Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around


Music

Die Antwoord v David Ayer photo
Die Antwoord v David Ayer

Die Antwoord claim Suicide Squad director David Ayer copied their look for Joker & Harley Quinn


The Joker + Harley Quinn + Chappie?
Aug 10
// Hubert Vigilla
While Suicide Squad has broken box office records, the film has issues. Matt pointed out how the problems undermined the good stuff in his review of the film. Suicide Squad clearly wanted to be different things at the sa...

Suicide Squad v Guardians of the Galaxy: A Tale of Two Soundtracks

Aug 08 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220753:43036:0[/embed] Awesome Mix Vol. 1 is an actual artifact that exists in Guardians of the Galaxy. The Suicide Squad soundtrack is just a soundtrack. This difference cannot be emphasized enough. The Awesome Mix is a mix tape from Peter Quill/Star-Lord's dead mother made just for him. A mix tape means curation, careful consideration, that time was taken to make something, and that something personal is trying to be communicated to someone else through an arrangement of songs. In short, mix tapes show someone you care. It's also important that the Awesome Mix is era-specific, with songs from the '70s and '80s, mixing a bit of AM radio kitsch--"Escape (The Pina Colada Song)," "Hooked on a Feeling"--with some Top 40/punk/glam favs--"Moonage Daydream," "Come and Get Your Love," "Cherry Bomb." This marks a time that Star-Lord will never know, lived by a parent he'll never see again, from a planet he was taken from. Sure, the songs are loads of fun, but there's an underlying sadness to a simple little cassette tape: Quill's last connection to his home planet is an antiquated bit of technology and (since few people make physical mixes these days) a dead cultural practice. By contrast, there's nothing curated about the Suicide Squad soundtrack (aka The Basic Bastich Playlist). It doesn't exist in-story and there's a general willy-nilly-ness to all of it. Looking at the tracklist, it doesn't feel like a mix tape made for anyone but rather for everyone and in the blandest way possible. The soundtrack feels like a bunch of songs some Warner Bros. studio exec downloaded on Napster when he was in college, plus three new ones. Those three new songs are relegated to the closing credits, by the way. That's probably where Skrillex & Rick Ross belong, but a shame to waste a Grimes track. [embed]220753:43037:0[/embed] The choices are so obvious, from "Bohemian Rhapsody" and "The House of the Rising Sun" to "Super Freak" and "Sympathy for the Devil." I couldn't help but think of better movies that made better use of these songs (e.g., Wayne's World, Casino, Little Miss Sunshine, Interview with the Vampire). On that note, The Basic Bastich Playlist even has a song from Awesome Mix Vol 1 ("Spirit in the Sky"). That may explain the general been-there-done-that quality to much of Suicide Squad. The movie does things that other movies have done, but it fails to distinguish itself or excel at anything uniquely on its own. The pop songs come frequently in Suicide Squad. The film's turgid, repetitive prologue feels like three different intro scenes in 20 minutes, with a new pop song creeping up every two minutes. Rather than carefully doling out the needle drops to punctuate a scene or create a character leitmotif, Ayer and his editors feel like cheap wedding DJs looking for a quick reaction from the crowd. "Want some tension and attitude in a scene lacking both? Here's 'Seven Nation Army' and 'Without Me.' Now get ready for the dollar dance." I'm surprised they didn't play "We Are Family," "I Will Survive," and "The Macarena" at some point. The overuse of licensed music is probably the result of the reshoots and subsequent re-edits of the film prior to release. Warner Bros. suits felt like audiences wanted a movie like the first Suicide Squad trailer, so they added more comedy and hired a company that specializes in editing trailers to rework the movie. Consequently, Suicide Squad feels more like a series of trailers than an actual cinematic story. Coming back to the Awesome Mix, I think it just emphasizes the main problem with Suicide Squad, and perhaps even WB/DC as they try to rush their own cinematic universe. The Awesome Mix is a compelling component of a story in which lonely characters join to form a surrogate family. The Basic Bastich Playlist is something a studio used to distract audiences from a story that barely even holds together.
Squad v Guardians photo
Basic Bastich Playlist v Awesome Mix
As Matt pointed out in his review, Suicide Squad feels like two movies clumsily stitched together. One movie (the better movie) is a grim Dirty Dozen/Wild Bunch homage about bad guys fighting even worse guys. That sounds righ...

