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Bad Boys photo
Bad Boys

Bad Boys 3 probably really actually not going to happen


Martin Lawrence still gets interviews?
Aug 23
// Matthew Razak
Three years ago almost to the day Martin Lawrence announced that Bad Boys 3 was a thing, and that it was actually going to happen for real. Well, it turns out that it wasn't so "for real," and that, as with all other att...
Joker photo
Joker

Joker origin movie with Scorsese crime drama feel in the works


Jared Leto to get the axe ... um, acid
Aug 23
// Rick Lash
The Joker's already set to appear in two DC Unilaterally-bad-verse movies: a Suicide Squadsequel, and the Harley Quinn spinoff. Both will reportedly feature Jared Leto reprising his role as Mr. J. Wait, you might be aski...
Guardians 3 photo
Guardians 3

James Gunn says a lot of stuff about Guardians 3


It's going to be the cornerstone of MCU
Aug 23
// Matthew Razak
Guardians of the Galaxy 3 is a long way off, but that doesn't mean that director James Gunn isn't getting things ready. He recently did a Facebook Live chat where he covered every topic under the sun, including reminding...

Review: The Defenders (Season 1)

Aug 22 // Nick Valdez
The Defenders (Season 1)Director: VariousRating: TV-MARelease Date: August 18, 2017 (Netflix) After the events of Iron Fist, Danny Rand (Finn Jones) vows to strike down various members of the criminal ninja organization The Hand. His journey across the world has brought him back to New York, where he hears of a greater Hand plan in action. Luke Cage (Mike Colter), fresh out of prison, is trying to start a new life and build a better Harlem but overhears how a man in a white hat is recruiting young men into doing some bad things. Jessica Jones (Krysten Ritter), still grappling with her new identity as a public figure following Kilgrave's actions, begrudgingly investigates a case about a woman's missing husband. Matt Murdock (Charlie Cox) is distraught after Elektra's death, and has been floating around aimlessly since the end of Daredevil's second season. Suddenly, this new character Alexandra (Sigourney Weaver, the queen) is super important and appears with a revived Elektra and is doing something to New York City. Then these four individuals sort of run into each other and now have to save NYC from The Hand.  The Defenders somehow has everything and nothing going on at the same time. Adapting The Avengers model of eschewing more toward bigger sequences rather than fleshing out story beats, this first season (or only) covers a ton of ground in terms of the narrative it wants to tell, yet it doesn't evolve the characters in any meaningful way. Although The Avengers succeeded in this regard thanks to a combination of novelty and an unforeseen amount of popularity, it mostly succeeds because it's over before you recognize its flaws. This series makes an improvement over the other Netflix MCU shows by virtue of trimming the standard 13 episode count down to eight, so I was hoping that also meant they had a clearer vision of the narrative and cut out most of the excess. That's not the case.  The length of the series collides with how little meat is in the story when there's one too many of the "all of our superheroes stand in a line and look at each other" moments. Less than dynamic camerawork (not to mention how unintelligible some fights can be with poor close-up cuts and shakycam) only emphasizes how little emotional investment there is going into each action sequence. [embed]221845:43744:0[/embed] While there is a unique flavor of fun in these action scenes presented with a gravitas that certainly feels earned yet reflective of the limited budget for the series, after fights happen in the same fashion a few times, they lose that ironically tinged appeal. The lack of strong action sequencing may be a result of the slim variety in the team lineup (strongman, strongwoman, stronghand, ninja devil man), but these technical flaws wouldn't matter as much if this first season spent more time exploring how these characters interact with one another and less time explaining facets of the Iron Fistmythos.  As this narrative is focused on The Hand, it often feels like a season of the Daredevil and Iron Fist show with special guests Jessica Jones and Luke Cage. Charlie Cox is a suitable anchor for this bracket of the MCU, but less so is Finn Jones as Danny Rand. There is a slight improvement in how he and Colleen Wing have been written in this series as opposed to Iron Fist, but focusing another season's worth of plot around his antics feels like a letdown. There are occasions of brilliance as Danny is notably shut down as a whiny rich idiot by the other members of the team (and almost act as a meta-commentary of his series when compared to the others), but the focus on Rand and Murdock leaves the much more interesting Jones and Cage on the sidelines.  It's great seeing Krysten Ritter as Jessica Jones again, and it's crazy how natural she feels in comparison to the others. Mike Colter is fine, but other than one prescient conversation about privilege between Luke and Danny, he's underserved in the role. Jessica and Luke are only tangentially connected to the overall narrative, so the escalation of their involvement feels loosely tied and forced. Their smaller roles yield some great outsider one-liners, but it's a shame most of the time spent in The Defendersis learning The Hand's history and focused on villains of which only three we've gotten to know beforehand.  There's a notable push and pull of time between each episode of The Defenders. The better episodes allow the actors and characters to really dig into their budding relationships, while the worse ones throw all the ancillary characters in the NMCU into a single room just for the credit of having them be there. Each episode feels as if we're being rushed through in order to have time for the next action set piece, but then slogs about in expository plot the viewer has already figured out for themselves.  The Defenders manages to quickly burn through all the time in the world. It doesn't have much to say beyond a standard crossover TV special, but brief moments of fan service and fun do break through from time to time. 
The Defenders photo
Masters of karate and friendship
When the Marvel Cinematic Universe first came to Netflix it seemed like such a great idea. Four individual series of shows focused on more grounded heroes eventually coming together in a small scale, Avengers-like fashio...


