Harry Potter

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Eddie Redmayne will star in Harry Potter spin-off trilogy


He's gonna magic it up in 1920s NYC
Jun 02
// Matt Liparota
Eddie Redmayne is trading in his big Stephen Hawking brain for a wizarding wand. Warner Bros. has announced that the Oscar winner will star in the upcoming Harry Potter spin-off trilogy, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find The...
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Severus Snape and the recut of the Harry Potter movies


You have your mother's eyes
Feb 16
// Jackson Tyler
I love fan edits. I'm a strong believer in the idea that a work of art does not become rigid and untouchable when released, but remains alive and malleable for as long as we allow it to be. They're always messy, and often in...
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Mudbloods Trailer

Trailer for Mudbloods makes Quidditch awesome


Aug 08
// Nick Valdez
Harry Potter has a huge, huge fandom. Spanning seven books, eight movies (possibly more soon), theme parks, and now a real sport based on the fantasy sport Quidditch. While I never liked the Quidditch sections of the story (...

J.K. Rowling writing screenplay for Harry Potter spin-off

Sep 12 // Matthew Razak
Here's what she had to say: Warner Bros. announced on 12th September 2013 that J.K. Rowling would be making her screenwriting debut with 'Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them', the first in a new film series which is part of their expanded creative partnership with J.K. Rowling. The films will be inspired by Harry Potter’s Hogwarts textbook of the same name, and will feature the book’s fictitious author, Newt Scamander.“It all started when Warner Bros. came to me with the suggestion of turning 'Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them' into a film. I thought it was a fun idea, but the idea of seeing Newt Scamander, the supposed author of 'Fantastic Beasts', realized by another writer was difficult. Having lived for so long in my fictional universe, I feel very protective of it and I already knew a lot about Newt. As hard-core Harry Potter fans will know, I liked him so much that I even married his grandson, Rolf, to one of my favourite characters from the Harry Potter series, Luna Lovegood.As I considered Warners’ proposal, an idea took shape that I couldn’t dislodge. That is how I ended up pitching my own idea for a film to Warner Bros.Although it will be set in the worldwide community of witches and wizards where I was so happy for seventeen years, 'Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them' is neither a prequel nor a sequel to the Harry Potter series, but an extension of the wizarding world. The laws and customs of the hidden magical society will be familiar to anyone who has read the Harry Potter books or seen the films, but Newt’s story will start in New York, seventy years before Harry’s gets underway.I particularly want to thank Kevin Tsujihara of Warner Bros. for his support in this project, which would not have happened without him. I always said that I would only revisit the wizarding world if I had an idea that I was really excited about and this is it.”
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Based on the book Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Warner Bros. and J.K. Rowling have just announced, via Rowling's Facebook page, that Rowling has signed on to return the world of Harry Potter to the big screen. Rowling is writing the screenplay for a film based off the Pott...

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Actor Richard Grifftiths dead at 65


No post on Sundays. Hah!
Mar 29
// Logan Otremba
British theatrical, television, and film actor Richard Griffiths has died at the age of 65 this past Thursday. This was due to unfortunate complications following his heart surgery. Griffiths has had a colorful career spannin...
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Ridiculously expensive Harry Potter books chronicle films


Nov 27
// Matthew Razak
We're all set to assume that for some Harry Potter fans $1,000 is chump change for a limited edition set of eight books that chronicle the characters move from the written word to the big screen. There are definitely people ...
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Bond breaks UK box office record beating Harry Potter


Nov 02
// Matthew Razak
It's a tough fight these days between James Bond and Harry Potter for most beloved pop culture character, but Bond has stuck another blow against the young wizard. Skyfall has just broken the UK record for best opening w...
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Daniel Radcliffe is interested in a role for Frankenstein


Sep 28
// Thor Latham
Doesn't it seem like just yesterday that we were watching a prepubescent Harry Potter thwart evil while causing a little mischief on the side? I'm sighing wistfully, in case you were wondering. I was actually worried about Da...
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Warner Bros. has started their Oscar campaign for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Pt. 2, and you can watch one of their new ads for it above. If you couldn't tell from my headline, I am opinionated about it. WB is prob...

