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New trailer for HBO's Game of Thrones Season 7 satisfies


Winter is here on July 16
Jun 21
// Drew Stuart
It's been roughly a month since the last trailer for HBO's Game of Thrones dropped, but when you're hotly anticipating one of the best shows on TV, that wait can become an agonizing struggle. On top of that, GoT is premiering...
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See Okja early and free


Washington DC screenings
Jun 21
// Matthew Razak
Bong Joon Ho's Okja is coming to Netflix soon, but if you'd prefer to see the movie in theaters we've got the chance. It's one of those movies that does look great on the big screen, and seeing it with an audience should...
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Star Wars Han Solo spinoff directors get the Donald Trump goodbye: You're fired!


Should have seen this coming
Jun 21
// Rick Lash
News broke yesterday that the writer-directors of the forthcoming Star Wars Han Solo spinoff prequel were leaving the project. But things aren't always as they seem. The day began as any other for Phil Lord and Chris Miller. ...

Review: Transformers: The Last Knight

Jun 21 // Matthew Razak
[embed]221624:43613:0[/embed] Transformers: The Last KnightDirector: Michael BayRated: PG-13Release Date: June 21, 2017 Transformers: The Last Knight doesn't so much have a plot as it has a bunch of action sequences attached together by people saying words that make no sense. If you recall from the end of the last film, Optimus Prime launched himself into space to find the Autobots' creator. In his absence more Transformers have come crashing to earth and humanity has started to be dicks to them and rounding them up. Cade Yaeger (Mark Wahlberg) is hanging out with the Autobots from the last film, including Bumble Bee, as an outlaw who is trying to protect as many of his robot friends as his can. Then... I don't know... some things happen in no logical order. Anthony Hopkins shows up along with Laura Haddock, and everyone stands around spewing incoherent exposition until the next action sequence is cued up. My ongoing complaint with these movies has always been that these Transformer films aren't about the Transformers, and The Last Knight is the culmination of this. The first three quarters of this movie is almost entirely "human" interaction. I put human in quotes because no actual humans interact like the characters in this movie, unless I've missed some universal memo where we're all supposed to speak as if we're delivering important one-liners every other sentence. There is so much illogical plot in this film and none of it involves the Transformers we're coming to see. I'm not sure who thought that Cade Yaeger (god, could that name be any douchier) was an interesting character, but he's not and none of the other characters are either, and I CAME TO A TRANSFORMERS MOVIE TO SEE TRANSFORMERS! The saving grace of the previous films was always Optimus Prime, voiced as wonderfully as ever by Peter Cullen. Cullen somehow made stilted dialog into into epic speeches, and Prime's constant Saturday morning cartoon proselytizing somehow made the idiocy of the films more palatable. So what does The Last Knight do? Removes him from the plot until the third act! Any hope that the end of the last film signaled that we'd get a Transformers-focused film for once are instantly dashed in the opening scene as Prime is basically tied up and not mentioned again for the next hour and half. When he does return the movie instantly moves from "stab me in the eyes for the love of god kill me now" to "OK, just put me in a coma," but that's not much of an improvement, obviously. I will say that the action is actually better than the last film in terms of execution. Age of Extinction was a directorial mess in this department for a variety of reasons, but Bay seems to have put his brains back in his head this time around, and edited together some crisp sequences. The last battle actually pulls you to the edge of your seat, and you can follow what's going on instead of being lost in a blur of cuts. However, being better than the last film in terms of action wasn't a high bar to jump, and this one barely clears it. Action sequence aren't put together to be complete scenes, but instead more of a series of ideas that Bay clearly thought would be cool. At one point there's a time freezing gun, and at another gravity just randomly disappears. Sure it makes for some cool shots, but the action itself becomes illogically incoherent -- a series of camera swoops mushed together into explosion porn. Another not-actually-impressive feat is that the film somehow goes on (and on and on and on) for two-and-half hours. I know these films make a lot of money, but could someone please reign Bay in just a little bit? Even a tiny modicum of restraint in terms of action sequences, slow motion pans over a woman's body, or hapless exposition could have saved trillions of theater goer's brain cells. As it stands Bay and the screenwriters are basically allowed to do whatever the hell pops into their head. Entire characters are introduced and then ignored for most of the running time of the film, and most of them aren't even needed in the first place. At one point a WWI tank Transformer just sort of rolls up, makes a random explosion and then is never seen again. It's like Star Magic Jackson Jr. walked into a room of 4-year-olds and green lit whatever the hell they wanted.  It's also hard to honestly express just how many plot holes are in this film. Plot hole is too light a term. Plot black hole? Plot hell hole? Using the word plot anywhere near The Last Knight just seems wrong. There are literally moments in the movie where they just make a joke about not caring about a coherent plot. I suppose they hoped poking fun at their inability to develop logical reasons for the characters to progress from one point to another would distract us from that very fact, but none of the humor is that funny either. Everything comes straight out of action movie screenplay 101, and it couldn't feel more contrived. Romance. Check. Family. Check. Old guy saying a bad word. Check. It's all so pandering that I can't believe that audiences can't see what they're doing. We can't be this stupid to eat this up and laugh at tired jokes. There is always a defense of films like this that we're just supposed to shut our brain down and enjoy the ride. But this isn't a ride, it's a death trap. Yes, there are films that are great for just enjoying. Michael Bay himself has directed many of them, but Transformers: The Last Knight should not be enjoyed. Giving this movie money is re-enforcing everything wrong with the industry, and possibly everything wrong with the world. It is a mountain of turgid garbage. It is elephant vomit expelled into a pile of rotting corpses. If it was a person it would be going to a very special circle of hell. It is, for lack of a better word, bad.  You got us, Kaufman. You got us good. 
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I'm running out of synonyms for bad
Transformers: The Last Knight is proof that Andy Kaufman is alive. When the first film arrived it was a classic Michael Bay film. Yes, it was dumb, and full of stupid, but it had awesome action, and Optimus Prime, and it...