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Game of Thrones Season 7 Recap: 'Beyond the Wall'


Aug 21
// Rick Lash
"Beyond the Wall," the penultimate episode in HBO's seventh season of Game of Thrones, concentrates its energies in one place, the north, with much of the action taking place exactly where its title suggests, beyond the wall....

Review: Death Note

Aug 21 // Rick Lash
[embed]456101:69322:0[/embed] Death NoteDirector: Adam WingardRelease Date: August 25, 2017Rated: RNetflix Meet Light (Nat Wolff). He seems to be a bit of a loner. We’re told he’s highly intelligent, so don’t let his actions make you think otherwise: he is. Hold on there, Light? Would you mind stopping acting like an idiot? I’m trying to tell the readers how smart you are! Thanks! Right, really smart Light is sitting outside his high school when a notebook mysteriously drops from the sky and lands right next to him. Its cover says DEATH NOTE. Inside, it says, “The human whose name is written here will die.” And that’s where we start, with a preposterous notion, one that most would write off, and one which Light probably would too, only supernatural phenomena do a marvelous job of helping him to believe, and quickly. It turns out there’s a death god, Ryuk (voiced by Willem Dafoe), who is a sort of interactive guide to using the Death Note and he’s not only helping Light to believe the note’s powers are real, he’s encouraging his every move. Turns out Light is a troubled kid, one whose mother was killed by a man who got off on legal technicalities. And Light’s not much a fan of bullying either. Put these ingredients together with the supernatural power to kill by writing a name in a book and Light’s recipe is A better world, now. With light at its head as the god of justice, Kira. The film’s strength is its ability to condense down the material that comprises the manga and anime into a single movie, successfully. It’s tough to pace the material to this condensed narrative format, but the Netflix team did it with their story. And you must call it their story, as beyond the presence of Light, L (Lakeith Stanfield), and Ryuk, oh, and a book that kills people whose names have been written in it, the story ceases to be the one that you may already be familiar with. Gone is the cat and mouse interplay that made the originals so devilishly enjoyable. Instead, it’s more like lion, mouse, and too much moody music and too many Dutch angles. This is MTV filmmaking if you’ve ever seen it (hopefully you haven’t—does anyone else remembrer the abysmal The Perfect Score?). L lives up to his character history. Clearly, he’s been given the intellect of both characters when it was supposed to be split between the two. But the most egregious error of this story is Light’s giving up all his secrets in the moments after they become his secrets, all to impress a girl. And, once convinced, impressed she is: their first time killing someone together immediately leads to sex. And here, I think the story loses itself. This is not Bonnie & Clyde with a hint of vigilantism, or it’s not supposed to be. Nor, if it were, would only half of the couple really care to stick to their guns about killing the innocent. It’s a diluted version of the original story, wherein Light is not afraid or hesitant to kill law officials if they’ll hinder his plans. This splitting of the personality and character serves to create problems that wouldn’t otherwise exist, and ultimately makes Light a less interesting character. Which is a shame, for if given the proper material, Wolff seems a more than capable actor; his turn at being terrified at the first appearance of Ryuk is amazing—I’m not sure I’ve ever seen anyone act “scared” as well as he does. But, instead of letting him act the cool, calculating sociopath, they give him a turn as out outburst-prone, temper-tantrum throwing teenager who has daddy issues and “behavioral problems” at school. We’ve all seen many versions of that before. Light, the character essence of Light, is above this petty normal stuff. Which is funny, because inside this Light’s school locker, we see a sticker that says “Normal people scare me.” That should be right, but Light is far too average for it to hit home. For those uninitiated in the Death Note lore, this will probably play better than for those already familiar with the story. How well is another question. For those who are already familiar, you do find more than pleasant turns from Lakeith Stanfield as L and from Defoe / Jason Liles as Ryuk. They’re much truer to form and both play their parts well. L’s quirks are by and large wholly believable, feel natural—as much as someone like L can feel natural. With only occasional tics (the use of some sort of neural eyewear to help him maximize the benefits of one hour of sleep) as fails, and those can be chalked up more to poor writing than acting. Margaret Qualley (The Leftovers) as Mia Sutton, Light’s disenchanted cheerleader turned girlfriend makes due with what she’s given, but her own righteousness and willingness to compromise and kill anyone who’d get in Bonnie & Clyde’s way is never satisfyingly explained. Her motivations are utterly unknown, other than the apparent sexual fetishization of violence that we’ve already touched upon. The twists begin transparently and grow in effectiveness as the film progresses, ending on a stong(er) note. But mostly, the deaths rely on gruesome effects that show explicitly what’s happening to people. I counted at least three that equaled the gore found in The Walking Dead’s most violent moments. They were cringe-inducing, and felt in the audience. Perhaps this served to underscore just how real this seemingly unreal phenomena was, but more likely, it seemed an easy out to use shock against the viewers rather than intellect. Maybe portraying an emotionally stable and dedicated high school student was too much the challenge for any director to imagine. It’s true, culturally, the image of Light as such conforms more to Japanese idealism than American. Either way, outside its interesting pitch line, Death Note fails to deliver anything new and truly exciting—it may have been better served as an eight-episode Netflix series rather than movie. Side note: this story takes place in Seattle, yet Light is caught not once, but twice in pouring downpours acting as if he hates the rain; have people forgotten umbrellas in Seattle? Details matter.
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Death Note, the second major Japanese manga to be adapted as a major Hollywood production this year, is facing some of the same criticisms that its predecessor (Ghost in the Shell) did. Accusations of ‘whitewashing&rsqu...

