comedy

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Sharknado 3 has a title


Third movie in SyFy straight-to-TV franchise will air July 22
Mar 18
// Matt Liparota
You'd think two movies about weather-related shark attacks would be more than enough to last the human race until our surely-impending end, but sometimes the world is a funny place. Despite all logic, a third Sharknado f...
Lazer Team Trailer photo
Lazer Team Trailer

First trailer for Lazer Team, the most funded film in Indiegogo history


Mar 17
// Nick Valdez
I've never heard of Lazer Team, but the film has quite a huge following. Rooster Teeth (most know for sets of webseries like RWBY and Red vs. Blue) has released the trailer for their first film, and it looks pretty good. Cro...
Dead Rising Trailer photo
Dead Rising Trailer

Newest Dead Rising: Watchtower trailer is pretty fun, actually


Mar 10
// Nick Valdez
Starring the John Tucker Must Die kid, the AllState guy, and Rob Riggle as the best f**king Frank West possible, Dead Rising: Watchtower looks surprisingly good. With this trailer elaborating on the bits we got from the firs...
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Hansel and Zoolander walk the runway for Zoolander 2


What is this? A fashion show for ants!
Mar 10
// Matthew Razak
Zoolander 2 is happening and while it isn't so hot right now, it's about to be as the marketing is kicking off in a completely awesome way. Both Ben Stiller as Derrick Zoolander and Owen Wilson as Hansel (so hot right no...
Ghostbusters photo
Ghostbusters

Sony is planning a big Ghostbusters universe


It's Gozer not GozHER.
Mar 10
// Nick Valdez
If the latest news of Paul Feig's upcoming Ghostbusters film (featuring a cast of awesome ladies) somehow rubbed you the wrong way because Dude Ghostbusters looked like Lady Ghostbusters, don't worry Sony's got your back. Dea...
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Will Ferrell learns the finer points of fellatio in new NSFW Get Hard trailer


Don't leave Will Ferrell alone with your parents
Mar 02
// Matt Liparota
Warner Bros. hopes giving you an uncensored taste of the dick jokes and f-bombs in Get Hard will convince you to buy a ticket when it hits theaters later this month, so today the company dropped a new, NSFW trailer to whet y...
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FFS:

Flix For Short: The Boy Who Couldn't Sleep And Never Had To


So it is written, so it shall be
Feb 25
// Jackson Tyler
Hey, I really like this. Essentially a proof of concept short from writer DC Pierson and director Dan Eckman (based on Pierson's novel), it's the story of teenage best friends who get into all sorts of trouble when one ...
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Pee-Wee returns in Pee-Wee's Big Holiday on Netflix


Why Netflix? He's a loner, a rebel...
Feb 24
// John-Charles Holmes
It's been teased for years now, but it's finally official-- comedian Pee-Wee Herman (Paul Reubens) is finally making his long awaited cinematic return in a new original movie headed exclusively to Netflix.  The film has ...
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New poster for Welcome to Me starring Kristen Wiig


Feb 16
// Ciaran McGarry
Kristen Wiig's latest is a comedy drama in which she plays Alice Klieg, a woman with borderline personality disorder who wins the lottery. She promptly throws away her psychiatric meds, buys herself a talk show and uses it...
Hot Pursuit Trailer photo
Hot Pursuit Trailer

First trailer for Hot Pursuit starring Reese Witherspoon and Sofia Vergara


Feb 13
// Nick Valdez
Remember The Proposal? It was a not half bad film starring Sandra Bullock and Ryan Reynolds. Hot Pursuit is directed by the same woman Anne Fletcher, and also mixes two cast members you wouldn't expect with somewhat interest...
Trainwreck Trailer photo
Trainwreck Trailer

First trailer for Trainwreck starring Amy Schumer


Feb 12
// Nick Valdez
I don't know about the rest of you, but I'm definitely ready for more comedienne led films. One of my biggest films from last year (which you'll find on this handy list) was the Jenny Slate vehicle, Obvious Child. The two ma...
Aloha Trailer photo
Aloha Trailer

First trailer for Cameron Crowe's Aloha


Feb 12
// Nick Valdez
Sony has finally given us our first look at Cameron Crowe's, who's done so many fabulous projects like Elizabethtown, Jerry Maguire, Say Anything, Almost Famous, and uh, We Bought a Zoo, latest project Aloha. Starring Bradle...
Pitch Perfect 2  photo
Pitch Perfect 2