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Continental centric prequel to John Wick planned for TV


Welcome to the possibilities
Jun 21
// Anthony Marzano
In what could only be described as an answer to my prayers, a prequel of sorts to the 2014 breakout hit John Wick is being planned for TV. The kicker? It's all centered around The Continental hotels where no assassin business...

Daniel Day-Lewis has retired from acting

Jun 20 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]221623:43612:0[/embed] Day-Lewis' career has been full of memorable performances dating back into the 1980s. His breakthrough was 1989's My Left Foot, for which he won his first Academy Award. Day-Lewis would also win Oscars for his performances in There Will Be Blood and Lincoln; he received Best Actor nominations for In the Name of the Father and Gangs of New York. Day-Lewis will purportedly promote The Phantom Thread as the film gets closer to release. Perhaps more details will emerge then regarding this very sudden decision. Now if you'll excuse me, I'm going to rewatch The Unbearable Lightness of Being, The Last of the Mohicans, and The Boxer. I'm going to need a lot of milkshakes. [via Variety]
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No more milkshakes
In totally unexpected news, Daniel Day-Lewis has decided to retire from acting. One of the finest actors of his generation, Day-Lewis' last onscreen role will be in Paul Thomas Anderson's The Phantom Thread, which comes out D...

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Scarlett Johansson says Avengers: Infinity War will have scene with 32 characters


Avengers: Royal Rumble?
Jun 20
// Rick Lash
Scarlett Johansson, aka Scar-Jo, aka The Crimson Swedishman visited The Late Show with Stephen Colbert to promote her Rough Night (as rough as it proclaims; read all about it!). And somewhere along the way, fan...
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The Only Living Boy in New York gets trained to woo his dad's lover by Jeff Bridges


Home where my parents love lies dying
Jun 20
// Anthony Marzano
I'll admit I'm a sucker for a good New York City story. Having grown up in the state that the Big Apple uses for a garbage deposit I've spent many days wandering around the city just breathing in the feeling of the city and t...

Review: Cars 3

Jun 19 // Drew Stuart
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Here in my Car(s 3)
Pixar has made a name for itself these past few decades by delivering quality kids films that everyone can enjoy, regardless of age. Yet among those films, the Cars series is rarely included, and for good reason. The storytel...

