Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around


Mad Max

Mad Max goodies photo
Mad Max goodies

Mad Max High Octane Collection and B&W Fury Road coming December 2016


Shiny, chrome, and just in time for Xmas
Sep 15
// Hubert Vigilla
We've waited a long time for a black and white version of Mad Max: Fury Road, and this December we'll finally get it. On December 6th, Mad Max: Fury Road - Black and Chrome Edition will hit Blu-ray. All will be right with the...
George Miller Mad Max photo
George Miller Mad Max

Oscar-nominated director George Miller is NOT done with Mad Max


Says he was misquoted
Jan 14
// Hubert Vigilla
Remember how George Miller supposedly said he's done making Mad Max movies given the 17-year battle to make Mad Max: Fury Road? Turns out he was misquoted by The New York Post. (Such is the nature of reporting at The Post.) M...

Complete List of Nominees for the 2016 Academy Awards

Jan 14 // Hubert Vigilla
Best PictureThe Big ShortBridge of SpiesBrooklynMad Max: Fury RoadThe MartianThe RevenantRoomSpotlight Best DirectorAdam McKay, The Big ShortGeorge Miller, Mad Max: Fury RoadAlejandro Inarritu, The RevenantLenny Abrahamson, RoomTom McCarthy, Spotlight Best ActorBryan Cranston, TrumboMatt Damon, The MartianLeonardo DiCaprio, The RevenantMichael Fassbender, Steve JobsEddie Redmayne, The Danish Girl Best ActressCate Blanchett, CarolBrie Larson, RoomJennifer Lawrence, JoyCharlotte Rampling, 45 YearsSaoirse Ronan, Brooklyn Best Supporting ActorChristian Bale, The Big ShortTom Hardy, The RevenantMark Ruffalo, SpotlightMark Rylance, The Bridge of SpiesSylvester Stallone, Creed Best Supporting ActressJennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful EightRooney Mara, CarolRachel McAdams, SpotlightAlicia Vikander, The Danish GirlKate Winslet, Steve Jobs Best Adapted ScreenplayThe Big Short, Screenplay by Charles Randolph and Adam McKayBrooklyn, Screenplay by Nick HornbyCarol, Screenplay by Phyllis NagyThe Martian, Screenplay by Drew GoddardRoom, Screenplay by Emma DonoghueBest Original ScreenplayBridge of Spies, Written by Matt Charman and Ethan Coen & Joel CoenEx Machina, Written by Alex GarlandInside Out, Screenplay by Pete Docter, Meg LeFauve, Josh Cooley; Original story by Pete Docter, Ronnie del CarmenSpotlight, Written by Josh Singer & Tom McCarthyStraight Outta Compton, Screenplay by Jonathan Herman and Andrea Berloff; Story by S. Leigh Savidge & Alan Wenkus and Andrea Berloff Best Documentary FeatureAmy, Asif Kapadia and James Gay-ReesCartel Land, Matthew Heineman and Tom YellinThe Look of Silence, Joshua Oppenheimer and Signe Byrge SørensenWhat Happened, Miss Simone?, Liz Garbus, Amy Hobby and Justin WilkesWinter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom, Evgeny Afineevsky and Den TolmorBest Documentary Short SubjectBody Team 12, David Darg and Bryn MooserChau, beyond the Lines, Courtney Marsh and Jerry FranckClaude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah, Adam BenzineA Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness, Sharmeen Obaid-ChinoyLast Day of Freedom, Dee Hibbert-Jones and Nomi TalismanAchievement in Film EditingThe Big Short, Hank CorwinMad Max: Fury Road, Margaret SixelThe Revenant, Stephen MirrioneSpotlight, Tom McArdleStar Wars: The Force Awakens, Maryann Brandon and Mary Jo Markey Best CinematographyCarol, Ed LachmanThe Hateful Eight, Robert RichardsonMad Max: Fury Road, John SealeThe Revenant, Emmanuel LubezkiSicarioi, Roger Deakins Best Foreign Language Film of the YearEmbrace of the Serpent, ColombiaMustang, FranceSon of Saul, HungaryTheeb, JordanA War, DenmarkAchievement in Makeup and HairstylingMad Max: Fury Road, Lesley Vanderwalt, Elka Wardega and Damian MartinThe 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out the Window and Disappeared, Love Larson and Eva von BahrThe Revenant, Siân Grigg, Duncan Jarman and Robert PandiniBest Original ScoreBridge of Spies, Thomas NewmanCarol, Carter BurwellThe Hateful Eight, Ennio MorriconeSicario, Jóhann JóhannssonStar Wars: The Force Awakens, John WilliamsBest Original Song“Earned It” from Fifty Shades of Grey, Music and Lyric by Abel Tesfaye, Ahmad Balshe, Jason Daheala Quenneville and Stephan Moccio“Manta Ray” from Racing Extinction, Music by J. Ralph and Lyric by Antony Hegarty“Simple Song #3” from Youth, Music and Lyric by David Lang“Til It Happens To You” from The Hunting Ground, Music and Lyric by Diane Warren and Lady Gaga“Writing’s On The Wall” from Spectre, Music and Lyric by Jimmy Napes and Sam SmithAchievement in Production DesignBridge of Spies, Production Design: Adam Stockhausen; Set Decoration: Rena DeAngelo and Bernhard HenrichThe Danish Girl, Production Design: Eve Stewart; Set Decoration: Michael StandishMad Max: Fury Road, Production Design: Colin Gibson; Set Decoration: Lisa ThompsonThe Martian, Production Design: Arthur Max; Set Decoration: Celia BobakThe Revenant, Production Design: Jack Fisk; Set Decoration: Hamish Purdy Achievement in Costume DesignCarol, Sandy PowellCinderella, Sandy PowellThe Danish Girl, Paco DelgadoMad Max: Fury Road, Jenny BeavanThe Revenant, Jacqueline West Best Animated Short Film“Bear Story” Gabriel Osorio and Pato Escala“Prologue” Richard Williams and Imogen Sutton“Sanjay’s Super Team” Sanjay Patel and Nicole Grindle“We Can’t Live without Cosmos” Konstantin Bronzit“World of Tomorrow” Don HertzfeldtBest Live Action Short Film“Ave Maria” Basil Khalil and Eric Dupont“Day One” Henry Hughes“Everything Will Be Okay (Alles Wird Gut)” Patrick Vollrath“Shok” Jamie Donoughue“Stutterer” Benjamin Cleary and Serena ArmitageAchievement in Sound EditingMad Max: Fury Road, Mark Mangini and David WhiteThe Martian, Oliver TarneyThe Revenant, Martin Hernandez and Lon BenderSicario, Alan Robert MurrayStar Wars: The Force Awakens, Matthew Wood and David AcordAchievement in Sound MixingBridge of Spies, Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom and Drew KuninMad Max: Fury Road, Chris Jenkins, Gregg Rudloff and Ben OsmoThe Martian, Paul Massey, Mark Taylor and Mac RuthThe Revenant, Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño, Randy Thom and Chris DuesterdiekStar Wars: The Force Awakens, Andy Nelson, Christopher Scarabosio and Stuart WilsonAchievement in Visual EffectsEx Machina, Andrew Whitehurst, Paul Norris, Mark Ardington and Sara BennettMad Max: Fury Road, Andrew Jackson, Tom Wood, Dan Oliver and Andy WilliamsThe Martian, Richard Stammers, Anders Langlands, Chris Lawrence and Steven WarnerThe Revenant, Rich McBride, Matthew Shumway, Jason Smith and Cameron WaldbauerStar Wars: The Force Awakens, Roger Guyett, Patrick Tubach, Neal Scanlan and Chris Corbould
2016 Academy Awards photo
Mad Max: Fury Road goes big
The nominees for the 88th Academy Awards were just announced. Here is a full list based on the tweets sent out by The Academy and from The Hollywood Reporter. The Revenant leads the field with 12 nominations, including Best P...