Newest Pitch Perfect 2 trailer is almost perfect


Feb 11
// Nick Valdez
I'm still very much as excited for Pitch Perfect 2 as I was in our staff's Most Anticipated of 2015 list, but this newest trailer for it worries me a bit. Sure it's got the same lovable 80s movie cheese (lol European super g...
Pitch Perfect 2 Spot photo
Pitch Perfect 2 Spot

Super Bowl TV spot for Pitch Perfect 2


Feb 02
// Nick Valdez
I've been worried about Pitch Perfect 2 since it was announced a few years ago. I really liked the first one (enough to watch it several times), and a lot of the humor just kind of *clicked* with me. But the more I watched i...
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Super Bowl TV spot for Ted 2


Tom Brady's golden penis
Feb 02
// Flixist Staff
While we got a more traditional trailer for Ted 2 this past Thursday it seems that was not what was in store for us during the amazing Super Bowl. Instead Ted 2 delivered almost a short clip starring none other tha...
Ted 2 Trailer photo
More Wahlberg, more jokes, and more semen apparently
Ted was a nice surprise. Seth MacFarlane's passion project shined with all of the humor and heart that I would've never expected from the guy who brought us Family Guy. Then A Million Ways to Die in the West came along and w...

Kevin Spacey: Cat photo
Kevin Spacey: Cat

Kevin Spacey to play a man trapped in a cat's body in MIB director's next film, Nine Lives"


Everything is beautiful and nothing hurts
Jan 29
// Sean Walsh
Here's some weird, wonderful news for you: Kevin Spacey is going to play a man trapped in the body of a cat in Barry Sonnenfeld's new film, Nine Lives. Kevin Spacey, you know, the guy from House of Cards. According to The Wra...

All female Ghostbuster reboot nearly cast

Jan 27 // Matthew Razak
[embed]218871:42163:0[/embed]
Ghostbusters Cast photo
Confirming the basically confirmed
We've heard plenty of rumblings about Paul Feig's upcoming Ghostbusters reboot that puts four female leads into the act of busting ghosts. Kirsten Wiig and Melissa McCarthy have both been rumored for quite some time, but toda...

Dead Rising Trailer photo
Dead Rising Trailer

First teaser trailer for Dead Rising: Watchtower


Jan 23
// Nick Valdez
For a film based off the cheesy Dead Rising videogames going straight to Sony's Crackle streaming service, this doesn't look that bad. Doesn't have enough Frank West covering wars though. Dead Rising: Watchtower is available March 27th. 