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Box Office

Can August be over yet?


Box office recap
Aug 21
// Matthew Razak
The end of August sucks for movies. It's too late in summer for the studios to care anymore, and it's only on very rare occasions that some studio also-ran or indie gem surprises us. This August especially sucks, with not eve...
World of Tomorrow sequel photo
World of Tomorrow sequel

Don Hertzfeldt teases a World of Tomorrow sequel, life is good


EVERYBODY DANCE!
Aug 21
// Hubert Vigilla
Gosh I love Don Hertzfeldt. The indie animator's handmade, in-camera works made a major impression in the 1990s and early 2000s thanks to shorts like Lily and Jim and Rejected. Hertzfeldt went on to received major critical ac...
Jabba the Hutt movie photo
Jabba the Hutt movie

Jabba the Hutt is getting a Star Wars spin-off movie for some reason


Huttastic Jabbas and Where to Find Them
Aug 20
// Hubert Vigilla
Han Solo and Obi-Wan Kenobi have their own forthcoming standalone/spin-off movies, so why not other characters from the Star Wars universe? Makes sense, right? This may explain Disney & Lucasfilm's nonsensical decision to...
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Your Bad Movie Night Guide, Vol. 5: Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama


I apologize in advance
Aug 18
// Rick Lash
The 80s were a sort of B-movie paradise where creating content cheaply to satiate the demands of home video viewers drove the production of endless films that otherwise might not have seen the light of day. As such, it's litt...

