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Marion Cotillard

Tribeca Capsule Review: Rock'n Roll

Apr 24 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]221472:43531:0[/embed] Rock'n RollDirector: Guillaume CanetRating: TBDRelease Date: February 15, 2017 (France)Country: France  While making a drama about a pastor and his daughter, Guillaume's younger co-star Camille Rowe mentions he's of an older generation of French actors that her friends no longer find sexy. He becomes extremely self-conscious about his age and how people think of him, and embarks on a journey of self-destructive narcissism in the quest to be younger and more rock n roll. Canet allows himself to be a hapless buffoon as this goes on, and he's completely oblivious to how silly he is. Such is the power of this celebrity vanity. In movies about the elderly acting like younger people, there's a sense of comic nobility. Look at that old man drive like a 25-year-old racecar driver; look at that old man lead a tango with a woman one-third his age. In movies about middle-aged people acting younger, filmmakers often treat their 40-something heroes as clowns. For the first half of Rock'n Roll, Canet sustains an industry satire that consistently bites at Guillaume's ego. He falls further and further into a pathetic spiral of vanity, and can't recognize how pitiful it makes him look to Marion and the French public at large. Rather than learn some life lesson about aging gracefully, Guillaume doesn't learn. Vanity can metastasize. At that point Rock'n Roll shifts from satire to an off-the-rails farce, and I'm not sure it works. Sure, it subverts the explicit and implicit moralizing common in mid-life crises narratives, but are the 40-something clowns that senseless? Or maybe that's the point, and the indictment is about the persistent cycle of oblivious buffoonery that so many stars fall into and never escape. I guess I'm of two minds on Rock'n Roll, and it at least leaves me curious about Canet's other movies he's directed and the tone they strike. I'm also curious about my own desire for moralizing in this movie. Would that have made a difference, or maybe I should I just sit back and try to laugh. But am I laughing with the caricature or at some pitiable analog for so many stars who fell?
Review: Rock'n Roll photo
Vanity in middle age is a bad look
I feel like I might have appreciated Rock'n Roll more if I was familiar with French pop culture and the country's film industry. Writer, director, and star Guillaume Canet packs his comedy with real-life French celebrities pl...

Assassin's Creed trilogy? photo
Assassin's Creed trilogy?

Michael Fassbender says there's an entire Assassin's Creed film trilogy mapped out


Whether or not we'll see it, though...
Dec 26
// Hubert Vigilla
The reviews for Assassin's Creed have been about as lackluster as the box office. Since opening on December 21st, the film has only earned about $11.2 million. It came in fifth place for the Christmas weekend, beaten by Why H...