Nick's Top 15 Movies of 2014

Jan 16 // Nick Valdez
30-16: The Lego Movie, The Babadook, 22 Jump Street, The Purge: Anarchy, How to Train Your Dragon 2, Maleficent, Mr. Peabody and Sherman, Snowpiercer, Frank, Top Five, Gone Girl, Pride, The Drop, Nymphomaniac Vol 1, A Most Violent Year 15. Locke  I nearly missed out on Locke. With the smallest of small releases, I didn't see this until it was recommended by a friend a few weeks ago. I'm super glad I finally took the plunge. It's got the weirdest barrier of entry (it's better if you see it at night, you have to be in the right mindset), but it's totally worth the trouble. In a year full of bloated blockbusters, Locke is the concise breath of fresh air that reminds you what cinema is capable of. In the length of a Sunday night drive, Tom Hardy goes through so many complicated emotions. Enclosed, intimate, and fantastic.  14. Nightcrawler Nightcrawler (and Enemy, in fact) proved Jake Gyllenhaal still has some sides of his acting talent hidden away. With a strikingly dark, yet practical performance, he sells the film's dissection of sensationalist journalism. Literally crawling through the muck, Nightcrawler portrays the opposite end of ambition. When ambition morphs into an unhealthy aggression, one of the best films of 2014 was born.  Read our review of Nightcrawler here. 13. John Wick John Wick was an utter surprise and delight. Literally coming out of nowhere with a generic trailer that made the film seem like nothing more than a direct to home video action film mistakenly released to theaters, John Wick has a fantastic setting (I want another movie of just interactions within the assassin hotel hideout), wonderfully choreographed action (Keanu Reeves is really Neo at this point, which made the fantastical nature of the fights even more believable), and a story with so many cheesy twists and turns I fell in love instantly. Oh and the dog, Daisy! Oh. My. God. 12. Boyhood Filmed over the course of twelve years, it sort of makes sense to put Boyhood here. Both as a little dig, and because while I love what it did for cinema (and how much I enjoyed it directly afterward), I'm not as fond of it as I thought I was. While some of Mason's life speaks to me (I too had a drunk and abusive parent, was also directionless for the majority of life), a lot of it glazed over what my life was really like. Yeah, I know Boyhood won't be a depiction of my life, but it kind of stung to see someone live a happier life than mine. I don't hold it against the film critically (that's why it's here), but I'll never truly connect with it the way I think I'm supposed to.  Read our review of Boyhood here. 11. Dawn of the Planet of the Apes APEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is what we get for not hailing to the chimp. A summer blockbuster that was not only intelligent, well paced, and full of stunning visuals, but made me expect more out of my popcorn flicks. Bad action and explosions just aren't going to cut it anymore. Dawn says we can have both AND be a successful prequel/sequel at the same time. It doesn't get any better. This is what blockbusters should strive to.  Read our review of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes here. 10. The Guest The Guest is a film that will forever be welcome in my home. Before my screening, I knew nothing of it other than it was a follow up from the You're Next (which is also a film you need to see someday) duo of Adam Wingard and Simon Barrett. Figuring they were kind of a one trick pony (sorry, guys), I expected a run of the mill thriller with a genre twist at the end. But that's nowhere near the case with Guest. Completely confident in its lead Dan Stevens (with good reason), the film is full throttle from beginning to end. Its tone is never once tiring. With its homages to older horror films, a groovy synth inspired soundtrack, stylistic filming (there's a great use of light throughout) and fantastically staged finale, The Guest was one of my favorite movie going experiences last year. Read our review of The Guest here. 9. Joe Wow, so where has THIS Nicolas Cage been? We make fun of the guy for signing up for everything and anything, but he's some kind of wicked genius. It's when we forget how talented of an actor he can be that he decides to come out with a legitimately gripping performance. That's the heart of Joe. Three great performances (from Cage, Tye Sheridan, and the now passed Gary Poulter) root this tale in the South with the most human characters I saw last year. Remember Your Highness? This is from the same director. I just can't believe that.  Read our review of Joe here. 8. Edge of Tomorrow Just like with Nic Cage, Tom Cruise always has a surprise up his sleeve for when we forget how talented he is. It appears that both actors can truly surprise given the right material. Edge of Tomorrow (or whatever the hell it's named now) is a science fiction story about how some nerdy, cowardly man transforms into action star Tom Cruise after dying a thousand times. In the most unique premise of any science fiction film in recent memory (which is saying quite a bit as you can allude to sources like videogames), a man's life gets a reset button every time he's killed in a battle leading to some of the best and hilarious editing of 2014. And you know what else? Emily Blunt is a killer viking goddess badass and I wouldn't have it any other way.  