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The final part of the Harry Potter film saga comes to DVD and Blu-Ray on November 11th, and you'll only have until December 29th to get it. Warner Bros. is putting all Harry Potter movies on moratorium just before year's end,...

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Trailer: When Harry Left Hogwarts


Oct 19
// Jenika Katz
Guys, Harry Potter is over. No, seriously. The books are done, the movies are finished, and there's nothing else to see. I mean, there's the Wizarding World of Harry Potter in Orlando, but that was started before the franchi...
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Warner Bros. launching Harry Potter best picture campaign


Aug 04
// Maxwell Roahrig
This must be a wet dream for all the Potter-heads out there. An article in this week's Variety says that Warner Bros. is currently working on a Best Picture push for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2. Seriously. Nev...

Review: Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Part II

Jul 15 // Xander Markham
Even if you believe that every movie should be judged on its own merits, no-one could deny the importance of history to this final Potter. As with the book, it's as much a look back at all the favourite moments and people left behind as it is a conclusion to an ongoing story. The Horcrux hunt, for one, is virtually a travelogue of locations from previous stories, bringing with it a sense of finality by tying together every last corner of this deep and detailed world. When the last, unexpected horcrux is revealed, it is an appropriate and fulfilling choice that brings past and present together. Elsewhere that indulgence might seem lazy, but the Potter series is at its heart a story about the power of beloved memories to inspire the growth of the future. At times, director David Yates stages the nostalgia a bit too obviously, unnaturally formulating images to remind us that this is the last Potter ever, but as a narrative being complemented by its central theme and vice-versa, it's a touching success. The inevitable flashback - and after ten years and eight movies that inspire so much devotion, it's forgiveable - recalls how young the three actors in the central roles were when first making their acquaintance, and how much they have grown both physically and as performers in the years since. Rupert Grint has had his gift for comedic delivery and timing from the beginning, but gained the ability to convey the bravery that has made Ron a valuable friend and ally as well as comic relief. Emma Watson was the most forced of the three in Philosopher's Stone (sorry, but I'm not using that patronising American title) but now seems far more at ease within herself and the character, to the extent of delivering a number of clunky lines in a more natural manner than they deserve. As an aside to the scriptwriters, it's already clear how strongly she respects and feels for Ron, so there's no need to have her be so repeatedly astonished ("brilliant!") when he devises a workable plan. As for Daniel Radcliffe, let's hope that he won't suffer from Mark Hamill syndrome and be too defined by his role as Harry to go on and achieve many things in his own right. He has turned into quite the remarkable actor, following ten years under the tutelage of the finest thesps this side of the pond has to offer. There's no need for the writers to put into words the weight that Harry is carrying on his shoulders because Radcliffe communicates it through every aspect of his performance. As with Emma Watson, he fights diligently through some difficult dialogue, but it's a shame that the single line he slightly fumbles is the vital one before Harry must go and face his destiny. Speaking of those great English thespians, Alan Rickman finally gets the chance to do something other than sneer and speak... verrrrry... slowwwwllllly in a sequence near the end when the sadness and isolation underpinning Snape's character become clear. His previous campness (and an early speech to the Hogwarts students really pushes those vocal exaggerations to the limit) end up working in the scene's favour, as it becomes all the more shocking to see him breaking the caricature and suffering under genuine emotion. There's no such dedicated showcase for the others, although most do get a tiny moment to shine: Gary Oldman cameos and delivers his one line with heart-wrenching simplicity, Maggie Smith gets to show Minerva McGonagall's humourous side, and Helena Bonham Carter's versatility shines in playing Hermione in Bellatrix's body (there's one for the fanboys). Whilst his cast are taking their final bow with grace, director Yates and his writers let the side down with some underwhelming