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John Carpenter penning sequel comic to Big Trouble in Little China


Little Trouble in Big Hell
Jun 19
// Anthony Marzano
Like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Fight Club before it, Big Trouble in Little China is getting the sequel comic treatment and it's being co-written by the master of the cult himself, John Carpenter. Titled Old Man Jack, the ...
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Daddy's Home 2 gets trailer, Mel Gibson, and hopefully not a single hot tub


Jun 16
// Rick Lash
A Flixist team member who shall remain anonymous perhaps said it best: "How did [Daddy's Home] get a sequel?" It's a question we imagine many of you have said on more than one occasion. Don't deny it. It's OK. We've all ...
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Your homeboys, Winnie da Pooh, Tigger, Yore, an Lil Roo get a trailer in Goodbye Christopher Robin


Jun 16
// Rick Lash
If you've ever wondered, 'What crazy son of a bitch invented these talking stuffed animals that are obsessed with fly honeys and terrified of heffalumps and woozles,' you're in luck my friend! Fox Searchlight Pictures UK brings you the unadulterated true story of Winne the Pooh creator A.A. Milne and how he stole the idea from his kid and never gave him a dime. I know: f'd up. Peep the trailer.

Review: 47 Meters Down

Jun 16 // Rick Lash
[embed]221613:43604:0[/embed] 47 Meters DownDirector: Johannes RobertRelease Date: June 16, 2016Rated: PG-13 By and large, director Johannes Robert managed this film masterfully. Little is wasted, and most stays true to form. The opening title sequence of a dark, ominous underwater scene proves to be the inside of a swimming pool. And one girl overturns another on a raft, causing a glass of wine to hit water and spread in pure imitation of blood. It’s one of the few times the director gets too heavyhanded: we know it’s a shark movie; no portent necessary. It’s then that we’re introduced to sisters Lisa (Mandy Moore) and Kate (Claire Holt). Lisa’s the stick in the mud whose boyfriend has left her because she’s too boring, while Kate’s the sort to tell her sister to get over it by banging the first bar fly she can find their side of the border in Mexico. When said bar fly recommends the sisters go cage diving with great white sharks, our story is set in motion. Writer Anthony Jaswinski admits the film follows the 127 Hours format—he means that you’re predominantly with one (or in this case, two) character for the duration, after some early introductions. But the similarities don’t end there; the format also calls for a sticky situation to keep your character alone, and we’re quickly provided one when the cage the girls go diving in proves to be of less than reliable quality and ends up on the ocean’s floor. That’s the premise. The cage is separated from boat. There are hungry, 25-foot sharks in the water. And our sisters are stuck in said cage with limited air supply. The film’s stars have said that this is not just a shark movie; it’s more than that. It’s a movie about being stuck at sea. This is true. It’s not just a shark movie; it’s really a movie that draws on and capitalizes on the many primal fears inherent in mankind: fear of being adrift at sea; fear of being adrift and immersed at sea; fear of the unknown (either under the water, or in the dark); fear of drowning; fear or suffocation; fear of being trapped; the fear of the immensity of everything else versus your own insignificance; fear of being at the mercy of forces greater than you; fear of being eaten alive. Where The Shallows began, 47 Meters Down continues, and ups the ante, allowing murphy’s law to dictate events. In an underwater cage surrounded by massive sharks? The cage will fail and leave you stranded. Have air tanks? Your supply is low. Have radios in rebreathers? You will be out of range. Reconnect the cage to a winch? The cable will fail. Get extra air tanks? You will face sharks. You get the idea. It’s a litany of what can go wrong, will go wrong, to the point where it borders on association with torture porn. These girls cannot catch a break, up until the film’s conclusion. And maybe not even then. The twists and turns deserve to remain in tact, in the dark, for you to enjoy unspoiled. But what can safely be said is that 47 Meters Down plays on your worst fears and delivers psychological terror. I had to detach myself to the ninth degree to watch it passively in order to write about it now. But if you allow yourself to be immersed in the dark of the theater, you’ll find yourself helplessly dragged in the film’s jaws, kicking and screaming, for the duration. The emotions are real; both Moore and Hoult spent more time underwater filming than is normal, and it reads. Robert directed them from above the water’s surface and had underwater crew on a different radio channel so that only he could communicate with the girls. They got a small taste of what they portrayed, and this was captured wonderfully and transcribed expertly. While, as noted, this is a shark film, the director must know the material well; where other films would get lost in the violence, Robert uses tension to perfection, and deaths, when they come, are impactful, but not focused on, and the tension is instantly restrung, meaning that you’re never quite off the hook. With few miscues—an unnecessary camera spin in one ascending shott--the film succeeds independently of the its sister film from 2016—even if you’ve seen The Shallows, you should still see 47 Meters Down.
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Measures Up
47 Meters Down is a shark movie—if shark movie is a genre. No, not the campy, so-good-they’re-bad shark movies we’ve been getting for a decade and a half now [ask anyone I know—my favorite of these is ...