George Miller Mad Max photo
George Miller Mad Max

George Miller says he's done making Mad Max movies


At least he goes out on top
Jan 13
// Hubert Vigilla
Mad Max: Fury Road was one of the best films of 2015. An excellent addition to the loose continuity of the Mad Max series, George Miller essentially gave us a masterclass on the art of the action movie and how you can use vis...

MRA anger over Mad Max and Star Wars reveals the dark side of male geek identity

Jan 06 // Hubert Vigilla
When I wrote about the #BoycottStarWarsVII campaign last year, I mentioned that "the ethnic, cultural, religious, or gendered 'other' is a threat to white male hegemony and homogeneity." I didn't get into it much deeper in that piece, but I've always noticed this ugly sense of gatekeeping in geekdom. By that I mean people acting geekier than thou or passing judgement on who's a real geek and who's a poseur/fake geek, as if there's only a few set ways to be authentic when it comes to geek culture. I've been guilty of that behavior multiple times in the past, but you know what I eventually realized? It's a sign of immaturity and selfishness, and it's just plain stupid. Why not share the stuff you love, or at least appreciate another person's enthusiasm for it? Because here's the thing: that movie, that book, that comic, that game you love isn't yours alone. For insecure male geeks, these outside groups (i.e., women, people of color, newcomers to a medium or genre, etc.) are invaders storming the walls looking to pollute the wells of familiar geekdom with their alien influence. Oooh, scary! They'll bring new perspectives, new ideas, new conversations, and new modes of engagement with them. And if these scary noobs enjoy these works so much that they're driven to create their own work, that means they'll add new characters and new stories and new contexts for the discussion of geekdom. What this means is that geekdom gets to evolve and reflect the actual multitude of experiences of the 21st century. Yet you have these calls for boycotts, you have online harassment, you have violent threats, you have efforts to silence or marginalize different voices, you have these immediate calls to discount a point of view without hearing it out and considering its potential merits. There's no self-reflection, there's just self-preservation. There can be no conversation beyond the prevailing conversation. The echo chamber must be maintained. The "No Girls Allowed" sign must stay by the ladder to the treehouse. Boys will be boys. My friend Michael Carlisle had a great metacultural read on Kylo Ren in The Force Awakens following the film's release, one shared by Damien Walter at The Independent. As a villain, Kylo Ren embodies all the worst male geek tendencies. Heck, Kylo Ren's main adversaries are a woman and a person of color--it's a little too perfect, so much so that it had to be just a little bit intentional. Since The Force Awakens is, as AA Dowd said, essentially like watching Star Wars nerds in a Star Wars movie, Kylo Ren is the worst kind of Star Wars nerd. This is the sort of guy who'd overreact and make claims about white genocide, or spend an evening harassing SJWs on Twitter. All Kylo Ren's missing is an ill-fitting fedora. (Was discussing this with fellow Flixist writer Matt Liparota, and truly MRAs ruin everything, even stylish headwear.) Walter writes, "Kylo Ren impotently thrashing a computer with his big red sword is the perfect portrait of Gamergate." He adds, "If Kylo Ren's buddies in the First Order have a manifesto, don't be surprised if point one is 'actually it's about ethics in galactic domination'." The villains in both The Force Awakens and Fury Road embody aspects of toxic masculinity, and it's telling that MRAs would be against both films. If Kylo Ren is a frustrated neckbeard, Immortan Joe is this patriarchal force of control and subjugation. He controls access to water and doles it out only when he sees fits, playing a kind of gatekeeper. Women are either for pleasure/breeding (his sexual slaves) or used as a tool to maintain power (the milk mothers, Furiosa), but they're never equals. And all he wants is to breed a healthy, pure boy to inherit the ugly world he maintains. Hegemony and homogeneity, all shiny and chrome. But remember, it's feminist/SJW propaganda to say that a petulant Space Nazi and a ruthless post-apocalyptic dictator are villains and that the ideological motivations for their actions are poisonous. The thing is, there are models for better male geekdom in each of these films. Walter's piece in The Independent is all about trying to find a better kind of geek masculinity in 2016, one that's less like Kylo Ren (or Emo Kylo Ren) or his PUA and MRA ilk. Poe and Finn seem like good guys, so maybe that's a potential place to start the conversation of a healthier male geekdom. Angie Han at /Film had a great piece about heroic masculinity in Mad Max: Fury Road, and how Max and Nux embody better ways for men to be. Again, another place to start that conversation. This isn't to say that you can't disagree with a feminist read or SJW interpretation of something you enjoy. I don't agree with Anita Sarkeesian's read of Mad Max: Fury Road, for instance, in which she says the movie glorifies violence and engages in the type of objectification it's trying to critique. Violence is the only viable mode of discourse in Fury Road, and as in many great action movies, there winds up being a disjunction between the violence being aesthetically and viscerally awesome and the violence also having emotional stakes and tragic consequences. (The "heroic bloodshed" genre is called that for a reason.) Similarly, I think a disjunction necessarily has to exist with regard to Immortan Joe's sexual slaves. Since they are on the one hand objectified while also asserting they are not things, the film plays with this tension of images and how they're interpreted, and how competing and even paradoxical interpretations can exist simultaneously in the same image. Ceci n'est pas une pipe (This is not a pipe) = We are not things. While I disagree with Sarkeesian in this regard, that doesn't mean I want her to stop engaging with culture. It's the opposite, in fact. She's got insight, she's got opinions, and she should keep engaging with culture and the way culture manifests ideologies the way she does. Everyone should, and we should have this ongoing cultural conversation with as many voices as possible. And just because I don't agree doesn't mean an opinion has no merit or value. Sarkeesian made me rethink some of my assessments of Fury Road and realize what else might be going on visually, and also made me think about how violence functions as rhetoric and discourse in different kinds of action movies. The point is that rather than trying to shutdown discussion or threatening someone because of matter of taste or opinion, we should get into discussions. Male geeks shouldn't be so frightened of new ideas, and we shouldn't be so insecure about our opinions changing or being malleable either. The other person is not a thing. It's part of being an adult. I've been re-reading Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon's Preacher for a project I'm working on, and it's got some good models for all kinds of geekdom. It's such a 90s comic but also forward-thinking in so many ways. One of the most striking aspects of Preacher is how it deals with the changing gender roles of the decade. You've got Tulip O'Hare, who's one of the best badass women in comics breaking down old paradigms about how a lady ought to act. "So you're a girl," Tulip's dad says to her as a newborn. "That needn't be so bad." In other words, she's not getting hemmed in as a damsel in distress--Tulip is her own woman, and she'll bury a bullet in your face if you question that, and she'd probably be into Neko Case's song "Man." Jesse Custer also learns more about what it means to be a man, and that you (male or female) can make your own way and define yourself. Maybe the biggest takeaway of Preacher is that the pre-existing roles the world has assigned to you don't have to be the way they are. Ideological orthodoxy is a kind of inbreeding, and if you keep that sort of insularity going long enough, you wind up like the Habsburgs. There's a better way to be. So c'mon, fellas. I know a lot of you male geeks are better than this insecure MRA bullshit. Remember what Jesse's daddy told him about being a man: "You judge a person by what's in 'em, not how they look. An' you do the right thing. You gotta be one of the good guys, son, 'cause there's way too many of the bad." Man up.
MRAs, Mad Max, Star Wars photo
It's actually about male insecurity
The other day we reported about Return of Kings' limp boycott of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, an attempt to combat the movie's supposed feminist and SJW propaganda. (This is unrelated to #BoycottStarWarsVII, another call to ...

Mad Max photo
Mad Max

Black and white Mad Max: Fury Road may get theatrical release


Shiny and chrome
Dec 14
// Matthew Razak
Back when Mad Max: Fury Road first came out George Miller let it drop that his original intention was to film the movie in black and white, and we might all see a black and white cut on the Blu-ray. That never happened, ...