work behind the camera. Key scenes never quite feel correctly paced, and a charge across the Hogwarts courtyard during a Death Eater assault (clearly supposed to evoke a wartime battle) falls flat, with the barrage of action and dreary soundtrack - the Potter theme tune is wastefully only played once, over the end credits - coming across as clichéd and confusing rather than harrowing. The overwhelming amount of CGI also robs key shots of their impact by them their evident artificiality. Although I saw the movie in the standard format, certain shots broke the movie's reality by being so evidently composed to make use of 3D. Even by the standards of previous Potters, there's an insane amount of stuff flying at the screen or whooshing and swirling through the air, little of it for justifiable reasons. The final showdown is also needlessly extended and with several crucial changes made to that of the book - how I wish I could do spoilers - which rob the coup de grâce of its power by losing the link between Harry, Voldemort and the Elder wand. (Consequently, the Deathly Hallows themselves are made near irrelevant). In the book, the moment feels tragic and exhilarating because it is driven by the characters and their respective moralities. In the movie, the changes are not only anticlimactic, and seemingly driven - again - by a desire to use a 3D effect, but even go against what Harry is supposed to stand for. It's aggravating that lessons haven't been learnt after similarly needless changes messed up Half-Blood Prince's big ending. Ultimately, as frustrating as those blunders are, they are quickly resigned to insignificance by the end-of-an-era feel that comes naturally at seeing these characters reach the conclusion of the story we've followed them along. I don't think the Potter movies ever reached their full potential - Prisoner of Azkaban and Goblet of Fire came closest for me, but were still a way off true greatness - but have provided consistently solid entertainment and created enough of a bond with their audience that the big emotional scenes work on their own. It must also be said that keeping largely the same cast and crew together for a ten-year project is a remarkable achievement and no doubt a crucial factor in maintaining a sense of continuity and authenticity in how JK Rowling's world was represented on screen, rightly earning the love of a broad and passionate fanbase. Deathly Hallows Part II is far from perfect, but as an ending for the fans it is a satisfying one, and what it may inspire from them in the future is yet more exciting still. Jamie Stone: David Yates returns to direct his fourth and, thankfully, last Harry Potter film. I used to love Harry Potter films, but something about Yates' direction since he came on for Order of the Phoenix that tends to slow down the action to a worm's crawl and then speed it up to what I call "acceptable" just annoys the crap out of me. There were certain action scenes where I thought to myself "That could have been better" and at one point I even said it out loud... Certain parts of the movie were made to punctuate and be a crowd-pleaser, but I felt most of them weren't too realistic. The film is often too cerebral and just slow... Also, why doesn't the effing Harry Potter theme play more? What's the deal, Yates?!? What's this Enya crap? Beyond some niggling concerns, this is not a bad movie. I love the story, I love the characters and I can't help liking this film if just for the narrative itself... 78 – Good. Josh Parker: After eight movies, the Harry Potter series comes to an end with a finale so frenetic that you'll barely have a chance to take a breath during its two-hour runtime. It's easily the most action packed entry to the franchise, culminating in the final confrontation between The Boy Who Lived and He Who Must Not Be Named that movie goers like myself that could never be bothered to read the books have been waiting ten years to see. You may find the final battle between Harry and Voldemort to be a bit jarring in contrast to the breakneck action seen in the rest of the film, but for me it was a welcome change of pace as the final chapter of the Harry Potter saga came to a close. The series has certainly not been perfect, and The Deathly Hallows Part 2 is no exception, but it's still an incredibly satisfying conclusion to a series I've been more than happy to grow old with. Now it's time for me to finally get cracking on the damn books. 89 – Spectacular.
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It's actually not hyperbolic to say that the final entry in the Harry Potter series is one of the most important movies ever made. Not in terms of creativity or technical achievement, but for the many fans who have discovered...