Review: Rough Night

Jun 16 // Rick Lash
[embed]221612:43603:0[/embed] Rough NightDirector: Lucia AnielloRelease Date: June 16, 2016Rated: R Rough Night is the story of four college friends who promise to always be there for each other, and of how life sometimes has a way of getting in the way of the best laid plans. Jess (Scarlett Johansson) is a state politician of some sort (or on her way to becoming one) and is also getting married. Alice (Jillian Bell) is her overeager friend planning her bachelorette party. The gang is rounded out by Blair (Zoe Kravitz) and Frankie (Ilana Glazer). Oh, and then there’s Pippa (Kate McKinnon), Jess’s college friend from semester abroad, and a convenient Aussie accent to add to the mix. The friends convene in Miami for shenanigans, but, after drinking, weed, coke, puking, and penis shaped paraphernalia, things go awry with the arrival of a male stripper. If you’ve seen the film’s marketing, you may be aware of what comes next. I was, and I’ll admit that I was quite curious about how writer / director Lucia Aniello intended to deal with this twist. SPOILER ALERT: the stripper is killed; another senseless victim of bachelorette party extravagance and overindulgence. It was obvious from the same marketing, that the film wasn’t going to hide from this plot point: it was going to own it. This movie might even revolve around the death of a stripper: it’s, at the very least, the major plot point development in the movie. Stripper-based humor and even dead stripper humor is nothing new, and yes, it’s refreshing that the tables are turned here, reversing what have become standard gender roles: all good—like I said, I was really curious how this would be dealt with, as it’s a bit dark for comedy dealing with a bachelor / bachelorette scenario. Unfortunately, the answer is, poorly. Going back to that fine line between a rough night and a my life is over night, this moment is clearly filmed as the later. Aniello never makes light of the seriousness of what’s happening, while it’s happening. The music shifts, the action plays out all to graphically and convincingly, and I, for one, found myself wondering if this was actually a comedy, or was going to reveal itself to be quite a dark drama disguised under opening volleys of laughter and comedic humor. Thankfully, mercifully, it is a comedy, and the seriousness given to a woman accidentally killing a man in a moment quite reminiscent of the defining murder from Unfaithful (in which Gere slams a snow globe over a man’s head, killing him). They’re visceral deaths, blood is not spared, and they’re not humorous, in any sense. It’s jarring, to go from jokes about swimming in a sea of dicks, to involuntary manslaughter, and back to dick jokes (putting dick-nose sunglasses on the corpse to cover its creepy, dead eyes). The theater became quite silent when it happened. People were groaning and turning away even. Like I say, we are not in the midst of a drama, it’s a comedy, and after Jess and gang make every wrong decision you might possibly make in their situation, we’re steered back towards comedy. But it’s always a little off from that moment on. It’s irreconcilable how the characters react to having taken a life, through that jarring transition, to how they deal with the body and crack light of it afterwards—not enough time has elapsed, consequences are still unfolding rather quickly in rather frightening, real terms (as Blair calls her criminal defense lawyer slash uncle and learns that by moving the body and altering the crime scene they’re commiting serious crimes—no shit—but they are all on drugs and booze, so understandable). It would be OK, if this were a dark comedy and this was just the moment where it goes dark--but it's clearly not. It’s not that there’s something wrong with characters forgetting what’s morally center, or committing crimes and laughing about it, it’s the inconsistency of mood from Act I (weekend away in Miami) to the Turning Point (Stripper’s head is cracked on fireplace hearth before he bleeds out) to Act II (disposing of the body and consequences). They just don’t gel. And, to be fair, if one of the Hangover films had dealt with the guys killing a stripper and then going through the emotional impact of what that really means immediately after, that wouldn’t have been funny either. Those characters do incredibly stupid things, highly illegal things, and do sometimes face unnervingly real consequences, but it never goes full dark comedy. It finds the line, hugs it, and then drunkenly walks it just well enough to pass the sobriety test (there’s a great scene in Rough Night dealing with one of these moments—more on that later). There's just something about cleaning a crime scene, and toweling up liters of blood, as a musical montage that didn't quite work. In another film sure to draw comparisons, Weekend at Bernie’s (and its eponymous sequel), we don’t get too real. The protagonists never deal with Bernie’s body voiding the contents of its bowels and how the guys deal with that while cops and potential witnesses linger nearby. Rough Night delivers laughs, don’t get me wrong. Act I is full of them. Bell and Glazer are at their usual best and do not disappoint. Clearly, pairing them with their known collaborator and director of Broad City was a win-win. It’s their standard best. Kate McKinnon is also great in her role as outsider, bringing just the right amount of wrong throughout. Johansson is more inhibited by her role as (maybe) uptight-wannabe-politician; she’s never able to fully break loose of her character role to sling banter with the comedic regulars. She does her best in whoo girl moments, but her biggest wins are born from clever writing that pokes fun at tiny everyday moments like a politician’s forced smile in a political TV spot and the difficulty in holding it naturally; or in great post-coke snorting tirades. In fairness, her character is a passive one, who’s more out there friends take actions that dictate her own; in American Pie terminology, she’s the Kevin of the group. One of her more genuine comedic moments may have been when the movie opens in full-on college flashback with the four friends gathered around a beer pong table. It’s a fun scene, one carefully reconstructed from a college frat house a decade passed as they even have J-Kwon’s Tipsy playing in the background. Let’s be clear, it was humorous, in of itself, to see Johansson, Glazer, Bell, and Kravitz pretending to be college-aged. Kravitz is great, perhaps seeming more natural than in other turns (the Divergent series, Fantastic Beasts), but isn’t able to flex true comedic muscles as her role is relegated to satiating an odd plotline with some hedonistic locals (and a random cameo from Demi Moore). Then too, there’s an unexpected parallel series of events unfolding as Jess’s fiancé, Peter (Paul Downs, co-writer) has an incredibly mild “bachelor party.”These asides to the men enjoying a quiet wine tasting, or Peter and co. buying adult diapers (for a reason I won’t spoil) are pleasantly interjected in a way as to add levity to the seriousness of unfolding events in Miami where people are literally dying. These deft touches, throwing convention on its head, or alluding to those things we all know to be true (a drunk girl bursting into the flashback college dorm room to pee on the floor--something she does on a weekly basis), are the bread and butter here and in earlier successes from this team--successes that have made Broad City and all associated with it so wildly popular. It’s a stellar cast being directed by a comedic powerhouse based off a script by that same powerhouse and her writing partner: it’s not unfair to expect great things, and they do deliver laughs, and a good number. There’s just one hell of a downer right in the middle of it; a downer that sours half the movie.    
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Dead Stripper > Dick Jokes
Maybe I should have taken a cue from the title. After all, Rough Night is fairly self-explanatory. I'm a fan of irreverent comedies where protagonists can behave the way less ideal versions of ourselves might, all with n...