Read our review of Edge of Tomorrow/All You Need is Kill/Live.Die.Repeat here. 7. Birdman Speaking of actors we've forgotten about, out comes Michael Keaton reminding us how much of a juggernaut he is. Sure he's had some subversive turns in films like The Other Guys, Toy Story 3 and RoboCop recently, but I haven't seen him challenged like this in a long time. Birdman breaks down Keaton and builds him back up again. A heartbreaking, absurd, hilarious, soul crushing, wonderfully shot film, Birdman is truly the peak of artistic creativity. Too bad Keaton overshadowed everyone else. But is that such a bad problem to have?  Read our review of Birdman here. 6. The Grand Budapest Hotel Budapest was my very first Wes Anderson film experience, and I'm so glad I finally took the plunge. Budapest is a film full of so much love, hard work, and time that it could only be put together after as long career. With one of the most outstanding casts (each utilized to the fullest, even in the smaller roles), a vignette style story, and an amazing performance from Ralph Fiennes, Budapest had my attention from beginning to end. The reason it's not higher on this list is because there were a few that had my attention a little bit more. And that's definitely tough in this case.  Read our review of The Grand Budapest Hotel here. 5. The Interview Say what you will about whether or not The Interview "deserved" all of the problems it caused, or whether or not it's some stupid exercise of free speech, underneath all of the drama, The Interview was the funnest experience I had last year. It's not some grand satire of North Korea's politics, nor is it your patriotic duty to witness it unfold, but you'd do yourself a disservice by missing out. Well tuned humor, great performances (with some of the best James Franco faces) led by Randall Park, and an explosive finale you're sure to remember. The Interview is a firework. Boom, boom, boom.  Read our review of The Interview here. 4. Whiplash On the opposite end of the spectrum is Whiplash. A film I had no idea existed full of darkness. Yet, that darkness is truly compelling. J.K. Simmons is a fantastic lead (if you tell me Miles Teller is the lead, I will politely ask you to leave) with a performance that's striking, violent, and full of the best kind of black humor. Imagine if his turn as J. Jonah Jameson in Spider-Man was even more aggressive, and you've got Whiplash. Backing up Simmons is a truly great film that's more about a bloody need to prove you're the best. Intense, rich, and has an a different kind of explosive finale.  Read our review of Whiplash here. 3. Obvious Child  Within a year so full of men that even the cartoons resemble our landscape, Obvious Child stood out from the outset. I've always loved comedienne Jenny Slate as she's great at creating tragically trashy characters,  but I was just waiting for her to break out. And the wait's been worth it. Based off a short film of the same name, Obvious Child tackles not often spoken topics like womanhood, abortion, and late twenties uncertainty with not only tact, but a sophisticated and illuminating point of view with often hilarious results. Jenny Slate is a dynamo as Donna Stern, and the film ending's blend of awkwardness and hope still gives me chills.  2. Palo Alto As James Franco continues to branch out, some of his projects don't go over so well but are nonetheless interesting. His collection of short stories, Palo Alto, and its adaptation got some attention a few months back because Franco himself inadvertently hit on an underage girl on Instagram. That's the only reason I knew about the project, and now I realize how wrong I was. Palo Alto is f**king fantastic for all involved. A well realized weave of stories helped established a broken, and compelling world. I was so invested, I couldn't help but want more. Yet, we're given just the right amount of story thanks to Gia Coppola's outstanding direction.  Featuring an eclectic cast with Franco as a creepy teacher, Emma Roberts as a misguided teen, Jack (and to a lesser extent, Val) Kilmer as a lost kid, and Nat Wolff with the most emotionally charged performance of the year. Seriously, I could not believe that the kid from The Naked Brothers Band had some talent. The final scene of the film where he charges into the night has stuck with me to this day.  1. Fury With how much Obvious Child and Palo Alto stuck with me, only one film did much more. As a fan of David Ayer's career, I was on top of Fury from day one. Though my anticipation sort of wavered in the middle thanks to some bad trailer editing, and I didn't think Logan Lerman was going to be an effective lead, once I sat down with the film all of that faded away. Fury is magnificent. Five terrific performances anchor the film's small story within this admittedly overwrought setting. Fury isn't a typical WWII film, and it delivers with a not so typical emotionally charged finale.  And Shia LaBeouf? Thank you for giving up all of that Transformers trash. This is what you're meant to do.  Read our review of Fury here.  What are your favorite movies from 2014? Did I miss any of your favorites? Leave a comment below or hit me up on Twitter! While you're at it, why not check out my Top 5 Animated Movies of 2014, Top 5 Sequels, Top 10 Movie Music Moments, and 2014's Best Dog in Film lists too!
Nick's Top 15 of 2014 photo
I have seen 107 films released in 2014. Here are 15 of the best ones
It was the best of films, it was the blurst of films. Hey everyone I'm Nick Valdez, News Editor here for Flixist and you've probably seen my name on a good chunk of the stuff written here. If not, then I'll tell you a bit abo...