Review: Assassin's Creed

Dec 21 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221143:43283:0[/embed] Assassin's CreedDirectors: Justin KurzelRelease Date: December 21, 2016Rating: PG-13 After being executed in a Texas prison, Callum Lynch (Michael Fassbender) is held under the control of the Abstergo Foundation, a company that wants to "end violence." His caretaker, Sofia (Marion Cotillard), explains one of his ancestors was an assassin in 1400s Spain (named Aguilar) and wants to use his memories to help Abstergo locate the Apple of Eden, a magical macguffin that would eliminate free will. Lynch is then plugged into the Animus, a machine that allows Lynch to live his ancestor Aguilar's life and gain his abilities. As more of Abstergo's plot comes to light, Lynch has to decide whether or not to carry on the creed of an ancient assassin's group and fight the coming evil.   As you can most likely gauge from the synopsis, there's a lot going on in Assassin's Creed. Like its smooth action scenes, the film's plot and premise move along with a breakneck pace. There's a bit of plot-specific terminology thrown into the film's dialogue, but it never rests enough within its character interactions for these terms to make sense. It's almost as if the film expects its audience to be familiar with the game series, so cool ideas like The Templars and the Creed don't have enough development. Despite the film running over two hours, things just kind of "happen" and often don't get enough follow through to make sense. Which is even more of a shame since the premise does inherently have a religion versus science debate in the root of it all.  But the film does succeed when it takes the time to develop its world.  If you're a fan of the videogame series, you'll be glad to know Assassin's Creed translates one of the series' core elements, the Animus, extremely well. Lynch plugging into the Animus leads to some of the coolest scenes in the film as the machine translates Aguilar's flashly assassin movements in real time. Cutting back to Lynch every few minutes during the film's well choreographed fights may get annoying later on as they take you out of the action, but it's still an initially intriguing and distinct look only capable here. That's also because the film took a moment to establish the Animus which is, as mentioned earlier, a luxury only briefly afforded. But although most of the story is a befuddling mess, it's visually appealing. Andalucia in 1492 is an incredible display of set and costume design, which makes its short time in the film even more egregious. When not covered in a notable amount in dust storms, Assassin's Creed spends the bulk of its time in yet another in a long line of plain, white science fiction sets.  Director Kurziel also films some impressive battle scenes. Although the point-of-view sometimes get lost in the fight choreography (as Kurziel at times can't fully grasp the geography of the setting), they flow well and incorporate many tactics and weapons (which is reminiscent of the game series, also). But Assassin's Creed doesn't have much going on for it beyond its look. Fassbender is, undoubtedly, the standout but even he struggles with the film's script. Failing to give Lynch's words the proper amount of weight as the film speeds on, Fassbender is just trying his best to push on. His scenes with Cotillard's Sofia are also a highlight, but that's only because he has Cotillard's near-deadpan delivery to bounce off of. In fact, you could've scrapped the bulk of Abstergo-set scenes altogether and the film would've been a triumph. Aguilar's romps through a mid-Inquisition Spain are the best the film has to offer, but there's never enough time to develop either Aguilar or Lynch to make any of this matter.  In a film where a man defies the laws of time and space, time is ironically Assassin's Creed's biggest enemy. A lack of time spent with its characters, lack of time spent with its ideas, and lack of follow through muddy the film's experience. In fact, the film seems to only want to translate the videogame series to film without caring whether or not it succeeds as a film. Much like direct to home video videogame adaptations like Dead or Alive and Tekken, Assassin's Creed captures the spirit of the videogame series but won't have the appeal for those outside of its fan base.  Assassin's Creed is such a good videogame adaptation, hilariously enough, it already expects to come back for yearly outings. 
Assassin's Creed Review photo
With flaws wide open
Assassin's Creed has been in the works for a long time. The videogame series' developer Ubisoft has been trying to get the project off the ground since 2011, but was marred with production and release date delays. When Michae...

Assassin's Creed clip photo
Assassin's Creed clip

New Assassin's Creed clip is all about parkour and a leap of faith


You gotta ro-o-oll with the punches...
Dec 13
// Hubert Vigilla
The last clip we shared from Justin Kurzel's Assassin's Creed adaptation had a pretty badass swashbuckling carriage chase. The most recent clip from Assassin's Creed is all about fights, parkour, and taking an iconic lea...

Assassin's Creed trailer photo
Assassin's Creed trailer

Final trailer for Assassin's Creed has new footage, Jeremy Irons, and Charlotte Rampling


Chock full of Irons and Rampling
Dec 10
// Hubert Vigilla
As we're getting close to the release of Assassin's Creed, one last trailer is dropping for the hype. A VR experience alone will not put your butt in a theater seat. The overall tone of this final trailer is different than th...
Assassin's Creed VR photo
Assassin's Creed VR

Assassin's Creed VR experience basically simulates a virtual reality tech demo/commercial


It's like you're really sitting there
Dec 03
// Hubert Vigilla
As Assassin's Creed tries to hype up its December 21st release, it looks like some new technology is being used to sell the movie to you. In this case, it's a virtual reality movie that was shot on-location during the actual ...
Assassin's Creed clip photo
Assassin's Creed clip