Happy Death Day photo
Happy Death Day

Trailer: Slasher movie Happy Death Day could also be titled Groundhog Die


Amiright or amiright? Amiright?
Jun 16
// Hubert Vigilla
Happy Death Day looks like my cheesy kind of jam. Take the hook of Groundhog Day, apply it to a slasher movie, and--bing--you have my attention for 90 minutes. (But not a minute more.) Yes, Happy Death Day is like Groundhog D...
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Alamo Drafthouse to serve Pakistani cuisine for The Big Sick


Here's hoping you don't get Bigly Sick
Jun 15
// Anthony Marzano
Indie darling and all around wonderful microchain Alamo Drafthouse is setting the mood to prepare for the upcoming release of Kumail Nanjiani's semi-autobiographical romcom The Big Sick. To help get movie patrons in the mood ...
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Jessica Chastain to play villain in Dark Phoenix X-Men flick


Real news: they've re-hired full cast
Jun 15
// Rick Lash
Jessica Chastain is in talks to portray a villain in the next installment of the X-Men series. Not confirmed. Villain is perhaps Lilandra, the empress of an alien empire called the Shi’ar, but also not confirmed. W...
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Danny Elfman will score Justice League now


Can at least one person stay, please?
Jun 15
// Matthew Razak
After Wonder Woman turned out to be so good I was kind of getting my hopes up that Justice League wouldn't actually be a total mess, but things are getting shaken up too much for me not to be worried. Obviously Zack...
Tom Cruise The Mummy photo
Tom Cruise The Mummy