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Get Hard trailer with Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart is... actually funny


I'm angry at myself for laughing
Jan 15
// Matthew Razak
Both Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart can be really funny guys, but the second I heard about Get Hard I figured I'd be driving the other way. It looked like a dumb film playing on all the wrong racial stereotypes just pull l...
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First trailer for Spy brings Melissa McCarthy and Paul Feig back again


Limp-dicked unicorn is gonna be my new go to
Jan 13
// Matthew Razak
Melissa McCarth and Paul Feig are like bestest comedy buddies, and their efforts turn out pretty solid as Bridesmaids and The Heat (Nick was too harsh) can attest to. The pair are pairing up again for a spy sp...
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See The Wedding Ringer early and free


Washington DC, Norfolk, Baltimore and Richmond screenings
Jan 12
// Matthew Razak
Some folks find Kevin Hart hilarious. I find him modestly amusing depending on the film, but if you find him hilarious then you should grab these tickets to The Wedding Ringer because then you can see him and laugh. Pret...
It'ssssss showtime! photo
It'ssssss showtime!

Beetlejuice 2 will take place in the now, will bring back Keaton


Any news at this point is good news
Jan 12
// Sean Walsh
Seth Grahame-Smith, the man who brought us Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, has confirmed that his script for the Beetlejuice sequel will take place in the present-day, will star Michael Keaton reprising his titular role, and...
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VOD

The Interview grossed $31 million on VOD despite piracy


Jan 09
// Nick Valdez
When Sony released The Interview on most video demand services but its own, it was promptly pirated nearly 100 million times. At first it seemed like this news would only deter studios from simultaneous theatrical and VOD rel...
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The Voices trailer delivers more than it appears


Talking animal comedies aren't supposed to be dark
Jan 08
// Matthew Razak
In the realm of talking animal movies there's pretty much one genre and that genre is children's comedies. The Voices is not that. Yes, it has talking animals, but it's also a dark comedy with slasher instincts. Plus, it...

Why what The Interview says about North Korea actually matters (an analysis)

Dec 26 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
I feel like Flixist has become an inadvertent "Interview Defense Force." Between Nick's glowing review of the film and... well, this article you're reading, it seems like we're one of the only places that legitimately thinks it's a film worth watching. I don't like it as much as Nick does, but I'd be a dirty liar if I said that it didn't make me laugh a whole lot. I also think that if all of this hadn't happened, the film would have gotten a somewhat more favorable reaction. A lot of people went into it with the same mindset I had when I wrote "Why did it have to be The Interview?" and their experience was colored by that. I'm more easily won over by stupid jokes than they are, clearly, but it's a bad mindset to start from. And speaking of mindset: If you went into The Interview expecting The Great Dictator, you were just being dumb. I've seen this comparison made (obviously with a "Chaplin made a good satirical film, so this has no excuse" bent), and I think it's ludicrous. Although both of them share a conceptual similarity (lampooning one of the most dangerous men on earth), the work of Charlie Chaplin was always holding a mirror up to society where Seth Rogen's films rarely have much to say at all. They're funny. That's all they've got. If The Great Dictator hadn't been a scathing indictment, that would have been more surprising. But the minds behind The Interview have no such reputation.  Even so, The Interview is different. When you take on a dictatorship, you have to go beyond the surface. Seth Rogen was one of the final guests on The Colbert Report, and the interview came before the shitstorm that saw the film blocked and then canceled and then uncanceled and then released on VOD and in theaters simultaneously. (Quick aside: The ludicrously high piracy numbers are unfortunate not because they represent stealing work from a company that was so afraid of this film that their name doesn't appear anywhere in the credits (though Columbia, whose name does appear, is a Sony subsidiary), but because the idea of VOD day-and-date releases has just been set back at least a couple of years by this. Companies will (not wrongly) use those numbers as evidence that the public can't be trusted. That is a shame. Now, back to your previously scheduled programming:) During that interview, Seth Rogen talked about the research that went into creating this film, where he and others in the creative team read pretty much everything there was to read about the experience of living in the country. He said that they wanted to show, in some small way, just how terrible a place this was. And if we're being totally honest, they don't actually show it, but they do make their feelings on the atrocities clear.  [embed]218772:42093:0[/embed] This film is more than just a film about killing Kim Jong-un. Not much more, but more. Those who say it belittles some of the real human tragedy won't be wrong, but the film still deserves at least a little more credit than it's gotten. I know enough about the fake presentation that North Korea puts on for the rest of the world, with the exact sort of not-real grocery stores that the film portrays, because I find it fascinating. Does your average person, the person most likely to go see a movie starring Seth Rogen and James Franco, know about that? Be honest with yourself. The answer to that question is No, they don't. This will be the first exposure a lot of people have to that. Maybe they'll see it and be interested, going off to read more in-depth books or see other films. It may be used for comedic effect, but it's just something that's inherently bizarre. I can imagine a lot of people looking up whether or not those fake grocery stores exist, and then they go down the rabbit hole. You can argue that that's not enough, and I would acknowledge that the true horrors of the regime are referred to rather than actually seen. But let's go back to the simple fact that this film is a comedy. And ask yourself this question: Would you feel better if a comedy had James Franco running around a concentration camp mugging for the camera? Or actually seeing the millions of starving people? No. Instead of complaining about the film not doing enough, people would be arguing that it's exploitative or whatever. There was no way for this movie to win. It could have gone farther and still functioned, sure, but it's an extremely fine line, and for the purposes of mainstream entertainment, The Interview stayed on the safe side of it. I'm not going to blame them for that. And as mainstream (keyword) entertainment (also keyword), The Interview always had the potential to reach millions upon millions of people. And with all of the insanity that surrounded it, it has likely already been seen by more than a million (legally or not). That fact is worth acknowledging, if not applauding. No film that hoped to document the true tragedy of the North Korean experience could ever hope for that kind of reach. And let's be honest: As it was, this film barely came out. Even in its current form, Sony CEO Kaz Hirai personally stepped in to tone the film down. If it had gone farther, the project wouldn't have gone further. Gore Verbinski's Pyongyang was canceled. It shouldn't have been, but that's fear. The same fear that Sony felt with the film as it is. And as it is, it's pretty tame.  But tame or not, let's think about how it could actually make a difference: The most interesting internal email from the Sony hack regarded someone deep in the government who saw potential for The Interview to be used as propaganda. There are entire groups of people who work to bring foreign films into their borders, at literal risk of death. This is a film that will undoubtedly make it into North Korea. People will watch this film there, and they will see not just a vision of the outside world, but the outside world's vision of North Korea. They will see how the world perceives them, but they may also see something that they recognize, something that rings true. Hell, that's what the entire third act of the film is about. It's about belittling the government in the eyes of it's people. It's about subversion in order to begin the revolt. It's about getting people to see Kim Jong-un not as a god but as a fallible man, one who loves Katy Perry and has the same bodily functions as the rest of us. And that matters, no matter what else the film does or doesn't accomplish. Team America (a better film than The Interview) took on North Korea before, but this goes so much further, and so much harsher. As I've said already, we don't see the true horror of North Korea, but we see a mastermind of manipulation, a man who will kill people at a moment's notice to prove his power. (Of all the things the film doesn't show, that's the one I most wish it had. But then again, public executions aren't much funnier than concentration camps.) And we do hear some shocking numbers, the number of hungry people, the number of workers in concentration camps. It may be more effective to see than to hear, but have the people inside of North Korea heard those numbers? Probably not. They know they're starving or may know others in their community who are, but they don't necessarily know just how horrible conditions are for everyone. Look at this as a film for the North Koreans, and suddenly things change. It becomes a film that is far more subversive than people give it credit for. There are serious problems with its depictions of pretty much any group of people, and there are arguments to be made that it's racist, sexist, and homophobic (though not maliciously so), but it still has the potential to reach people and make them think about the North Korean regime. People see Kim Jong-un as silly, not dangerous. The Interview portrays him as both. That may not be enough, but it is undoubtedly a step in the right direction. That is something to be celebrated. So let's celebrate. Who brought the fireworks?
The Interview Analysis photo
Alternately: Why it had to be The Interview
I saw The Interview because I was curious. Amidst the complete ridiculousness of the past few weeks, thoughts and feelings have been flying around about the film. Outside of the few who had attended pre-chaos press screenings...