AINT NO MERCY photo
AINT NO MERCY

Watch Jared Leto's Joker hang out with Skrillex and Rick Ross for 'Purple Lambourghini' video


AIN'T NO MERCY AIN'T AIN'T AI-
Aug 08
// Nick Valdez
Suicide Squad has come and gone. Breaking August opening records, failing critically for the most part (although our Editor-in-Chief Matt was more level headed than most), and had so many editors in the editing room (accordin...
Ghostbusters photo
Ghostbusters

Listen to the new and terrible Ghostbusters theme from Fall Out Boy and Missy Elliott


Eh eh eh eh eh eh eh eh eh eh eh eh eh
Jun 23
// Nick Valdez
Regardless of how you feel about the Ghosbusters or the upcoming reboot (which I hope succeeds so we get more movies like it), we can all at least agree that the original film's theme was pretty good right? In terms of recogn...

Batman v Superman score photo
Batman v Superman score

Boogie down to the Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice score by Hans Zimmer and Junkie XL


Do the Batusi!
Mar 18
// Hubert Vigilla
Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice comes out next week (March 25th), and whether Warner Bros suits are worried or not so worried, the film will make a big splash at the box office. We just learned that you can listen to the entire Batman v Superman soundtrack via Spotify. The score is by venerable BWAAAAMer Hans Zimmer and Junkie XL of Mad Max: Fury Road fame. Give the score a listen below.
John Carpenter new music photo
John Carpenter new music

John Carpenter releases new song from Lost Themes II, announces US tour dates


This is your new jam
Feb 17
// Hubert Vigilla
We mentioned not too long ago that horror maestro John Carpenter is working on a new album and will play a few live shows. Well, the first track from Lost Themes II came out earlier today and it's called "Distant Dream." The ...
New John Carpenter album photo
New John Carpenter album

John Carpenter's Lost Themes II coming in April, with live shows and possible US tour dates


If I were a carpenter...
Feb 01
// Hubert Vigilla
Last year, horror maestro John Carpenter released the album Lost Themes, a collection of original compositions that could have come from one of his movies. If you loved Lost Themes, you'll be happy to know that a new Carpente...
David Bowie: Sound/Vision photo
David Bowie: Sound/Vision

NYC: Paley Center starts David Bowie: Sound + Vision series this weekend


To honor the life of David Bowie
Jan 14
// Hubert Vigilla
David Bowie's death just days after the release of Blackstar was a painful shock to many. To celebrate his life, The Paley Center for Media in New York will reprise its 2002 screening series David Bowie: Sound + Vision. Takin...

RIP David Bowie (1947-2016)

Jan 11 // Hubert Vigilla
RIP David Bowie photo
There's a starman waiting in the sky
David Bowie passed away yesterday after an 18-month battle with cancer. He was 69 years old. It's unreal to write those sentences, and it's enough to bring tears to my eyes, but David Bowie is dead. This is just days after th...

The Get Down photo
The Get Down

Watch the trailer for The Get Down, Baz Luhrmann's Netflix series on disco and the birth of hip-hop


Recreating New York City in the 1970s
Jan 08
// Hubert Vigilla
There's a lot of romance surrounding New York in the 1970s even though it wasn't necessarily the place you'd want to live. Crime, poverty, economic collapse, garbage strikes, tenement arson to collect insurance money. Then ag...
Radiohead Bond theme photo
Radiohead Bond theme

Listen to Radiohead's unused James Bond theme song for Spectre


A Christmas gift to you from Radiohead
Dec 26
// Hubert Vigilla
Spectre was sort of wonky as recent Bond movies go. The film was full of Bond callbacks, particularly to the Roger Moore era, which was nice for a cheap nostalgia pop but a big step backwards after the strengths of Skyfall. O...