Tom Cruise's excessive creative control may have ruined The Mummy


More like The Crum-- I can't even finish
Jun 15
// Hubert Vigilla
The Mummy isn't doing so hot. Poor reviews and a lackluster box office have put the entire Dark Universe cinematic universe in jeopardy. That might not be a bad thing, though. I mean, do we really need an Invisible Man movie ...
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Daniel Radcliffe gets lost trying to find himself in Jungle


Where's your Nimbus 2000 now?
Jun 15
// Anthony Marzano
In his ongoing bid to separate himself from his childhood role as Harry Potter, Daniel Radcliffe has been taking on a variety of roles to show that he's not just a wizard. He's been a "hunchback", a 1940's poet, and a dead gu...
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Venom not a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe: sad face


Jun 14
// Rick Lash
Venom, aka Tom Hardy wears a bodycon suit in Times Square for tips, will not be a part of Marvel's Cinematic Universe. That's according to to producer and President of Marvel Studios, Kevin Feige. According to Feige, "There i...
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New DuckTales opening is surprising in a few ways


Still no idea what a duck blur is
Jun 14
// Matthew Razak
I don't know if I'm going to be heavily invested in the new DuckTales cartoon like I was the original. That's mostly because I'm not a kid anymore, and I sadly don't have Saturday mornings to plop down and watch all the ...
This Corner of the World photo
This Corner of the World

Trailer: Acclaimed anime In This Corner of the World looks like a moving war-torn romance


This looks like something special
Jun 14
// Hubert Vigilla
I'm not familiar with the films of Sunao Katabuchi, but after watching the trailer for In This Corner of the World, I want to seek out his previous anime features: Princess Arete and Mai Mai Miracle. Katabuchi was also a...
The Gracefield Incident photo
The Gracefield Incident

Trailer: Found-footage movie The Gracefield Incident has aliens and a high-tech glass eye


Fake eye and aliens and things
Jun 14
// Hubert Vigilla
There will be no end to found-footage movies. (Barring some worldwide cataclysm that ends film and society as we know it, of course.) They're inexpensive and, in a handful of instances, innovative and inventive. Those rare fi...
David Bowie: The Image photo
David Bowie: The Image

Watch The Image, a 1969 horror short film starring a young David Bowie


At the time, this was rated X
Jun 13
// Hubert Vigilla
David Bowie had a memorable, otherworldly presence on screen. He was a believable strung out alien in The Man Who Fell to Earth, a seductive strung out vampire in The Hunger, a dance-happy goblin king in Labyrinth, a proper B...
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Flatliners reboot is a thing: shiny new undead trailer, poster


Do not resusitate?
Jun 13
// Rick Lash
Flatliners has been revived. Someone failed to note the DNR checked box on the back of it's 1990, expired driver's license and gave it a few thousand volts from a defibrillator. You're welcome. Because it's been 27 years and ...
T2 Trainspotting photo
T2 Trainspotting

Choose life, watch the first 10 minutes of T2 Trainspotting


Them accents, luv
Jun 13
// Hubert Vigilla
I never got around to seeing T2 Trainspotting. In fact, I haven't seen the first Trainspotting since maybe the year 2000. Yet I've been meaning to rewatch the original and its sequel back to back to see how they complement on...
New Spider-Man trilogy photo
New Spider-Man trilogy

Tom Holland reveals Spider-Man: Homecoming is the start of a new Spidey trilogy


HE'S IN THE OLD WEST, BUT HE'S ALIVE
Jun 13
// Hubert Vigilla
As we get closer to its release, my enthusiasm for Spider-Man: Homecoming has sort of cooled. I mean, I'll watch it, but I think one of the trailers pretty much gave everything away, and the newest promo stuff looks like a ju...
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47 Meters Down released a trailer a month ago: who knew?


Shark Movie! Summer Shark Movie!
Jun 13
// Rick Lash
Really, this movie is so little on the radar that its trailer got no PR and had been out for a month before I saw a spot watching the NBA Finals (widely known fact that basketball fans love shark movies nearly as much as they...
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Seriously watch it right now
We got a brief look at Black Panther last night during game 4 of the NBA Finals and to sum it up, it looks amazing. Set in the technologically advanced but secluded African nation of Wakanda, Black Panther will tell the story...


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