NYC: Old School Kung Fu Fest 2017 is all about martial arts wonder women

Aug 18 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]221831:43735:0[/embed] We can start by tying this into last year's Old School Kung Fu Fest, which showcased the films of Golden Harvest. The one Golden Harvest film this year is 1972's Hapkido, starring Angela Mao, Sammo Hung, and Carter Wong. (Both Mao and Hung made appearances in the Bruce Lee classic Enter the Dragon.) The boys do a lot of the fighting against the Imperial Japanese baddies during the first half of the film, which is set in 1930s China. Mao eventually takes center stage to avenge her brothers and the oppressed people of both China and Korea. Lecherous thugs from imperial Japan and Chinese turncoats generally make for solid baddies in kung fu films set during this time--they're the equivalent of Nazis and saboteurs. The word "forbearance" comes up throughout Hapkido. It's a keystone in many martial arts, and both patience and self-restraint help Mao's character survive until she can exact revenge. There's a scene in which Mao's pride is insulted in a dojo full of goons, and rather than take on all the laughing hyenas around her, she clenches her fist and seethes. Wait, her body language seems to say, or you'll be overwhelmed. Mao's fight scenes are fierce and well-choreographed. Though it's not the mega-quick, rhythmic/metered fighting of the later 1970s and the 1980s (a style that Hung would help pioneer), it's eye-catching for the era and brutal and rooted in story. [embed]221831:43737:0[/embed] Three of the movies at this year's Old School Kung Fu Fest are from the great King Hu, one of the maestros of wuxia pictures and kung fu cinema. The films are A Touch of Zen (1971), Come Drink with Me (1966), and The Fate of Lee Khan (1973). Hu's undergone a major critical reassessment in the west over the years, praised for his lush productions and style. He's influenced filmmakers as disparate as Hong Kong action madman Tsui Hark to staid Taiwanese arthouse director Tsai Ming Liang. In recent years, Hu's films have played a number of retrospectives, and two of his masterpieces, A Touch of Zen and Dragon Inn, have been released by the Criterion Collection. Though I haven't seen The Fate of Lee Khan, there's always been a strong woman as a central player in Hu films I have seen. In Come Drink with Me, it's Cheng Pei Pei as the hero Golden Swallow, seeking to rescue a political prisoner. Western audiences probably know Cheng best as Jade Fox in Ang Lee's 2000 wuxia homage Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. In A Touch of Zen, it's Feng Hsu as a hero named Yang on the run in an artsy adventure that's also about Buddhist spirituality. I'm going to try to catch The Fate of Lee Khan this weekend and see if I can tease out some bigger idea about King Hu and his badass women. Like Dragon Inn, The Fate of Lee Khan is centered around an inn. I'm left wondering if the martial prowess of the women in the movie (Mao, Hsu, Li Li Hua) leads to gender confusion, which is a common and universal trope in many action/adventure stories--"You can fight, bu- bu- but, you're a woman?!" Such revelations are often disarming for the villains as well as the heroine's allies. [embed]221831:43736:0[/embed] It wouldn't be old school kung fu without something from Shaw Brothers Studios. This year's Old School Kung Fu Fest has two very different kinds of Shaw Brothers films nearly a decade apart. First there's 1972's Intimate Confessions of a Chinese Courtesan, Chor Yuen's brothel-based wuxia picture that plays a bit like a semi-sexploitation/revenge movie, albeit a well shot one. There's sexual violence, a little lesbianism, and some S&M for good measure, with a kind of luridness that I wasn't expecting from an early 70s Shaw Brothers production. And on the other hand, there's Lau Kar Leung's My Young Auntie (1981), a broad Cantonese comedy starring Kara Hui as a demure martial arts master trying to keep a family's fortune away from the hands of greedy relatives. My Young Auntie is kooky and delightful (though maybe a fight-lite affair for some action movie fans), and might play a good double-feature with Lau's pseudo-screwball comedy martial arts picture Heroes of the East (1978). While the tone of both these Shaw Brothers films is different, Intimate Confessions of a Chinese Courtesan and My Young Auntie are, broadly speaking, about women seeking empowerment, justice, and dignity in their own ways. The newest film at the Old School Kung Fu Fest is 1985's Yes, Madam, a very merry 1980s Hong Kong action movie. The movie stars Michelle Yeoh and Cynthia Rothrock as a pair of female supercops busting criminals and making them take insane, breakneck falls. It's so "Hong Kong in the 80s" that it features appearances by Sammo Hung and recurring players from the Lucky Stars movies. Yes, Madam kicked off the "girls with guns" HK subgenre, which basically meant action movies led by femme fatales. Other films in the genre include Magnificent Warriors (1987), Naked Killer (1992), Black Cat (1991), and Angel Terminators (1991). [embed]221831:43738:0[/embed] Yeoh is one of the biggest Asian actresses in the western world, though her Yes, Madam co-star, Cynthia Rothrock, is probably one of the most unsung female action stars of her era. Rothrock was an accomplished martial artist prior to getting into action movies. While her American output tended to be of low quality and direct-to-video, she made many great films in Hong Kong during the 1980s as a star or supporting player. Yes, Madam is easily among her best, but also keep an eye out for 1986's Righting Wrongs (co-starring Yueen Biao), 1987's The Magic Crystal (co-starring Andy Lau), and 1988's Righting Wrongs 2: Blonde Fury. Seven movies and one weekend isn't enough to cover the breadth of wonder women in kung fu cinema. An entire program might have been built around King Hu's output or Angela Mao's films alone using a similar theme. Though the 1990s isn't old school enough yet, I was hoping to see something familiar from my teenage years in the fest. For instance, I remember loving movies with Brigitte Lin (particularly The Bride with White Hair), in which the "You're a good fighter but you're not a man?" gender confusion was to be expected. There's also Johnnie To's Heroic Trio films, which starred Yeoh, Maggie Cheung, and Anita Mui as three ladies saving the day in a dystopian future. (Maybe in the seventeenth edition of the Old School Kung Fu Fest.) I suppose I bring those other movies up since Wonder Woman, Atomic Blonde, Mad Max: Fury Road, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens signal a genuine hunger for female-led action movies. People want stories in which the women aren't just damsels in distress or trophies for the heroes. Even Doctor Who finally acknowledged the need for more gender representation in male-dominated genres, naming Jodie Whittaker as the thirteenth Doctor. This need goes back decades, and maybe in this particular year these kinds of stories seem more necessary than before. Girls to the front, and don't be afraid to kick anyone who gets in your way. Cheng Pei Pei did it 50 years ago, and so can you.
Old School Kung Fu Fest photo
Those females are strong as hell
The seventh Old School Kung Fu Fest kicks off today in New York City at The Metrograph. The event runs all weekend, and celebrates the kick ass women of classic martial arts cinema. The official theme is "Wonder Women of the ...