Michael Fassbender enters the Animus in this Assassin's Creed clip


Shake hands with the past
Nov 29
// Hubert Vigilla
The Assassin's Creed movie is less than a month away. I'm lukewarm but interested, and at least willing to give it a shot based on the talent involved. The film brings together Michael Fassbender, Marion Cotillard, and direct...
Assassin's Creed photo
Assassin's Creed

Behind-the-scenes Assassin's Creed featurette focuses on stunts, parkour, practical effects


Kick, punch, it's all in your mind
Oct 27
// Hubert Vigilla
2016 is drawing to a close, which means we're that much closer to the Assassin's Creed film adaptation. In this recently released behind-the-scenes featurette, we see star Michael Fassbender and director Justin Kurzel talk ab...
Assassin's Creed images photo
Assassin's Creed images

Michael Fassbender is like "Come at me, bro!" in these new Assassin's Creed images


Do you even leap of faith, brah?
Sep 13
// Hubert Vigilla
The end of the year is fast approaching, which means that the Assassin's Creed movie is almost upon us. While the people over at Ubisoft seemed to downplay box office expectations, this film may turn a pretty decent profit li...
Assassin's Creed movie photo
Assassin's Creed movie

Ubisoft feels Assassin's Creed film is marketing for game's brand, lowers box office expectations


Also marketing for Fassbender's todger
Jul 12
// Hubert Vigilla
The trailer for Assassin's Creed looked promising, what with all the flip-dee-doos and the unexpected Kanye West track. There's solid talent attached to the project as well, with stars Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard ...

Review: April and the Extraordinary World

Apr 08 // Geoff Henao
[embed]220489:42898:0[/embed] April and the Extraordinary WorldDirectors: Christian Desmares and Franck EkinciRating: PGRelease Date: April 8, 2016 In an alternate 1870 France, scientists were being mysteriously kidnapped. As it's revealed, Napoleon III was in search of a serum that would turn his soldiers invincible, created by a scientist who successfully injected the serum into two lizards. Frightened by their ability to talk, however, Napoleon III destroys the makeshift lab and everyone inside. The next day, Napoleon IV signs a peace treaty with Prussia. As time passes, notable scientists like Albert Einstein and Alfred Nobel go missing, halting the advancement of science in the late 1800s. By 1931, the world is still reliant on steam and charcoal to run their machinery, essentially creating the steampunk setting of April and the Extraordinary World. The scientist's descendants are on the cusp of re-creating the serum that would essentially grant immortality. However, they are hunted down by a French officer under orders to kidnap them for enlistment into France's weapons program. The incident culminates in the loss of many lives and the family's young daughter, April, left alone with their talking cat, Darwin. Ten years later, April is on the brink of remaking the serum when she suddenly finds herself in the middle of a dark mystery that ties her missing family in with a secret government conspiracy that can change the entire world. April and the Extraordinary World is a mix of Hayao Miyazaki's fascination with machinery and strong female leads, Pixar's overarching theme of strong family bonds, and the distinctly "French" style of animation. As previously mentioned, the art style is more or less governed by steampunk, giving this alternate Paris a very bleak and dull look that permeates beyond the visual elements of the film. Everything is very detailed and looks technically amazing; however, it just lacks that certain "IT factor" that Studio Ghibli films have. The film's plot is very predictable, even down to the plot twists that you know are coming. Given the film's PG rating, there just weren't many risks that could have been taken with its plot. However, despite this, the film is aimed more so at adults, given the strong ties to issues that aren't important or captivating to the normal child. There's much to be said about the political issues at hand, the sci-fi elements of an alternate universe that runs on steam, and the outdated notions of a modern film falling into an all-too-familiar trope, but that's better left for armchair activists and essayists. While April and the Extraordinary World is a solid family film, I wish it explored its "extraordinary world" more. Given its title, one would assume the setting, which is admittedly the most exciting aspect of the film, would play more of a focal point in the film's narrative. All of this isn't to say April and the Extraordinary World isn't enjoyable, it just leaves you wishing for something truly extraordinary.
Review photo
More like April and the Ordinary World.
Animated films are the best, aren't they? They give more life to their worlds than most live-action films do with their mixed use of CGI and human actors. Even as technology advances to the point where CG characters will be f...