Review: Junun

Oct 09 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]219966:42655:0[/embed] JununDirector: Paul Thomas AndersonRating: NRRelease Date: October 9, 2015 (MUBI) Junun is all about the music being made, so much so that the filmmaking seems a secondary concern. While multiple angles are covered during the recording sessions, we still see cameras suddenly picked up and repositioned, and get views of the ornately designed ceilings of the fort in the process. It sets the viewer down among the musicians as they perform or just outside the room looking in. There are a few humorous moments, like when a pesky pigeon winds up in the room, and there are moments of downtime when the musicians wait for rolling blackouts to pass. Occasionally Anderson offers a sublime cinematic flourish, like a drone shot of dozens of falcons swirling around the top of the fort as a man tosses them bits of meat. In the sunset and sunrise, Rajasthan looks gorgeous--gold skies, and many of the buildings an inviting blue--and a few times in Junun there are excursions into the bustle of the city itself. Anderson returns continually to the music--and more so the members of the Rajasthan Express and Tzur than Greenwood--blanketing the film in the songs from end to end. The collaborative compositions are mesmerizing, structured on galloping percussion, repetition and variation, and virtuosic touches. It might be a testament to the music that it elevates many of the images that would seem otherwise too much like home movie fare. The falcon shot might be the best marriage of sound and vision, though the music also invigorates plain moments walking the streets or shooting the people of Rajasthan from a tuk-tuk. I caught Junun in the Walter Reade Theater. The music resounded through the space and the seats. It made me wonder how different my experience would have been if I watched it via the VOD service MUBI. Something visceral might be lost from the big screen to the laptop, and unless you've got a really good sound system, it might fail to have the same impact. But Junun is worth a watch, or even just worth a listen, and not because it's a new Paul Thomas Anderson movie. It's more like a Paul Thomas Anderson music recommendation--check these guys out. It might be the first of his movies you can just play in the background.
Review: Junun photo
It's about the music (film is secondary)
How do you review a home movie with a great soundtrack? In a lot of ways that's precisely what Paul Thomas Anderson's Junun is. Anderson shot the footage earlier this year, chronicling a month-long recording session between R...

Spectre photo
Spectre

Listen to Sam Smith's Spectre theme, "Writing's on the Wall"


Sep 25
// Nick Valdez
"Skyfall" > "You Know My Name" > "Another Way to Die" > "Writing's On the Wall" 
Steven Universe photo
Steven Universe

Steven Universe's extended opening theme is the best


Watch it already!
Sep 10
// Nick Valdez
Over the last year, Steven Universe has blown up to magnificent proportions on Cartoon Network. It was confident enough in its long game to build a literal "universe" of well rounded characters, strong and more adult themes (...
Bond, James Bond photo
Bond, James Bond

Sam Smith to sing Spectre's title song


One step closer to release
Sep 08
// Matthew Razak
It's a time honored tradition that some big artist belts out a title song for a Bond film (except for the all orchestral opening to On Her Majesty's Secret Service). In the past the songs became massive hits, but Bond had had...
Tower Records documentary photo
Tower Records documentary

Trailer: All Things Must Pass covers the rise and fall of Tower Records


Remembering the big chain record store
Aug 31
// Hubert Vigilla
If you were a teenager before the 2000s and lived in a decently sized town or city, chances are you went to a Tower Records. Tower used to be one of my go-to spots to buy/browse music while I was a high school kid in the Bay ...
Jem Movie photo
Jem Movie

Listen to the Jem movie's first original song "Youngblood"


Outrageous?
Aug 14
// Nick Valdez
I'm rooting for Jem and the Holograms. Firstly because there's a good chance this film will inspire other films like it, and we need more girl power band films, and secondly, I don't feel like we've got a good look at the fi...
Horror major key photo
Horror major key

Listen to horror movie/TV theme songs redone in a major key


Like a spooky dentist's office
Aug 12
// Hubert Vigilla
Some of the most iconic horror movie scores are creepy in and of themselves. Listen to "Tubular Bells" from The Exorcist and it recalls Linda Blair's scarred face and twisting noggin. Or listen to John Carpenter's theme from ...
Eden photo
Eden

Latest trailer for Eden is a celebration of music and club culture


Lose yourself to dance!
May 15
// Per Morten Mjolkeraaen
While you may not know Mia Hansen-Løve yet, her husband, and dare I say muse, Olivier Assayas is certainly more recognisable. As a fan of them both, it is easy to see how they inspire the best in each other, and with E...
Baby Driver casting photo
Baby Driver casting