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Nine clips from Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows pt 2


Jul 07
// Josh Parker
Fresh off the heels of the two featurettes we brought to you last week, comes these nine(!) brand-spanking-new clips from the finale of the Harry Potter film series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2. Thes...
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See how to rob a goblin in this Harry Potter featurette


Jun 30
// Josh Parker
You may have already seen the crash course featurette on the MacGuffin of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, Voldemort's Horcruxes. Now from Entertainment Weekly comes this closer look at Harry and crew's efforts t...
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New Harry Potter featurette explains Horcruxes


Jun 30
// Josh Parker
The release of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 is just two weeks away, which means it's probably a good idea to get a bit of a refresher on what Harry and his pals were up to in Part 1 of the two part finale...
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Harry Potter infographic shows billion-dollar enterprise


Jun 24
// Liz Rugg
Do you know just how much money the Harry Potter franchise has made over the years or how far its influence has reached? Well, thanks to Fast Company and designer Mikey Burton, we now have an awesome infographic that details ...
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I need to change my pants now. July 15th. [Via Apple]

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Trailer: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2


Apr 27
// Maxwell Roahrig
"Come on Tom, let's finish this like we started it. Together!" Holy crap guys, this movie looks amazing. While I've never been too fond of David Yeats' adaptations of the Potter books, Deathly Hallows Part 1 chan...
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The novel Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows came out back in 2007. If you calculate that in internet time (which is how I always address ideas), that's like an entire lifetime ago. As such, I've totally forgot almost every...

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Watch the opening of the final Harry Potter movie


Apr 18
// Alex Katz
[UPDATE: Welp, the WB pulled the clip. So much for that! Original story follows.] This is actually a feature from the Blu-ray release of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Pt.1 giving a little taste of the opening of ...
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New Harry Potter poster about as gay as this header image


Mar 28
// Alex Katz
Badass, dude! The final Harry Potter film arrives in theaters in only a few short months. One of the moments we’ve all been waiting for, the final confrontation between Harry and Voldemort, is teased in this newly-relea...
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Take a sneak peek at Harry Potter 7 part 2


Mar 21
// Alex Katz
Don’t pretend you’re not pumped for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Pt. 2, you cynical bastards. If nothing else, the promise of all kinds of wizarding action ought to get those loins a-stirring. Plus, esp...
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Harry Potter undergoing reshoots for final scene


Dec 11
// Bob Muir
Harry Potter is the franchise that won't die. It's not a bad thing, since the books were enjoyable and even if the films had their ups and downs, they were always good for a watch. Still, just when you think the franchise wou...