Assassin/Splinter sequels photo
Assassin/Splinter sequels

Sequels already being planned for Assassin's Creed and Splinter Cell movies


The search for more money
Mar 25
// Hubert Vigilla
While the two Ubisoft-title movies (Assassin's Creed and Splinter Cell) have yet to be released, there's already talk about making sequels. Because obviously they want to make sequels, and money. According to Variety, the Tai...
Ass Creed photo
Ass Creed

Here's another Assassin's Creed image with hoods and stuff


Dec 28
// Nick Valdez
Videogame films have been struggling for a bit. They're not as bad as they used to be with studios putting in more effort than they used to, but they've yet to be taken seriously. So far Fox has been making the right moves wi...
Shakespeare photo
The damn spot is out
Get ready for an Oscar nomination, folks. We've only see a pretty dull international clip for the upcoming Macbeth adaptation, but now with a U.S. one we get to see what the film is really about. It's about some striking...

Macbeth posters photo
Macbeth posters

First clip for Justin Kurzelís adaptation of Macbeth


All hail, Macbeth, thou shalt be king
May 14
// Matthew Razak
It's been a bit since we've landed some good ol' Shakespeare on the big screen and even longer since we've had a solid Macbeth so it's easy to see why folks are getting excited for the Michael Fassbender and Ma...
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Xavier Dolan to direct It's Only The End Of The World next


The Quebecois director kicks off with an incredible cast
Apr 28
// Per Morten Mjolkeraaen
Last year at the Cannes Film Festival, Xavier Dolan's Mommy shared the Jury Prize with Jean-Luc Godard's Goodbye to Language, and now Deadline has confirmed that his next movie will be It's Only The End Of The World (Juste La...
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New images from Macbeth


Fassbender and Cotillard are The Macbeths
Apr 28
// Per Morten Mjolkeraaen
It's been a year since we last saw any images from Justin Kurzel's Macbeth, but with a Cannes-screening next month, we've received three new stills from Empire, showcasing Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard in costu...
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Marion Cotillard joins Assassin's Creed


It's an all-out Macbeth reunion!
Feb 16
// Per Morten Mjolkeraaen
Marion Cotillard is set to join Michael Fassbender in the Assassin's Creed movie, according to a Deadline exclusive. We've heard talks and rumours about a live-action adaptation of the best-selling Ubisoft franchise for years...