Lily James cast in Edgar Wrights Baby Driver


Still not Ant-Man
May 08
// Matthew Razak
Edgar Wright promptly moved on from Ant-Man -- even though the rest of us are still sad about it -- and dove into some more awesome original content with his next film Baby Driver, which will be led by Ansel Elgort as dr...
 photo

Hawkeye sings and it is beautiful


We love you Hawkeye
Apr 29
// Matthew Razak
Hawkeye takes a lot of crap, though after everyone sees Avengers: Age of Ultron that might change as he's surprisingly one of the film's bed rocks. You can learn just how super he really is now that he's finally sat down and sung all his super powers to the world. So much more than an archer. 
 photo

Alexandre Desplat set to score Star Wars: Rogue One spinoff


A Star Wars that sounds as pleasant as a Wes Anderson film
Mar 18
// John-Charles Holmes
With a new trilogy on the way and a standalone feature, Star Wars is becoming "new" again... again. Most excited fans are eagerly awaiting The Force Awakens this holiday, but there also has also been a little detail on the si...
Compton Trailer photo
Compton Trailer

First trailer for N.W.A. biopic Straight Outta Compton


Feb 09
// Nick Valdez
I'm normally not a fan of biopics as they're usually hokey, but this first Red Band trailer for N.W.A.'s biopic Straight Outta Compton looks much better than other other ones out right now. It doesn't seem cheesy like those ...

Nick's Top 10 Movie Music Moments of 2014

Jan 14 // Nick Valdez
Honorable Mentions: Birdman - Flight scene, Snowpiercer - "What happens if the engine stops?," The Skeleton Twins - "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now," 22 Jump Street - "Ass-n-Titties," Into the Woods - "Agony" [embed]218773:42129:0[/embed] 10. The Hunger Games Mockingjay - Part 1 - "The Hanging Tree" as performed by Jennifer Lawrence Every year there seems to be a song that's meant to break into mainstream pop. Usually by happenstance, or some kind of weird popularity spike, and "The Hanging Tree" is 2014's single. Written by the Lumineers (with influence from the original text), and given an odd dance backing so it can be played on the radio, this moment may have been forced but it did show off the first actual rebellion against the Capitol. Like other parts of Mockingjay - Part 1, the scene finally opens up the world beyond Katniss and her compatriots.  [embed]218773:42130:0[/embed] 9. The Lego Movie - "Everything is Awesome/(Untitled) Self Portrait"  "Everything is awesome, everything is cool when your part of a team" was 2014's "Let It Go." There's a dollar theater in my town next to the local grocery, and when I first heard a little girl singing that song, I knew we had a winner. The scene it's used in doesn't hit perfect status until the "12 Hours Later" bit but it's still very good. Even better? Batman's demo tape, "DARKNESS! NO PARENTS!" [embed]218773:42132:0[/embed] 8. Guardians of the Galaxy - "Come And Get Your Love"  As critics like myself (although I'd like to think I'm as far from that definition as possible) continue to worry over the staleness of Marvel's films, the intro to Guardians of the Galaxy, featuring a nonchalantly groovin Chris Pratt dancing to a once forgotten Redbone tune, helps alleviate some of that worry. Starting off on the right foot, this scene helped set the tone for Marvel's future. It's going to be a lot more fun.  [embed]218773:42134:0[/embed] 7. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles - "Elevator Beatbox"  You won't see the TMNT movie on many Best of 2014 lists, but I've got to credit where it's due. It may have be clouded by a bunch of odd decisions, but the Turtles themselves were great. Although they looked like giant steroid hulks, the few times they got to act like their "Teenage" namesake truly stood out. This came to a head in the elevator ride before the final battle with Shredder. It's the most fun scene in this film, and it's completely unnecessary when you think about it. But it's full of so much personality it's hard to care. I want the sequel to basically be this scene x 100.  [embed]218773:42133:0[/embed] 6. The Guest - "Anthonio" The Guest has one of the best soundtracks of 2014. Fusing synth pop and trance together with little known European Pop remixes, and coupling them with a nostalgic run through the horror genre lead to one of the best musically inclined films of the year. The Guest owes most of its successes to its soundtrack and it's never better than the final scene. A stare down, a remix of Annie's "Anthonio," and a sinister Dan Stevens are a match made in heaven.  [embed]218773:42135:0[/embed] 5. The Book of Life - "Just A Friend/The Apology Song/I Will Wait" as performed by Diego Luna, Cheech Marin, and Gabriel Iglesias I think The Book of Life'll be the only time I hear Tejano-inspired music in film and that's a bit sad. Like me, it takes influences from classic pop tunes and unapologetically puts a little Mexican flair into each one. There's too many awesome songs to name (but the one touted as the "big" one, where Diego Luna performs a cover of "Creep," is kind of lame) with the too brief "Just a Friend," and the great "Apology Song" sung to a flaming skeletal bull in the Land of the Forgotten, but my favorite is definitely the montage set to "I Will Wait." It's hilarious, critiques Mexican culture, and it just sounds so pleasant.  [embed]218773:42137:0[/embed] 4. The Interview - "Firework" as performed by Jenny Lane Although the clip above doesn't refer to the scene on this list (as it's much better to experience it without being spoiled), trust me when I say that it's truly a great movie music moment. The scene that launched a thousand emails, and was most likely toned down in retrospect, but it's a damn fun scene. Much like the rest of The Interview, it makes sense in the most absurd way. Hope you get to see it for yourself.  [embed]218773:42138:0[/embed] 3. X-Men: Days of Future Past - "Time in a Bottle" With as many comic book films I see now, they all start to blend in together after awhile. What woke me up from my haze, however, was Days of Future Past. While the rest of the film followed the same beats, and Quicksilver himself wasn't the most interesting addition, I've never seen a better demonstration of super speed. Sure we've seen this type of slowdown in films like The Matrix, but I can't recall seeing it used so humorously. It's the little touches that made everything work.  [embed]218773:42136:0[/embed] 2. Frank - "Secure the Galactic Perimeter/I Love You All" as performed by Michael Fassbender Frank is a film about twelve people saw, and that's a damn shame. It's got some of the best music from 2014. The songs were notably assembled by the cast (and not even available in full on the soundtrack) and they're just so weird. Good weird. While the final song "I Love You All" gets the full bump on this list, it doesn't really mesh as well as it should until you've seen the film. Once you've seen the film, learned of all of Frank's quibbles, then it truly comes together.  [embed]218773:42139:0[/embed] 1. Whiplash - "Caravan" as performed by Miles Teller God, Whiplash has the best f**king music. That finale? So gooooooooooooooood. What are your favorite music moments of 2014? Agree or disagree? Leave a comment below or hit me up on Twitter! Stay tuned through the rest of the week for more "Best Of" lists! 
Nick's Top 10 Music photo
Music to my eyes
Music plays an integral role in film. Easily ignored, easily forgotten, a film's soundtrack is the little celebrated framework of cinema. But when sound and sight marry into a great scene, you get some of the best moments. Li...

