Vision,...

Review: Logan

Feb 17 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221303:43419:0[/embed] LoganDirector: James MangoldRelease Date: March 3, 2017Rating: R  Logan is both a sequel to 2013's The Wolverine and a ending to the entire X-Men franchise. In the far-ish future of 2029, we find Logan (Hugh Jackman) making his way across El Paso, driving a limo for money. It turns out mutants have essentially gone extinct, and he is only doing odd jobs in order to take care of the now dementia-suffering Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart), who's loss of control over his mind has made him a threat. But one day he's approached by a woman accompanied by a silent girl named Laura (Dafne Keen) who needs help getting to the Canadian border and some place they call an "Eden for mutants." Begrudgingly accepting the task when he sees Laura shares a few similarities with him, revelations come to light as Logan has to come to terms with the man he's become. Logan is dramatically different than the rest of the X-Men films, and that's notably due to its R rating.  While I was initially afraid Deadpool's R rated success would mean Logan was full of extraneous foul language and violence (but without the cheekiness), what is present feels incredibly natural. Like we're actually seeing Wolverine for who he is for the first time, making every other performance seem neutered in comparison. This Logan is older, broken, and incredibly violent. He brutalizes enemies, but it's never portrayed as monstrous as his attacks could be because Jackman fills the role with a much needed humanity. The film always makes a point to note that he never initiates the attacks (unlike the brash Logan seen in, say, the first X-Men). The added caveat of slowly losing his healing abilities also grounds this comic book film in an unprecedented way. For all intents and purposes, Logan is a lonely, introspective character drama. While the character work admittedly will be more effective if you've seen some of the other X-Men films (at least the first one to explain some of the world's elements), it's not completely necessary. The film opens with a scene heartily establishing everything you need to know about this character, and I'll go as far to say it's the best opening scene in the franchise to date.  Logan is full of outstanding performances. While some kitchy turns from Boyd Holbrook's Pierce (a mysterious guy in sunglasses who's chasing after Laura, but Logan's not about that so mentioning his role in the story seems unnecessary), Stephen Merchant's Caliban, and a villain revealed later in the film tend to remind you it's a comic book film, the three central cast members anchor Logan's harsh reality. Hugh Jackman, drawing on his years of experience with the character, puts forth a stellar performance. As mentioned earlier, with the amenities afforded by the film's R rating, Jackman's performance rings more palpable than ever. Like this is the character he's wanted to portray since he signed on to these films all those years ago. His rapport with the sickly Charles is one of the best features in the film as he and Patrick Stewart have developed a mentor/pupil-father/son relationship over the years. Or at least ably portrayed as such. Then there's the young Dafne Keen, who's Laura is defined entirely through her physicality and manages to carve a distinct presence between the two.  Now Logan isn't perfect. One of the film's overlying themes of fighting one's past becomes a little too literal, the tone is so well established the encroaching X-Men talk feels out of place, and some of the dialogue unfortunately I felt I had to forgive under the "comic book film" qualifier, but thinking back on it, these issues didn't bother me as much as I thought they would have. Logan's imperfections lend credibility to the central character's imperfections. The film's problems mirror Logan's distraught sense of self. Is he the colorful hero of years past? Is he the beaten down man who's lost his sense of purpose after years of struggle? There's a distinct push and pull between the two tones as they blend into something not seen before in the genre. In fact, it seems, dare I say realistic?  Above all else, Logan is a film of consequence. It's the first comic book film weighted with actual drama and character work. There's an overwhelming sense of finality and dread permeating throughout making every one of Logan's struggles more tense than the last. If you've followed Wolverine through every one of his adventures, you're sure to be satisfied with Logan. If you haven't, there's still enough tactile emotion here seeping through Logan's ever-worsening wounds to draw you in even slightly.  I don't need to see another X-Men film, or another comic book film ever again. Thanks to Logan, they've become irrelevant. 
Logan Review photo
Brutal, harsh, and absolutely glorious
Logan is a response to a litany of unprecedented events. Comic book films are more popular than ever, the X-Men series is still a viable franchise seventeen years later, Hugh Jackman is still in great health an...

Sandy Wexler photo
Sandy Wexler

Adam Sandler's Sandy Wexler now has a trailer no one was looking forward to


Oh, it's that annoying Sandler voice
Feb 17
// Matthew Razak
You know when Adam Sandler does that weird voice where he's kind of talking like a baby, but not really. At some point it was funny, but now it's just kind of sad. Well Sandy Wexler, Netflix's next Adam Sandler movie, seems t...