Review: The Hitman's Bodyguard

Aug 18 // Matthew Razak
[embed]221830:43734:0[/embed] The Hitman's BodyguardDirector: Patrick HughesRated: RRelease Date: August 17, 2017 The Hintman's Bodyguard ain't nothin new. It's one of those buddy cop assassin movies in the vein of 48 Hrs. where a straight laced guy, Michael Bryce (Ryan Reynolds), needs to escort a loudmouth criminal, Darius Kincaid (Jackson), in order to take down an ever worse criminal. In this case that criminal is Gary Oldman playing a dictator with a funny accent, which only adds to the cliche of the whole plot. You know how this goes. Things don't go to plan, wise-cracking occurs, friendships are made, cars blow up, Salma Hyak curses a lot in Spanish. If you really must know the story, Kincaid is a professional assassin who must get to the Hague to testify against Oldman's villain, and after INTERPOL is infiltrated Bryce, a down on his luck professional security agent, is the only man for the job. With films like these its much less about the story and much more about how the two leads play off each other, and if the screenplay gives theme enough to work with. Will they get to their goal on time? It's almost a certainty. Are we going to enjoy the trip is the real question. Thankfully the casting choices for this movie are perfect because it basically just needs Reynolds to be Reynolds and Jackson to be Jackson. The two play off each other fantastically and are charming as hell. Any scene with them bantering is at the very least fun to watch and at the best times hilarious. They both play well in their overly cliche roles and at times seem to be reveling in the stupid simplicity of every action movie trope they walk into.  Those tropes are actually handled acceptably by director Patrick Hughes, who won't be winning any awards for his action direction, but also can keep a car chase coherent. That probably shouldn't be high praise, but after this summer where even the Fast and the Furious failed to hold its car chases together, I'm all set to give him an Oscar. The movie doesn't have the creativity of Baby Driver, but it at least keeps its pace going and never feels overblown. Part of that might just be the fact that its a lower budget action flick that falls squarely into the B-grade range of film, but credit where credit is due. The fight sequences don't suck either, though again, they're just above par. We're not talking The Raid or anything. The film does have some tonal problems that stem from the fact that everyone involved is a killer of multiple people in one way or another. While the banter and near-parody love story try to keep things light, there is a running background of a mass-murdering, psychopathic dictator with no qualms about shooting children in the face. It's no fault of the film's, since I'm guessing they didn't plan to have Nazis all over the news the week before release, but set against the backdrop of current events it often seems flippant with the idea of genocide. It will shift dramatically in tone within a single scene, especially near the end when one-liners interrupt photos of mass graves.  I know I may seem like I'm flopping back and forth on this movie, but that's just because it is such a terribly cliche action flick, and yet it works as it needs to. Maybe I was just let down so much this summer that a return to the tried-and-true action movie formulas of summers gone by just hit the spot. Whatever the reason, I found The Hitman's Bodyguard to be enjoyable despite the highest compliment I am able to pay it is that it is competent.  