Into the Woods photo
Into the Woods

Listen to the first song revealed from Disney's Into the Woods


Dec 05
// Nick Valdez
With Disney's adaptation of Stephen Sondheim's musical Into the Woods hitting theaters soon, the jig is essentially up. It can't hide the fact it's a musical anymore, especially with recent promotional material finally showi...
Mockingjay Part 1  photo
Mockingjay Part 1

Here's that great Hanging Tree song from Mockingjay- Part 1


Nov 26
// Nick Valdez
The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1 was pretty good. It's the best in a rough series and stands out due to some great decisions. But one of the clunkier ones was "The Hanging Tree." A song featured in the book, it was...
Thriller  photo
Thriller

It's Halloween night, so here's Thriller


Oct 31
// Nick Valdez
This counts as a movie, right? Ah whatever, have a safe holiday! 

Review: Whiplash

Oct 10 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
[embed]218258:41786:0[/embed] WhiplashDirector: Damien Chazelle Release Date: October 10, 2014 (Limited)Rating: R  This is "Whiplash": [embed]218400:41868:0[/embed] That song is your litmus test for the film. If you do not like that song, you won't like Whiplash. You hear bits and pieces of the song over and over again, and if your delicate ears can't deal with the jazzy brilliance, you 1) Need to seriously reconsider your life decisions, and 2) Should avoid Whiplash like the plague. But let's assume that you're a rational human being with decent taste in music. Pretty great song, right? It's also really, really difficult for a drummer to play correctly. And so it makes sense that "Whiplash" is a go-to track for Studio Band, the most prestigious Jazz group in the most prestigious music conservatory in America. Everyone at the school wants to be in Studio Band, but only a select few can make that leap. And doing so means interacting directly with Terence Fletcher (J.K. Simmons). The man is absolutely vicious, his rapid fire insults would have made Kubrick proud, and he serves to make a band feel like a military platoon. Fletcher is an amalgamation of actual people. The film was inspired by director Damien Chazelle's own experiences as a drummer in high school under the tutelage of a particularly cruel instructor. But Fletcher is more than that, taking in the worst qualities of instructors that various consultants on the film had had. Fletcher is all of them. He's the worst of the worst. But he's not as bad as Andrew Neyman. If I were to describe Andrew Neyman (Miles Teller) in two words, they would be "Whiny brat." He's an awful person. The worst kind of person, really, because he's really good, knows it, and revels in it. People who think they're really good and aren't are annoying, but they can be dismissed. Neyman is really, really good (more on that later), but he's a total dick about it. And that's a shame, because he isn't just a natural talent who shows up and blows everyone away. He has to work really hard to be the best. He literally moves his mattress into a practice room so he can practice whenever and forever. He plays and plays until his hands are raw and bleeding. Yeah, those are the traits of a crazy person, but so what? That's what it takes to be the best. If he had any likable traits, I'd have totally been on his side. (Especially since I'm a drummer, and I know just how freaking hard that stuff is to pull off.) But alas. Neyman won't allow for anything verging on sympathy. The hard work is admirable (and necessary), but it comes at the expense of his outside interactions and basically anything at all that could humanize him. He wants to become one of The Greats because then people will know His name and worship at the altar of Neyman. Everyone around him just gets in the way. I've met people like Andrew Neyman. I don't like them. And I don't like him. This meant that certain scenes simply didn't work for me on an emotional level. I was rooting for Andrew Neyman to fail, and when things began to fall apart for him I was cheering along. So in a pivotal scene at home where Andrew's family essentially ignores his accomplishments in favor of his brother's Division III football accolades, I was caught between my hatred for him and a feeling of total understanding. Having done primarily artistic things with much of my life (music, theater, writing), I've had plenty of moments where my own accomplishments were belittled by comparison. Not from family, but from others. Andrew Neyman is in the best band at the best music school, and his family doesn't care. That should be extremely depressing, but it's not, and Andrew lashes out in a way that just makes him even less sympathetic. But scenes like that also highlight an undeniable truth: Whiplash feels right. Even though I hated Neyman, he felt like an actual person. Terence Fletcher occasionally threatens to turn into a cartoonish villain (and arguably his final gesture of ill will tips the scales a bit), but he still feels like a person who could exist. Who does exist. All throughout, nothing feels forced or artificial. It's just natural, and it's a testament to both the performers and writer/director Damien Chazelle that my issues with the characters merely tempered my enjoyment of the film rather than outright ruined it. But more than anything else, it's Whiplash's soundtrack that makes the film so fascinating. Not only is the music incredible (if the soundtrack doesn't hit Spotify soon, I may very well be buying a CD for the first time in years) but watching the performances develop over the film's 106 minute runtime is extremely gratifying both as someone who is not particularly good at music and also as someone who appreciates the talent that goes into making it great.
Whiplash Review photo
And all that Jazz
I thought the good folks over at the NYFF were kidding when they described Whiplash as "Full Metal Jacket at Julliard." I've been burned by their film descriptions before, so I couldn't trust something that just sou...

Hungah Games photo
Hungah Games

Here's Lorde's Hunger Games: Mockingjay single "Yellow Flicker Beat"


"Red, orange, yellow flicker beat sparking up my heart"
Oct 02
// Nick Valdez
Although she's been a great contributor on the Hunger Games films soundtracks, Lorde has never got the headlining spot (that honor went to Taylor Swift's "Safe & Sound" for the first film and Coldplay's "Atlas" for Catch...
 photo

Listen to the entire Trent Reznor/Atticus Ross Gone Girl score


Because your ears deserve some goodness
Sep 25
// Matthew Razak
OK, we're all excited for Gone Girl, but how do we hold ourselves over for the next week before it comes out? The score. Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross teamed back up with director David Fincher (they previous did The Social N...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...