The Golden Globe Awards have their nominees

Dec 10 // Matthew Razak
Motion picture, drama "Carol""Mad Max: Fury Road" "The Revenant" "Room" "Spotlight"  Motion picture, comedy "The Big Short""Joy""The Martian" "Spy" "Trainwreck"  Actress in a motion picture, drama Cate Blanchett, "Carol" Brie Larson, "Room" Rooney Mara, "Carol" Saoirse Ronan, "Brooklyn" Alicia Vikander, "The Danish Girl" Actress in a motion picture, comedy Jennifer Lawrence, "Joy" Melissa McCarthy, "Spy"Amy Schumer, "Trainwreck"Maggie Smith, "The Lady in the Van"Lily Tomlin, "Grandma" Actor in a motion picture, drama Bryan Cranston, "Trumbo" Leonardo DiCaprio, "The Revenant"Michael Fassbender, "Steve Jobs"Eddie Redmayne, "The Danish Girl" Will Smith, "Concussion" Actor in a motion picture, comedy Christian Bale, "The Big Short"Steve Carell, "The Big Short"Matt Damon, "The Martian"Al Pacino, "Danny Collins"Mark Ruffalo, "Infinitely Polar Bear" TV series, drama "Empire""Game of Thrones""Mr. Robot""Narcos""Outlander" TV series, comedy "Casual""Mozart in the Jungle""Orange Is the New Black""Silicon Valley""Transparent""Veep" Actress in a TV series, comedy Rachel Bloom, "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend"Jamie Lee Curtis, "Scream Queens"Julia Louis-Dreyfus, "Veep"Gina Rodriguez, "Jane the Virgin"Lily Tomlin, "Grace and Frankie" Actress in a TV series, drama Caitriona Balfe, "Outlander"Viola Davis, "How to Get Away with Murder"Eva Green, "Penny DreadfulTaraji P. Henson, "Empire"Robin Wright, "House of Cards" Actor in a TV series, drama Jon Hamm, "Mad Men"Rami Malek, "Mr. Robot"Wagner Moura, "Narcos"Bob Odenkirk, "Better Call Saul"Liev Schreiber, "Ray Donovan" Actor in a TV series, comedy Aziz Ansari, "Master of None"Gael García Bernal, "Mozart in the Jungle"Rob Lowe, "The Grinder"Patrick Stewart, "Blunt Talk"Jeffrey Tambor, "Transparent"  Actress in a supporting role in a motion picture  Jane Fonda, "Youth"Jennifer Jason Leigh, "The Hateful Eight"Helen Mirren, "Trumbo"Alicia Vikander, "Ex Machina"Kate Winslet, "Steve Jobs" Actor in a supporting role in a motion picture  Paul Dano, "Love & Mercy"Idris Elba, "Beasts of No Nation"Mark Rylance, "Bridge of Spies" | Review | Q&AMichael Shannon, "99 Homes"Sylvester Stallone, "Creed" TV movie or miniseries "American Crime""American Horror Story: Hotel""Fargo""Flesh and Bone""Wolf Hall" Actress in a TV movie or limited series Kirsten Dunst, "Fargo"Queen Latifah, "Bessie"Felicity Huffman, "American Crime"Sarah Hay, "Flesh and Bone"Lady Gaga, "American Horror Story: Hotel" Actor in a TV movie or limited series Oscar Isaac, "Show Me a Hero"Patrick Wilson, "Fargo"Idris Elba, "Luther"David Oyelowo, "Nightingale"Mark Rylance, "Wolf Hall" Supporting actor in a TV series, limited series or TV movie Alan Cumming, "The Good Wife"Damian Lewis, "Wolf Hall"Ben Mendelsohn, "Bloodline"Tobias Menzies, "Outlander"Christian Slater, "Mr. Robot" Supporting actress in a TV series, limited series or TV movie Uzo Aduba, "Orange Is the New Black"Joanne Froggatt, "Downton Abbey"Regina King, "American Crime"Judith Light, "Transparent"Maura Tierney, "The Affair" Animated feature film "Anomalisa""The Good Dinosaur""Inside Out""The Peanuts Movie""Shaun the Sheep Movie" Director Todd Haynes, "Carol"Alejandro G. Iñárritu, "The Revenant"Tom Mccarthy, "Spotlight"George Miller, "Mad Max: Fury Road"Ridley Scott, "The Martian" Screenplay Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer, "Spotlight"Aaron Sorkin, "Steve Jobs"Quentin Tarantino, "The Hateful Eight"Emma Donoghue, "Room"Charles Randolph and Adam McKay, "The Big Short" Original song "Love Me Like You Do" ("50 Shades of Grey")“One Kind of Love” ("Love and Mercy")"See You Again" ("Furious 7")"Simple Song #3" ("Youth")"Writing's on the Wall" ("Spectre") Foreign language film "The Brand New Testament" (Belgium/France/Luxembourg)"The Club" (Chile)"The Fencer" (Finland/Germany/Estonia)"Mustang" (France)"Son Of Saul" (Hungary) Score Carter Burwell, "Carol"Alexandre Desplat, "The Danish Girl"Ennio Morricone, "The Hateful EightDaniel Pemberton, "Steve Jobs"Ryuichi Sakamoto and Alva Noto, "The Revenant"   Motion picture, drama "Carol" | Review"Mad Max: Fury Road" | Review"The Revenant" "Room" | Review"Spotlight" | Review Motion picture, comedy "The Big Short""Joy""The