Review: Two Days, One Night

Jan 09 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
[embed]218812:42122:0[/embed] Two Days, One Night (Deux jours, une nuit)Directors: Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne Release Date: January 6, 2015Rating: PG-13 Country: Belgium  I like Two Days, One Night's premise: While Sandra (Marion Cotillard) was on medical leave, her bosses put together a voting ballot. People could either vote for Sandra to stay on when she was feeling better, or they could keep their annual bonuses. The company can't (well, won't) afford to do both. Unsurprisingly, more went for the bonuses and suddenly Sandra was unemployed. But Sandra wasn't a part of the process, and she must go to each coworker one by one and ask (beg) them to reconsider. There are 16 people. She needs nine votes. On concept, that sounds like a really interesting way to develop a character. At the start of Two Days, One Night, we know almost nothing about Sandra other than that she's really sad. But a lot of people would be sad in that particular situation, so that barely even counts. We don't know why she left in the first place, what job it is that she's lost, or how she gets along with the others at her workplace. All we know is that Marion Cotillard is a good crier, and why wouldn't she be? She's a great actress. As it turns out, there's not really anything more to Sandra than that. Sandra is boring. It was depression that took her out of work, and while that's a totally valid reason to take some time off (she's medicated now), she is hampered at each and every moment of the film by her depression. She wants to keep her job, but she doesn't want to impose on others. She doesn't want to be told "No, I need my bonus more than I need you to have a job" by people she worked with. I get these things, but these issues manifest themselves as a constant game of Sandra refusing to do anything other than pop pills and her husband saying, "Come on!" until she eventually acquiesces. That's boring. And so is hearing Sandra explain why she has shown up unannounced on a colleague's doorstep over and over again. It's an issue of realism: Sure, most of them would not have heard of her new crusade to get her job back, but we (the audience) have heard her little introductory spiel way too many times, and it doesn't change. Nearly every single interaction starts the same way: - Sandra shows up at their house but the person is not there- She goes to wherever they are (usually pointed out by a spouse or child)- She explains the ballot- "But it's soooo much money!"- "But it's my job!" Over and over and over again. It's maddening, really.  So you'd think I didn't like Two Days, One Night, because it's boring and because its lead character is boring, but that's because what makes the film interesting (and ultimately worth watching) has almost nothing to do with its lead character. While Sandra as a character is never particularly interesting (even if the ultimate result shows something verging on character growth), the other people she interacts with are. There are only two possible responses – "I need the money, but okay" and "I need the money, so no" – but the situations that lead them to go from one answer to the other are occasionally fascinating to watch. The one-on-one interactions are by far the least interesting, because then it's just one person begging and the other person accepting or not. But when a third person (usually a spouse) becomes involved and it turns into a shouting match or some other intense moment, then you see what the money means to these people. Sandra needs a job, but these people have structured their lives around this 1,000 Euro annual bonus. It lets them pay their bills or get their children an education. Maybe it lets them do something cool and new for themselves where all of their other income had gone exclusively to the necessities. All of these are acceptable reasons to say no (even the latter, although it's a bit sketchy), and all of them get used. But seeing the way the co-worker (who usually has empathy) reacts versus the spouse (who has no love for Sandra) reveals a lot about who those people are and the fights that sometimes occur as a result are fascinating (and sometimes terrifying) glimpses into the lives of other characters. If Two Days, One Night succeeds at anything, it's at making these other characters feel like they're real people with actual lives. It feels like Sandra is intruding on them and they're just trying to keep on living. And because of that, I kept watching. Would they stick to their guns? Would they crack under pressure? Those questions propelled the narrative forward far more than the overarching "Would Sandra get to keep her job?" Because the film didn't make me care about Sandra, but it did make me care about everyone else.
Two Days One Night Review photo
Cotillard Cried
Sometimes you watch a movie and you immediately know how you're going to feel about it. There's something about the atmosphere that it creates that just strikes you. You know exactly what the film is trying to do, and you kno...

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Trailer: The Immigrant


Apr 17
// Liz Rugg
The Immigrant tells the story of Ewa Cybulski, played by Marion Cotillard, a Polish immigrant to America in the 1920s and her struggle to try and forge a life after her sister is refused entry at Ellis Island. Cybulski is lu...
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Seriously guys, Marion Cotillard isn't Talia al Ghul


May 09
// Alec Kubas-Meyer
Having to repeat things is annoying. We reported this story over a year ago, but apparently some people didn't listen to us. Instead, they put their fingers in their ears and shouted "LALALALALALA." Unfortunately for Marion C...
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New Contagion poster has more Gwyneth Paltrow death face


Aug 18
// Andres Bolivar
I know that it's cool to pick on Gwyneth Paltrow, what with the Oscar snafu, naming children after fruits, and her inexcusable persistence of having a singing career just because she's married to a guy from Coldplay, but I ca...
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This is something of a let down. After the casting of Marion Cotillard and Joseph Gordon-Levitt to Christopher Nolan's Batman swan song, The Dark Knight Rises, there's been a lot of rumor as to who they're both playing. JGL h...

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Marion Cotillard to re-team with Christopher Nolan?


Feb 14
// Alex Katz
Marion Cotillard is reportedly “in discussions” to join the ever-growing cast of Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight Rises. First broken on a French news site, the role Cotillard is ...

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