Losing My Virginity: Harry Potter n' the Deathly Hallows Pt1

Nov 17 // Glenn Morris
The girl I sat next to.. had the book with her. She read it when she could have been entertained by my winning personality. Before the film started I did manage to learn that she’d already read this thing fourteen times. It’s thicker than a bible and it’s only one in a series. Psycho. The theater lights dim and she starts holding her friend and crying. This lasts two and a half hours. My interest in getting her number has vanished. So we begin. The core three characters erase themselves from family photos and the minds of parents. I guess they still live at home after graduating from the University of Blowing Shit Up with Magic. Bill Nighy of the Underworld series is always fun to watch. His face fills the screen shouting of dark times and a powerful ministry. Great opening.  I feel like I’m in for something. Harry Potter is epic . Then the Lord of All Evil sits at the head of a table. I know he is evil because everyone is wearing black and because he looks like a burn victim. His chief concern is killing Harry Potter. He can’t do this with his wand because his wand is the same as Potter’s wand and.. the wands can only hurt each other’s owners.. not kill each other’s.. anyway he borrows someone else’s wand. Cut to a motel, and people who love Harry drink potions to look like Harry because that opens for a transvestite joke. How British. They all fly into clouds where loud noises are heard and we can sort of make out maybe a cloud battle? Harry and the bearded guy from the first movie engage in a Return of the Jedi speederbike chase.  Haha.. For a brief moment we’re treated to cool photography, like a house in the middle of a field that looks like something between Days of Heaven and Howl’s Moving Castle. A couple more of these shots will pop up later in the film and, yeah I really appreciate that because whenever someone talks, I have No-Eyed-Deer what what’s going on. Harry zips up a girl’s dress and the crowd HATES IT. People gasp, they exclaim, and otherwise reject the film for a few moments. “Oh my God! OH MY GAWD!!! Why did they change that??? Whyyyyyy. I can’t believe this is happening.” Then there’s a wedding. I don’t know who’s getting married. People speak of family trees and secret relationships. They use words that definitely are not English and even if they were, the actors are mumbling them. This is what it is like the entire film. A few attempts are made at humor, like how much chick-wizard can hold in her purse. I’m introduced to short ugly things named Creature and Doobie that look like they were animated before Lord of the Rings was written. Magneto stops a train. Characters walk in pouring rain without umbrellas. The trio of Harry, chick-wizard, and redheaded dude take on the appearance of adults and flush themselves down toilets to get to an evil bureaucratic institution. They assault an old lady and steal her locket. This was their overall mission. This was their purpose. I knew this after it happened. The wizards who rarely practice wizardry teleport all over the place for a looong, long time. I wonder why they flew through battle clouds if they know how to teleport, or why they need an Elf with teleport powers later in the movie. The next half hour is scenery. Nothing happens. The red headed kid leaves and then he comes back. They can’t destroy the locket because it’s an indestructible locket that might as well be called The One Locket because it needs to be destroyed and it corrupts anyone who wears it.   Of course they take turns wearing it, and why wouldn’t they? An awkward dance scene goes from trying too hard to be lighthearted right back to heavy. Might have been better just heavy. They visit some gravestones, they fight a snake, they run through the forest, then they get Excalibur from the lake and they use it to destroy the locket, but not before it opens up and displays a smoke-hologram of Harry and the chick-wizard doin’ it. After talk of trackers and snatchers the film diverts to an animated shadow-puppet exercise in exposition. It appears to be explaining the entire Harry Potter universe. Sounds like a while lotta poppycock. The post-pubescent actors are captured but nobody can confirm if it’s really them because Harry has been made to look ugly with a spell.. and it nobody recognizes the other two, including a kid they graduated with. Yeah. Considering all of the anti-Potter periwinkle propaganda being handed out on the street this is about as stupefying as anything. He’s had the same two friends since 2001 and they are people of non-interest. Helena Bonham Carter is, for the first time, not a good actress but the scene is creepy and someone dies. This someone is not Alien actor John Hurt, who doesn’t have a line. He’s just there. He’s just standing there. Why is he standing there? Finally, the movie half ends. Lives are changed in the audience. To me it seems like too many pages were taken from other fantasy books. A whole lot doesn’t make sense unless it is solved by magic, convenient when you write yourself into a corner. The film was well presented some of the time, was Twilight-style fan service the rest of the time, and ultimately made no attempt to recap the series, which I can appreciate. People like me shouldn’t be watching this, anyway. We should read those books or resist the curiosity. Overall Score: 6.60 – Okay.  (6s are just okay. These movies usually have many flaws, didn’t try to do anything special, or were poorly executed. Some will still love 6s, but most prefer to just rent them. Watch more trailers and read more reviews before you decide.)
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Sure, I dig Shakespeare actors and I saw the first Harry Potter without havin’ read the book when it first came to DVD. That qualifies me to review Potter…  six and a half? Or is one half of seven but not th...