Martian" | Review"Spy" | Review"Trainwreck" | Review Actress in a motion picture, drama Cate Blanchett, "Carol" | InterviewBrie Larson, "Room" | Video Q&ARooney Mara, "Carol" | InterviewSaoirse Ronan, "Brooklyn" | Video Q&AAlicia Vikander, "The Danish Girl"| Video Q&A | Interview Actress in a motion picture, comedy Jennifer Lawrence, "Joy" Melissa McCarthy, "Spy"Amy Schumer, "Trainwreck"Maggie Smith, "The Lady in the Van"Lily Tomlin, "Grandma" Actor in a motion picture, drama Bryan Cranston, "Trumbo" | ReviewLeonardo DiCaprio, "The Revenant"Michael Fassbender, "Steve Jobs" | Review | InterviewEddie Redmayne, "The Danish Girl" | Review | InterviewWill Smith, "Concussion" Actor in a motion picture, comedy Christian Bale, "The Big Short"Steve Carell, "The Big Short"Matt Damon, "The Martian"Al Pacino, "Danny Collins"Mark Ruffalo, "Infinitely Polar Bear" TV series, drama "Empire""Game of Thrones""Mr. Robot""Narcos""Outlander" TV series, comedy "Casual""Mozart in the Jungle""Orange Is the New Black""Silicon Valley""Transparent""Veep" Actress in a TV series, comedy Rachel Bloom, "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend"Jamie Lee Curtis, "Scream Queens"Julia Louis-Dreyfus, "Veep"Gina Rodriguez, "Jane the Virgin"Lily Tomlin, "Grace and Frankie" Actress in a TV series, drama Caitriona Balfe, "Outlander"Viola Davis, "How to Get Away with Murder"Eva Green, "Penny DreadfulTaraji P. Henson, "Empire"Robin Wright, "House of Cards" Actor in a TV series, drama Jon Hamm, "Mad Men"Rami Malek, "Mr. Robot"Wagner Moura, "Narcos"Bob Odenkirk, "Better Call Saul"Liev Schreiber, "Ray Donovan" Actor in a TV series, comedy Aziz Ansari, "Master of None"Gael García Bernal, "Mozart in the Jungle"Rob Lowe, "The Grinder"Patrick Stewart, "Blunt Talk"Jeffrey Tambor, "Transparent"  Actress in a supporting role in a motion picture  Jane Fonda, "Youth"Jennifer Jason Leigh, "The Hateful Eight"Helen Mirren, "Trumbo"Alicia Vikander, "Ex Machina"Kate Winslet, "Steve Jobs" Actor in a supporting role in a motion picture  Paul Dano, "Love & Mercy"Idris Elba, "Beasts of No Nation"Mark Rylance, "Bridge of Spies" | Review | Q&AMichael Shannon, "99 Homes"Sylvester Stallone, "Creed" TV movie or miniseries "American Crime""American Horror Story: Hotel""Fargo""Flesh and Bone""Wolf Hall" Actress in a TV movie or limited series Kirsten Dunst, "Fargo"Queen Latifah, "Bessie"Felicity Huffman, "American Crime"Sarah Hay, "Flesh and Bone"Lady Gaga, "American Horror Story: Hotel" Actor in a TV movie or limited series Oscar Isaac, "Show Me a Hero"Patrick Wilson, "Fargo"Idris Elba, "Luther"David Oyelowo, "Nightingale"Mark Rylance, "Wolf Hall" Supporting actor in a TV series, limited series or TV movie Alan Cumming, "The Good Wife"Damian Lewis, "Wolf Hall"Ben Mendelsohn, "Bloodline"Tobias Menzies, "Outlander"Christian Slater, "Mr. Robot" Supporting actress in a TV series, limited series or TV movie Uzo Aduba, "Orange Is the New Black"Joanne Froggatt, "Downton Abbey"Regina King, "American Crime"Judith Light, "Transparent"Maura Tierney, "The Affair" Animated feature film "Anomalisa""The Good Dinosaur""Inside Out""The Peanuts Movie""Shaun the Sheep Movie" Director Todd Haynes, "Carol"Alejandro G. Iñárritu, "The Revenant"Tom Mccarthy, "Spotlight"George Miller, "Mad Max: Fury Road"Ridley Scott, "The Martian" Screenplay Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer, "Spotlight"Aaron Sorkin, "Steve Jobs"Quentin Tarantino, "The Hateful Eight"Emma Donoghue, "Room"Charles Randolph and Adam McKay, "The Big Short" Original song "Love Me Like You Do" ("50 Shades of Grey")“One Kind of Love” ("Love and Mercy")"See You Again" ("Furious 7")"Simple Song #3" ("Youth")"Writing's on the Wall" ("Spectre") Foreign language film "The Brand New Testament" (Belgium/France/Luxembourg)"The Club" (Chile)"The Fencer" (Finland/Germany/Estonia)"Mustang" (France)"Son Of Saul" (Hungary) Score Carter Burwell, "Carol"Alexandre Desplat, "The Danish Girl"Ennio Morricone, "The Hateful EightDaniel Pemberton, "Steve Jobs"Ryuichi Sakamoto and Alva Noto, "The Revenant"
Awards photo
Mad Max, FTW!
All year I've been wondering if the stuck-up world of award givers would actually recognize Mad Max: Fury Road as one of the best movies of the year or ignore it because "action." As the early critics awards have shown i...