Darius Kinca [embed]455494:69246:0[/embed] The Hitman's BodyguardDirector: Patrick HughesRated: RRelease Date: August 17, 2017 The Hintman's Bodyguard ain't nothin new. It's one of those buddy cop assassin movies in the vein of 48 Hrs. where a straight laced guy, Michael Bryce (Ryan Reynolds), needs to escort a loudmouth criminal, Darius Kincaid (Jackson), in order to take down an ever worse criminal. In this case that criminal is Gary Oldman playing a dictator with a funny accent, which only adds to the cliche of the whole plot. You know how this goes. Things don't go to plan, wise-cracking occurs, friendships are made, cars blow up, Salma Hyak curses a lot in Spanish. If you really must know the story, Kincaid is a professional assassin who must get to the Hague to testify against Oldman's villain, and after INTERPOL is infiltrated Bryce, a down on his luck professional security agent, is the only man for the job. With films like these its much less about the story and much more about how the two leads play off each other, and if the screenplay gives theme enough to work with. Will they get to their goal on time? It's almost a certainty. Are we going to enjoy the trip is the real question. Thankfully the casting choices for this movie are perfect because it basically just needs Reynolds to be Reynolds and Jackson to be Jackson. The two play off each other fantastically and are charming as hell. Any scene with them bantering is at the very least fun to watch and at the best times hilarious. They both play well in their overly cliche roles and at times seem to be reveling in the stupid simplicity of every action movie trope they walk into.  Those tropes are actually handled acceptably by director Patrick Hughes, who won't be winning any awards for his action direction, but also can keep a car chase coherent. That probably shouldn't be high praise, but after this summer where even the Fast and the Furious failed to hold its car chases together, I'm all set to give him an Oscar. The movie doesn't have the creativity of Baby Driver, but it at least keeps its pace going and never feels overblown. Part of that might just be the fact that its a lower budget action flick that falls squarely into the B-grade range of film, but credit where credit is due. The fight sequences don't suck either, though again, they're just above par. We're not talking The Raid or anything. The film does have some tonal problems that stem from the fact that everyone involved is a killer of multiple people in one way or another. While the banter and near-parody love story try to keep things light, there is a running background of a mass-murdering, psychopathic dictator with no qualms about shooting children in the face. It's no fault of the film's, since I'm guessing they didn't plan to have Nazis all over the news the week before release, but set against the backdrop of current events it often seems flippant with the idea of genocide. It will shift dramatically in tone within a single scene, especially near the end when one-liners interrupt photos of mass graves.  I know I may seem like I'm flopping back and forth on this movie, but that's just because it is such a terribly cliche action flick, and yet it works as it needs to. Maybe I was just let down so much this summer that a return to the tried-and-true action movie formulas of summers gone by just hit the spot. Whatever the reason, I found The Hitman's Bodyguard to be enjoyable despite the highest compliment I am able to pay it is that it is competent.  Darius Kinca
Hitman's Bodyguard photo
I won't always love you
It's August, and that means we're entering the second span of doldrums for movie releases for the year (the first being the beginning of the year). From now until late September, when all of the horror films start rolling in,...

Fast and cheap Inhumans photo
Fast and cheap Inhumans

Interview with Inhumans director doesn't inspire confidence in fast, cheap IMAX TV series pilot


Scott Buck strikes again
Aug 17
// Hubert Vigilla
Judging from the first trailer and the San Diego Comic Con trailer, The Inhumans might be a bona fide disaster. Excuse me, a bona fide disaster shot in IMAX. A bigger screen won't fix bland, and this looks like the second Mar...
Obi-Wan spin-off movie photo
Obi-Wan spin-off movie

That's no moon, it's an Obi-Wan Kenobi stand-alone Star Wars movie in the works


This is the IP you're looking for
Aug 17
// Hubert Vigilla
Even though the stand-alone Han Solo movie has gone through some major problems, Disney isn't giving up on Star Wars spin-offs. Heat Vision confirmed today that an Obi-Wan Kenobi movie is in the works. Academy Award-nominated...
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Gremlins 3 sequel may be happening with Chris Columbus attached