Review: A Cure for Wellness

Feb 17 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221240:43388:0[/embed] A Cure for WellnessDirector: Gore VerbinskiRelease Date: February 17, 2017Rating: R Lockhart (Dane DeHaan) is a young, successful businessman who's tasked by his company to retrieve an executive who's vacationed to a wellness center in the Swiss Alps. But when he shows up to the center, a castle on top of a hill, and meets the mysterious Hannah (Mia Goth) and Dr. Volmer (Jason Isaacs) he discovers something's a miss in the Swiss. Especially when he's forcibly admitted to the asylum. A Cure for Wellness tests the limits of environmental characterization. It's almost as if it's a thesis statement positing how much a film's setting can balance out faults in its characters as long as its engagingly built. Wellness puts the bulk of its work behind building its central asylum, and thus every human character therein is overwhelmingly unlikable as a result. Lockhart's especially troublesome from the second he shows up on screen. While this is clearly an intentional choice, there's very little to invest in when you care so little about Lockhart's well being. Lockhart's put through the ringer, but the film never quite reaches a place where we care about anything happening to him. As he falls victim to various levels of body disfigurement and gross out torture, it becomes more about enjoying the visceral nature of its imagery rather than further the tension of Lockhart's situation. To slightly remedy this, Mia Goth's Hannah is this childlike sprite of a character who seems out of time and place. Every member of this asylum is an wealthy elderly individual leaving their life behind, but Hannah doesn't seem to have a life of her own. When Lockhart's goal transitions from escape to rescuing Hannah, there's a slight shift in his character but he's still very much irredeemable. Thankfully, Goth portrays the right sense of naivete but Hannah's characterization is all in the performance as the film gives her very little to work with.  The flat characters are only a reflection of the film's setting. But while the drab colors and muted tones do not do them any favors, it works wonderfully for the asylum. Verbinski, most likely culminating a career's worth of visual trickery, absolutely nails a creepy vibe. Stark whites (both in the asylum's outfits and staff) juxtaposed with slimy greens coupled with an overall sepia-toned frame to lock the asylum in a past time. Wellness also surprises with a couple of well composed shots (one of which can be sort of seen in the image below) that provide a welcome breather from the asylum's dank nature. This dankness elevates Verbinkski's eventual gross out, masturbatory thrills and truly reaches a point where it can get under your skin. It just never does. Despite this well crafted world, the narrative falls as flat as the characters. Wellness asks for a hefty amount of investment and forgiveness in order to truly enjoy it.  Due to the magical realism of the setting (where slightly mystical themes and subjects coexist with the modern world), and Lockhart's constantly medicated physiology, Wellness essentially follows an unreliable narrator. But this great idea is stifled by a core mystery that's solvable within the first quarter of the film. Which means, you're left with characters making dumb decisions and have overall less sense plodding through the film's run time. It's Verbinkski's recent editing folly that also gives way to six different climaxes. There was a scene about two hours in that would've been a perfect end, but then it just kept going. That's only one example of this too. There are several sequences that feel entirely unnecessary as they neither build character or flesh out the ickiness of the surroundings. Speaking of icky, the actual ending of the film crosses from cool gross out horror into sexual assault and reaches 'B' movie levels of cheese. It's an unfortunate break in tone from the film's build up, and weird to have it both played straight and ridiculed concurrently. It's kind of a kick in the teeth for those who might've enjoyed the rest of the film.  A Cure for Wellness is a "glass half full or glass half empty" situation. It all depends on your perspective of its waters. Half full of good ideas, but half is brought down by poor execution of those ideas. A film I'd slightly recommend as a cautionary tale for film school students or as some goofy entertainment you'd drink through the first half but pass out before the end.  Unfortunately, A Cure for Wellness isn't even a cure for boredom. 
Wellness Review  photo
Remove the cause but not the symptom
Gore Verbinski has always been a peculiar director. I've been a fan of his ever since he did remarkable work adapting the Japanese film Ringu into The Ring (a series that has not fared well in his absence), but choices in Pir...

Trailer: The Void photo
Trailer: The Void

NSFW teaser trailer for The Void is a gory blend of John Carpenter and H.P. Lovecraft


I'm sold
Feb 16
// Hubert Vigilla
I was completely unaware of The Void until last night. Now it's one of my most anticipated movies of the next few weeks. (I mean, come on, it looks great, but I don't want to oversell it, right?) Written and directed by Jerem...
The House photo
The House

Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler are idiots in first The House trailer


Not betting on this
Feb 16
// Matthew Razak
Man, I am a big fan of everyone in The House, but judging from the trailer I don't think those parts are going to add up to much of a whole. Other than the final gag in the trailer almost nothing hits as really funny, just a ...
 photo

New clips, poster show 'Logan' being the best there is at what he does


It's not very nice though
Feb 16
// Matt Liparota
Hugh Jackman's purported final turn as popular superhero Wolverine "Logan" Patch in Logan hits theaters in about two weeks. Also starring Patrick Stewart and Dafne Keen, the movie sees an older, grumpier Wolverine on a quest ...
Mel Gibson Suicide Squad? photo
Mel Gibson Suicide Squad?

Mel Gibson among the directors courted for Suicide Squad sequel


Also Jonathan Levine and Ruben Fleischer
Feb 15
// Hubert Vigilla
While Suicide Squad didn't set critics on fire, it looks like a sequel is coming because we can't have nice things. Warner Bros. is hoping to keep the DCEU alive with its misfit band of killers and criminals, and they're...
The Raid (U.S.) photo
The Raid (U.S.)

The Raid remake rides again with Joe Carnahan and Frank Grillo


Make The Raid great again
Feb 15
// Matthew Razak
We happen to be massive fans of Gareth Evans films The Raid and The Raid 2: Berandal. This is mostly because he is possibly the best action director working and because they are some of the best action movies ever. So yo...

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