National Board of Review names Mad Max: Fury Road best film of 2015

Dec 01 // Hubert Vigilla
Best Film: Mad Max: Fury Road Best Director: Ridley Scott – The Martian Best Actor: Matt Damon – The Martian Best Actress: Brie Larson – Room Best Supporting Actor: Sylvester Stallone – Creed Best Supporting Actress: Jennifer Jason Leigh – The Hateful Eight Best Original Screenplay: Quentin Tarantino – The Hateful Eight Best Adapted Screenplay: Drew Goddard – The Martian Best Animated Feature: Inside Out Breakthrough Performance: Abraham Attah – Beasts of No Nation & Jacob Tremblay – Room Best Directorial Debut: Jonas Carpignano – Mediterranea Best Foreign Language Film: Son of Saul Best Documentary: Amy William K. Everson Film History Award: Cecilia De Mille Presley Best Ensemble: The Big Short Spotlight Award: Sicario for Outstanding Collaborative Vision NBR Freedom of Expression Award: Beasts of No Nation & Mustang     Top Films Bridge of Spies Creed The Hateful Eight Inside Out The Martian Room Sicario Spotlight Straight Outta Compton   Top 5 Foreign Language Films Goodnight Mommy Mediterranea Phoenix The Second Mother The Tribe   Top 5 Documentaries Best of Enemies The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution The Diplomat Listen to Me Marlon The Look of Silence   Top 10 Independent Films ‘71 45 Years Cop Car Ex Machina Grandma It Follows James White Mississippi Grind Welcome to Me While We’re Young
Mad Max is the best! photo
Shiny, chrome, and the best of 2015!
The National Board of Review has named Mad Max: Fury Road the best movie of 2015. Oh hells yes! The post-apocalyptic feminist action movie was previously named the best movie of the year by the International Federation of Fil...

8-Bit Mad Max: Fury Road photo
8-Bit Mad Max: Fury Road

8-Bit Cinema does Mad Max: Fury Road


Shiny, pixelated, and chrome!
Oct 15
// Hubert Vigilla
Mad Max: Fury Road is one of the best and most enjoyable movies of the year. It should come as no surprise, then, that the people over at CineFix have given George Miller's movie the 8-Bit Cinema treatment. Witness the video ...
Mad Max best of the year photo
Mad Max best of the year

Mad Max: Fury Road voted best film of the year by the International Federation of Film Critics


The opposite of mediocre
Sep 02
// Hubert Vigilla
Just released on DVD and Blu-ray, Mad Max: Fury Road is one of our favorite movies of the year and it's better than many other movies. Somehow Fury Road also manages to fit as a badass addition to the loose thematic continuit...
Mad Max Go Karts photo
Mad Max Go Karts

Watch Mad Max: Fury Road-style action with go karts and paintball guns


My world is fire and blood... and paint
Aug 19
// Hubert Vigilla
There have been a lot of Mad Max: Fury Road homages since the film's release (e.g., Mario Kart, Conan O'Brien, Adventure Time). The most recent one that's hit the interwebs is called Mad Max: Fury Road GoKart Paintb...
B&W Mad Max photo
B&W Mad Max

Black and white version of Mad Max: Fury Road to appear on Blu-ray


Silent run as well
May 27
// Matthew Razak
George Miller is officially confirming his godhood today by dropping the news that he demanded for the Blu-ray release of Mad Max: Fury Road to feature a black and white version of the film that you can run with only the...
 photo

Miller Making More Mad Max Maybe


Next film to be titled The Wasteland
May 19
// Jackson Tyler
Mad Max: Fury Road is amazing. It's my favourite of the Mad Max movies, and it's almost certainly going to go down as one of the best action movies of this decade. I can only hope it will be massively influential, too, b...