Review: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1

Nov 17 // Matthew Razak
I feel like I've been saying the same thing each time a Potter film comes out (excluding Prisoner of Azkaban), and that is that it's good, fans will love it, but it really doesn't do much too stand on its own. This might have been especially true for the last film in the series, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, which was fine, but lacked much of what makes the Potter books so great. Now we come to the beginning of the end. Part one of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is here. The question is, has the series peaked at its apex or has it fallen at the time when it needs to stand the strongest. I'll actually answer that here: this is the best Potter since Azkaban, but you'll have to read on to find out how good it truly is.{{page_break}} The first and most striking thing about Deathly Hallows, is also one of the things that makes it great: this is not a childrens' movie. The book was not a childrens' book. We're dealing with young adults here, and one of the things the books did so well was grow up with their characters. Thankfully the filmmakers had the balls to do the same thing because Deathly Hallows deals with a lot of adult material as Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe), Hermione Granger (Emma Watson) and Ron Weasley (Rupert Grint) continue their search for the horcruxes that will allow them to kill Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes). If that made no sense to you don't expect any help from the film, it assumes you're a Potter expert and dives right in. The simple fact is that death, love, loss and many more adult emotions fly around this film, and instead of shying away from the fact director David Yates embraces it. This is the darkest, most threatening Potter film yet and its all the better for it. In fact, looking back, the filmmakers have been doing a good job of progressively making the series more adult, but nothing has stuck as well as Deathly Hallows. While those who haven't read the books might find some of the plot's points a bit too convenient it's hard to argue that the movie doesn't keep you on the edge of your seat and guessing what is going to happen next. This is especially true thanks to the fact that Yates's direction is fantastic. There are some seriously impressive shots throughout the film that establish a perfect mood for the ever darkening story. Unlike Yates's previous two outings with the series, it feels like he absolutely let loose for this one with some stunning camera work (there are two rotating camera shots that will seriously impress) and performances from his actors that are definitely the best in the series. That latter fact tomight have something to do with all three of the leads having much stronger roles to play throughout the film, but it can't be denied that they're all becoming very good at what they do when it really matters. Despite the serious nature of the movie the film also keeps things light. Humor abounds when it can (Grint has been great at punchlines since the first film), but more importantly action is everywhere. There's even a car chase, if you can believe it. It helps that the movie isn't trying to explain everything all the time either. Because the universe is already so well established it allows for more action and less blathering on about magical things -- though, to be fair, there is plenty of that too. What you won't find in Deathly Hallows is anything that will turn a Potter hater into a Potter lover. Once again Potter fans will definitely be happy with the film presented to them (except for some over protective parents who will assume this is a child's film and get angry when Harry and Hermoine kiss passionately while naked). On the flip side, those who detest Potter will find many of the same flaws they found in previous films. Basically, you'll love it if you love it and you'll hate if you hate it, but if you're just looking for some fun in the theaters you can do far, far, far, far, far worse than Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Overall Score: 7.95 – Good. (7s are good, but not great. These films often have a stereotypical plot or are great movies that have a few minor flaws. Fans of this movie’s genre might love it, but others will still enjoy seeing it in theaters.) Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is a worthy film in the series and definitely on of the best. Any Potter fan -- not to mention anyone else -- will have fun at this movie. It's few problems don't hurt it and David Yates does a masterful job with the film's direction.
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I feel like I've been saying the same thing each time a Potter film comes out (excluding Prisoner of Azkaban), and that is that it's good, fans will love it, but it really doesn't do much too stand on its own. This might hav...

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Harry Potter franchise about to surpass Star Wars profits


Nov 17
// Tom Fronczak
USA Today made a good point today: the Harry Potter series is about to pass up Star Wars as the most profitable movie franchise ever to grace domestic film theaters. They used BoxOfficeMojo for their research, so I decided t...
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Movie Debate to the Death! Best Harry Potter movie so far?


Nov 17
// Tom Fronczak
[Update: Now that Harry Potter Week is over, I want to see everyone's votes! Don't be shy!] Harry Potter week continues! Last week I couldn't resist to poll people on which Toy Story movie was their favorite, and the results...
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Harry Potter Deathly Hallows: Part 1 red carpet livestreamed


Nov 09
// Tom Fronczak
I didn't expect to get press releases from Livestream when I signed up, but they've actually setup a cool inside look at a red carpet event for all the Harry Potter fans around the world.  With Harry Potter Week coming only...

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