Review: The Interview

Dec 25 // Nick Valdez
[embed]218768:42087:0[/embed] The InterviewDirectors: Seth Rogen and Evan GoldbergRelease Date: December 25th, 2014 (limited and VOD)Rating: R The Interview is the story of Dave Skylark (James Franco), a sensationalist TV journalist who specializes in celebrity gossip, and his producer Aaron Rapoport (Seth Rogen). After filming 1000 episodes, Aaron realizes he would like to cover more hard hitting news and after discovering that the dictator of The Democratic People's Republic of North Korea, Kim Jong-un (Randall Park), was a fan of their show, he sets up a one-on-one interview. Then the two are tasked by CIA Agent Lacey (Lizzy Caplan) to assassinate the North Korean dictator.  I've been anticipating The Interview for some time. As the proper follow up to last year's extremely surprising This is the End (as I refuse to count Neighbors' major misstep), I've come to expect a certain level of intelligence from Rogen and Goldberg. Sure their screenplays are littered with crude jokes (and The Interview follows that trend for better or worse), but when broken down, the core of the comedy always comes from a well thought out place. The Interview does not disappoint in this area. The dialogue is tightly written and well delivered leading to some amazing back and forth from Rogen and Franco. As the two tap into a years developed chemistry (that's so fine tuned that Franco gets major laughs from just his facial expressions), the incredible ridiculousness of the premise is digestible. Even when the film goes to some outlandish lengths, the two always anchor the ship and point the comedy in the right direction.  While the comedy is well thought out, there is an unfortunate sense of familiarity however. As some of the better gags lead to callbacks later in the film, it's like the film depends on those gags to survive instead of crafting new ones. To be more specific, there's the term "honeypotting." Interview defines it as using seduction to manipulate (instead of the actual disgusting definition) and while it's a notable gag the first time it's used, it runs out of steam the more and more the term is thrown out during the film. Interview has a bad case of this with a few other jokes, but sometimes they're twisted in such a way that they're funny again. It's just an unfortunate case of becoming desensitized to the material after a while. And without giving too much away, Interview pulls the same trick seen in This is the End (with a small bit of dialogue heavily foreshadowing the film's events) and it's just not as great the second time around.  But when Interview works, it works splendidly. The cast is so well placed. Franco nearly steals the show as his performance is seemingly effortless (as he combines an intelligent naivete with a suave and narcissistic demeanor), but the casual racism given to his character is quite troublesome. Rogen is the literal butt of most of the crude humor, but he takes it like a champ, Lizzy Caplan gets very little to do and that's a shame, but Randall Park as Kim Jong-un is the real take away. His Kim Jong-un is at times humanized, but never quite able to shed the terrible image of the real thing. There are several nuances in his performances that could be easily ignored if you aren't paying attention. From the way he animates his face, to the way he can stare off blankly to the side and still command attention. Park definitely needs to be in more things.  I'd be remiss if I didn't mention the elephant in the room. The Interview has a weird portrayal of North Korea. Sort of non-committal, sort of racist and nowhere near as "America, f**k yeah!" as recent events would have you believe. There's always someone saying North Korea is a bad place, but there's never an offer for a better alternative. Both the USA and North Korea are treated as interfering and destructive entities as Dave and Aaron are just roped into this American plan despite their wishes, the United States is shown to have highly advanced military technology at their disposal, and North Korea becomes a cartoonish hellhole of a country. Yet despite all of this, the film just sort of ends. Sure I didn't expect an intense political discussion, and The Interview does get credit for bringing attention to North Korea's issues to people who wouldn't know about them, but it's weird to be wandering around in this grey area. But at the end of the day, The Interview is still a damn fine piece of entertainment. A concise, intelligent film that marks the maturing of the stereotypical "stoner comedy" framework (taking a crazy premise and sticking two random guys into it) as the actors themselves grow older and more confident in other styles of work and experiment with interesting ideas and perspectives. It's stylishly shot (with some wonderful red "communist" hues and backgrounds), and the soundtrack gives empty scenes poignancy. I mean, I had fun...unless I was honeypotted. Whatever, they hate us cause they ain't us. 
The Interview Review photo
Land of the free, home of the butthole
After a crazy couple of weeks of Sony hacks, full on terrorist attack threats, cancellations, and a last minute reneging, I sort of forgot that at the center of all this mess was a comedy starring Seth Rogen and James Franco....

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First trailer for Entourage film reunites the... entourage


Dec 23
// Matthew Razak
I'm actually the last person who should be writing about the Entourage movie since I never got into the show at all and when I did watch it I wasn't that into it. I know. I'm a terrible person, but Dre is gone so you get...

The Interview getting limited theatrical release, possibly VOD

Dec 23 // Nick Valdez
SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT ANNOUNCES LIMITED THEATRICAL RELEASE OF THE INTERVIEW ON CHRISTMAS DAY [Hollywood - December 23, 2014]  Sony Pictures Entertainment today announced that The Interview will have a limited theatrical release in the United States on Christmas Day. “We have never given up on releasing The Interview and we’re excited our movie will be in a number of theaters on Christmas Day,” said Michael Lynton, Chairman and CEO of Sony Entertainment. “At the same time, we are continuing our efforts to secure more platforms and more theaters so that this movie reaches the largest possible audience.” “I want to thank our talent on The Interview and our employees, who have worked tirelessly through the many challenges we have all faced over the last month.  While we hope this is only the first step of the film’s release, we are proud to make it available to the public and to have stood up to those who attempted to suppress free speech.”  
The Interview Release photo
It's a Christmas miracle!
After all of the hubub and hooey giving attention to a film that's probably super funny, but forgettable, Sony is allowing a limited theatrical run of The Interview on its intended Christmas Day release (for those theaters th...


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