The Mad Max Trilogy: Look Back in Anger

May 12 // Hubert Vigilla
Mad Max (1979) - Lawless Ozploitation Mad Max, the film that started it all, wasn't post-apocalyptic. It's pre-apocalyptic. The world in the film is lawless and rowdy (i.e., the Platonic form of Australia?), but not the rusty, dusty S&M wasteland that would be seen in the subsequent films in the series. What we get instead is a solid Ozploitation revenge movie, one reminiscent of a drive-in biker picture or a western about bandits hunting down the lawmen that done killed one of their kin. The first Mad Max is an origin story that the other movies will riff on and play with. Max is a leather-clad cop in a muscle car who kills a punk called The Nightrider in a car chase. The Nightrider's posse rolls into town looking to even the score. Revenge, mannequin molestation, eccentric music cues, and general Ozplotation mayhem ensues. When not running down goons and making them cry, Max is back at his seaside house with his saxophone-playing wife Jesse and their cute toddler Sprog. (The hell kind of name for a kid is Sprog?) Home offers a semblance of order in a world that's otherwise falling apart and unable to be saved. Which inevitably means this domesticity is doomed. You know things aren't going to end well for Max and his wife because they have a cute way of saying "I love you." This is generally a sign of someone's eventual death in a movie, sort of like when a character develops a sudden and persistent cough. The police force is in shambles, just holding on to some shred of order like the rest of civilization. After the grisly murder of one of his friends on the force, Max wants to quit so he can lead a normal life. His chief, Fifi, tries to convince him to remain on the force and delivers a key line: "They say people don't believe in heroes anymore. Well, damn them! You and me, Max, we're gonna give them back their heroes." Max goes on holiday with his family to clear his head, which leads to a chance run-in with The Nightrider's friends and the eventual tragedy that pushes Max over the edge. By the end of the film, Max's ordered and peaceful world is gone. He goes vigilante to get revenge, goes full anti-hero in his methods, and instead of returning to his seaside home, he leaves society for the road. Off he drives out into the lawless wild, which is where he now belongs. One of the final shots of Mad Max is our hero driving off as an explosion goes off in the background. That's not just an act of revenge carried out, it's the obliteration of the ordered world. Fifi's line about the return of heroes sets up Max's recurring reluctant heroism in the other films. In the next two Mad Max movies, Max's motives begin as self-interested and self-serving, he eventually shows his true qualities as a character. In the process, he aids in the founding of two separate societies, giving others a chance to rebuild the civilization he's abandoned. Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981) - Post-Apocalyptic Anarchy From Mad Max to The Road Warrior, we go from lawlessness to anarchy. There's no vestige of the civilized world. Now it's a land of bondage gear and crossbows. To get by, people scavenge and murder. Max's badass vehicle has gone from shiny to a dusty matte black. Both the man and the machine are amply battle-scarred; Gibson appears to have aged 10 years in movie-time even though this sequel was released just two years after the first film. Welcome to the apocalypse—ain't it grand? The Road Warrior is easily the best movie of The Mad Max Trilogy, and a remarkable achievement in reckless action filmmaking. Stunt performers leap off speeding cars, hurtle through the air, break bones on impact with the Australian dirt. The vehicles—which look like someone played Frankenstein in a junkyard—are gloriously expendable, colliding at high speeds and creating the scrap metal equivalent of a Bloomin' Onion®. The western vibe of the first Mad Max is here again—rather than bandits out for revenge against lawmen, it's outlaws raiding a mining town—though there's also the air of a samurai film, particularly Akira Kurosawa's Yojimbo. The film follows Max as he tries to bargain for some gas from a small outpost of peaceful survivors. He eventually agrees to help them leave their besieged settlement for a seaside paradise (as seen in postcards). If the survivors were to remain, they'd be killed by the tyrannous Lord Humungus and his band of barbarian perverts clad in assless chaps and football pads. As a character, Max begins to take on the traits of classic cinematic nomads, particularly Toshiro Mifune's character from Yojimbo and Sanjuro and Clint Eastwood's Man with No Name from Sergio Leone's Dollars Trilogy. In Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome, Max is even called "The Man with No Name" by the Bartertown announcer. (He's also called "Raggedy Man," which walks the line between badass and adorable.) We begin to see the recurring Mad Max motifs here: the ripped version of the MFP uniform, the bad leg, the sawed-off shotgun, his car bobby-trapped with a bomb. Max is surrounded by a lot of colorful supporting characters in The Road Warrior. There's Bruce Spence as the gyrocopter pilot, and also a feral child with a razor-sharp boomerang. Lord Humungus makes a strong impression with his bulging scalp, his metal hockey mask, and He-Man physique. The whole look of the Humungus posse carries forward into Thunderdome, and seems to partly inspire the goons in Fury Road. (The influence extends to the pro-wrestling tag team The Road Warriors, later known as The Legion of Doom. The movie also inspired Tonka's Steel Monsters toyline, which featured a hefty post-apocalyptic vehicle and action figure; as a kid, I had a Masher truck, which was driven by a Lord Humungus knock-off named Metal Face.) Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome (1985) - A Kooky Melange As far as sequel subtitles go, "Beyond Thunderdome" is the post-apocalyptic equivalent of "Electric Boogaloo." That and the Tina Turner song "We Don't Need Another Hero (Thunderdome)" are probably the lasting legacies of the film. (Unpopular opinion: "One of the Living," the Tina Turner song during the beginning credits, holds up better than "We Don't Need Another Hero.") Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome carries the series out of its Ozploitation past and sticks it right in the middle of the 80s. And a bunch of kids. Not only is Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome the most 80s entry of the trilogy, it's also the most blockbustery in execution. The vibe is less western and samurai movie and more Return of the Jedi and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. There's also a disappointing lack of vehicular action in Beyond Thunderdome until the finale. Max enters an outpost known as Bartertown (the outback's Mos Eisley) in search of some stolen goods. In the process, he becomes embroiled in a power struggle between Bartertown's founder Aunty Entity and a duo known as Master Blaster. Master Blaster runs the underground pig shit refineries that produce methane, the town's super-fuel. There's a fight in Thunderdome, which is an early highlight, featuring chainsaws and bungee cords and raucous chanting from the post-apocalyptic masses. Thunderdome gets beyond Thunderdome in about 25 minutes, though. Max eventually winds up rescued by a tribe of children who are convinced he's a savior who'll fly them to Sydney, Australia (as seen in a View-Master). Thunderdome was apparently inspired by Russell Hoban's post-apocalyptic novel Ridley Walker, which explains the fractured/restructured speech patterns of the child tribe. The film feels like it grafts Max into this sort of story, and his previous skill set of hard-driving and vehicular cunning are not particularly valuable for this adventure. Instead, Max uses his fists and some of his wits (and a whistle... and a monkey), and yet he feels a little off. It's the difference between the Han Solo of The Empire Strikes Back and the Han Solo of Return of the Jedi—Mad Max goes soft. Thunderdome introduces some fascinating disjunctions to the continuity of The Mad Max Trilogy. Bruce Spence, the actor who played the gyrocopter pilot in The Road Warrior, shows up in Beyond Thunderdome as the pilot of a small plane. It's unspecified if Spence is playing the same character in both movies or two separate pilots. Max's car also appears again in Thunderdome, though it was blown up real good in The Road Warrior. (Maybe it's another tricked-out Interceptor, like a second pair of black jeans just in case?) The story of Thunderdome doesn't entirely cohere on its own either. It feels like a Mad Max tale told by a child, which figures since the story is all about Max helping children establish a new society elsewhere. If we think of Max as serving a function in the foundation myths of the societies he's helped create, this wildly plotted fairy tale version of a Mad Max story might have been entirely intentional. Mad Max's Pseudo-Continuity - A Tankful of Juice or The Legend of Mad Max There are a few ways to think of the loose continuity of The Mad Max Trilogy (and possibly even Fury Road), and I'm glad the series has a kind of pick-and-choose mentality, like we're able to co-create the post-apocalyptic world to a certain degree. Apart from straight continuity, you can think of The Mad Max Trilogy as a kind of loose continuity, with the same character wandering off and going on different adventures, and bits and pieces not always fitting together neatly. The best example of this is probably the Zatoichi films, a series of 26 movies that star Shintaro Katsu as the title character. In each film, the blind samurai known as Zatoichi tries to escape his ruthless past but is then confronted with its repercussions. Instead of a sawed-off shotgun, he's got a sword concealed in his walking stick. There are slippages in continuity in the Zatoichi films when viewed sequentially. In one movie, Zatoichi's sword is broken, but then it's perfectly fine in the next. It's like Max's car showing up again in Thunderdome. Another option is to think of Max as the same character-type/archetype in the films but not the same character throughout the series. It's like the Zelda games in this regard: there's a guy named Link who wears green, carries a sword, gathers certain items, and he goes on adventures. Maybe each Mad Max film is its own discrete Mad Max film, with each inhabiting a different world but with recurring elements and common motifs persisting between the worlds. You can also think of this in terms of Jack tales—Jack referring to the archetypal stock hero of stories such as "Jack and the Beanstalk," "Jack the Giant Killer," and "Little Jack Horner." In this case, we'd have "Max the Mad," "Max the Road Warrior," and "Max the Guy Who Went Beyond Thunderdome." To that, one could also think of The Mad Max Trilogy as a thematic trilogy that's loosely connected, sort of like Leone's Dollars Trilogy. The Man with No Name may or may not be the same character from film to film, but he embodies a character-type that's already equipped with certain storytelling machinery (i.e., the gunslinger, the loner, the ronin). The archetype allows Leone to explore different kinds of stories that are thematically linked. There's another possibility I've been considering that provides an in-story explanation for the inconsistencies in continuity. In this possibility, Max is the name given to a mythic figure who helped various societies try to re-establish order in the post-apocalyptic world. Note that The Road Warrior and Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome are both presented as histories that are recounted by people in the future, each one in their newly established civilization for which Max is partly responsible. Max is a hero in the foundation myths of these new, separate societies. The tellings of a Max story differ since each society is defined by its own values and own history. If the first Mad Max is closest to an agreed-upon canon, it would make sense why The Road Warrior and Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome offer divergent stories that don't fit perfectly together—they're the myths of two societies that have never interacted that share a mythic figure in common. The recurring Bruce Spence pilot may not be the same person, but maybe he serves the same mythopoeic or folkloric function in the two different societies, sort of like the tanuki in Japanese folklore, or the spider in African folk tales, or other kinds of tricksters who manifest themselves in different forms. Miller knows his Joseph Campbell, so I wouldn't be surprised if this is one way he's put his cinematic hero to good use. This brings me back to Fifi's lines in the first Mad Max: "They say people don't believe in heroes anymore. Well, damn them! You and me, Max, we're gonna give them back their heroes." If this mythic read of The Mad Max Trilogy holds, we see Max abandon his own dying civilization, help build new civilizations, and become a hero to these new socities. Max has succeeded in giving people back their heroes, and in the process has helped seed a little bit of hope for the future. And yet the hero at the end of each of the Mad Max sequels cannot go back to society. It's something he's known, he's loved, but that he cannot recapture. Instead, he gives the new world to others. It's like my favorite line from the book The Return of the King, which Frodo says at The Grey Havens: I tried to save the Shire, and it has been saved, but not for me. It must often be so, Sam, when things are in danger: some one has to give them up, lose them, so that others may keep them. But you are my heir: all that I had and might have had I leave to you. It makes me wonder how many other times Max has given up the world so that others could rebuild it and enjoy it, and how many other Max tales there are, and how they differ, as if the new civilization has played a game of mythopoeic telephone with the legend of the Raggedy Man. One reason I think "One of the Living" is better than "We Don't Need Another Hero" are the lines "You've got ten more thousand miles to go" and "You've got ten more thousand years to go." In other words, a hero's work is never done. [embed]219429:42374:0[/embed]
Mad Max Trilogy photo
"The Ayatollah of Rock and Rolla!"
I have yet to see Mad Max: Fury Road, which comes out this week, but I did get a chance to see the first three Mad Max movies over the weekend at a friend's place: Mad Max (1979), Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981), and Mad M...

Mad Max Trailer photo
Mad Max Trailer

Newest Mad Max: Fury Road trailer has all the furious roads


Apr 17
// Nick Valdez
Do you need any more convincing? At this point, you're either as hyped as I am for the next Mad Max or you're super uncool. But if you needed just one more trailer, than the latest one featuring footage of the old films will do just the trick. Mad Max: Fury Road opens May 15th.
 photo

New Mad Max: Fury Road trailer wants to know who's really crazy


The answer is anyone who doesn't think this movie looks wonderful
Mar 31
// Matt Liparota
Seriously, how great does Mad Max: Fury Road look? The newest trailer for the franchise's revival, unleashed on the world this spring, is utterly bonkers. Over-the-top apocalyptic action featuring Tom Hardy and Charlize Ther...
New Mad Max trailer photo
New Mad Max trailer

International trailer for Mad Max: Fury Road


I'm going MAD waiting for this movie to come out...
Mar 20
// Sean Walsh
This Japanese trailer for Mad Max: Fury Road has more of everything I want from this film: more madness. More Max. More, more MORE. The giant Japanese characters strewn throughout make it even more enjoyable. The May 15th release feels so far away. I can't imagine living in Japan and having to wait until 6/20. [via YouTube]
Mad Max images photo
Mad Max images

Newest Mad Max: Fury Road images are still badass


Jan 05
// Nick Valdez
Damn, son. This continues to be my most anticipated film of 2015. Fury Road rages into theaters May 15th.  [via The Playlist]
Fury Road Trailer photo
Fury Road Trailer

Trailer for Mad Max: Fury Road has a road...it is furious


Dec 11
// Nick Valdez
You never know quite what you're getting with Mad Max, and Fury Road will deliver that bonkers mentality in spades. With this trailer (and the one released around San Diego Comic-Con) I'm already won over completely. Stunning visuals, comic grit, and we have yet to see Tom Hardy say a word. Calling it early, 2015 Movie of the Year for sure Mad Max: Fury Road opens May 15th next year. 

First official trailer for Mad Max: Fury Road

Jul 28 // Nick Valdez
Haunted by his turbulent past, Mad Max believes the best way to survive is to wander alone. Nevertheless, he becomes swept up with a group fleeing across the Wasteland in a War Rig driven by an elite Imperator, Furiosa. They are escaping a Citadel tyrannized by the Immortan Joe, from whom something irreplaceable has been taken. Enraged, the Warlord marshals all his gangs and pursues the rebels ruthlessly in the high-octane Road War that follows. 
Mad Max Trailer photo
Furiously cool
Thanks to the Mad Max: Fury Road panel at San Diego Comic-Con this past weekend, we've finally gotten our first trailer for the long awaited, long delayed, long in trouble sequel to George Miller's original trilogy. It's str...

Mad Max images photo
Mad Max images

These new Mad Max: Fury Road images are filthy


Jun 26
// Nick Valdez
Mad Max: Fury Road's production has have been a bumpy road with constant delays, hiccups and whatnot. For example, it's not hitting theaters until next year yet most of the film has been shot since December 2012. But by the l...
 photo

Mad Max: Fury Road production vid shows off vehicles


Jan 22
// Nick Valdez
If we lived in the Mad Max world, my name would be Bruiser Shovelpit, a man who carries around the shovel he used to bury his former pet Goldfish, Jamal (and I would hope I looked as good as Tom Hardy does). A...
 photo

First pic of Tom Hardy as Max in Mad Max: Fury Road


Forgive the poor quality
Dec 20
// Thor Latham
Even though there were initially doubts, it looks like this pic of Tom Hardy as Max from Mad Max:Fury Road is the real deal. Warner Bros. confirmed earlier today that the pic was a keepsake signed by Hardy and given to t...
 photo

Mad Max: Fury Road has finished principal photography


Dec 17
// Hubert Vigilla
Principal photography has wrapped on George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road. The shoot took six months to complete, mostly on location in Namibia and South Africa. The production (with an estimated budget of $100 million) was del...
 photo

New Mad Max: Fury Road info confirms 'Word Burgers'


Aug 17
// Nick Valdez
Although we've known that George Miller's Mad Max reboot/sequel Mad Max: Fury Road has been going through some rough patches for awhile now, principal photography for the film has finally begun. Tom Hardy is still going to st...
 photo

First look at Mad Max: Fury Road vehicles


Jan 12
// Matthew Razak
There's a few key things we all remember from the Mad Max films. Leather, ugly guys, big hair and a bunch of post apocalyptic vehicles that pretty much defined how all post apocalyptic vehicles have looked...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...