Don't read after midnight
Aug 17
// Rick Lash
Talks of a third Gremlins film have been on the winds for going on two decades now. Original director Joe Dante apparently indicated at one point the sequel was dead because the technology made to create Gremlins and Gre...
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AMC threatens legal action against MoviePass


My lawyers will beat up your lawyers!
Aug 16
// Drew Stuart
Yesterday, MoviePass, a company that allows its subscribers to see unlimited movies for a monthly fee, slashed the price of that fee. The internet ran with it, and now MoviePass is trending all over the web, especially on red...
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New Thor: Ragnarok Trailer teases Doctor Strange


I'm really glad this movie isn't boring
Aug 16
// Drew Stuart
If you saw our coverage of SDCC two months back, you may have seen this incredible trailer for the upcoming Thor: Ragnarok and thought to yourself, "Jeeeez that looks like a hell of a lot of fun!" I wouldn't blame you, it's w...
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Netflix will spend $7 Billion on Original Programming in 2018


That's...quite the downpayment.
Aug 16
// Drew Stuart
Netflix has had its share of ups and downs lately. They've outperformed all of their competitors, have exceeded their own growth expectations, and have seen their stock soar more than 10% in a day. However, with Disney p...
Killing of a Sacred Deer photo
Killing of a Sacred Deer

Trailer: The Killing of a Sacred Deer showcases unnerved Nicole Kidman & Colin Farrell


Yorgos Lanthimos gonna Yorgos Lanthimos
Aug 16
// Hubert Vigilla
I'm guaranteed to watch anything from Greek filmmaker Yorgos Lanthimos. Dogtooth haunted and disturbed me, and two-thirds of The Lobster is some of the best commentary on modern love I've seen. Lanthimos is back with his late...
Adam Sandler photo
Adam Sandler

Adam Sandler's next Netflix movie, The Meyerowitz Stories, has a trailer


Could Sandler actually act this time?
Aug 16
// Matthew Razak
Here's a dirty little secret Adam Sandler seems intent on keeping under wraps: the man can act. Back in the day he seemed to be on the verge of pulling his comedy career into something more with films like Punch Drunk Love, b...
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Officially Official: Daniel Craig returning for Bond 25


Super confirmed
Aug 16
// Matthew Razak
There was a bit of a kerfuffle yesterday when Daniel Craig mentioned on a radio interview that nothing was finalized with him being in Bond 25. Turns out that was a lie as the actor had obviously agreed to super duper double ...
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Nosferatu remake will reteam The Witch star and director


I'd like to unlive deliciously
Aug 16
// Anthony Marzano
On Tuesday it was confirmed that Anya Taylor-Joy, star of The Witch (which I will henceforth refer to by it's much cooler stylized title) and M. Night Shyamalan's Split was in talks to reunite with director Robert Eggers for ...
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Moviepass just slashed its price from $50 to just $9.95


...and the internet is eating it up
Aug 15
// Drew Stuart
It's no secret that movie theaters have been struggling lately. With so many movies available online; on Netflix, Hulu and Amazon, the average person sees little need to go out of their own way to see a movie in theaters. I m...
Old School Kung Fu Fest photo
Old School Kung Fu Fest

NYC: Watch wonder women kick ass at the Old School Kung Fu Fest (August 18-20)


Subway Cinema returns to The Metrograph
Aug 15
// Hubert Vigilla
Subway Cinema's seventh edition of The Old School Kung Fu Fest is back this weeked at The Metrograph, running from Friday, August 18th through Sunday, August 20th. Last year's Old School Kung Fu Fest celebrated Golden Harvest...
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You can now watch the full first episode of the new Ducktales on YouTube


Can anyone spare a lucky dime? Anybody?
Aug 15
// Rick Lash
Maybe you knew, maybe not, but there’s a Ducktales reboot. The original series ran from 1987 to 1990 and was most definitely a kid’s show (I would know, I was one). The new iteration tries something a li...
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Game of Thrones Season 7 Recap: 'Eastwatch'


Please don't turn me into a marshmallow,
Aug 14
// Rick Lash
YOU WERE RIGHT AND I WAS WRONG: BRONN is spelled with a double n. It's been a while since I've seen all these names in print! That said, my main point of contention with earlier season 7 episodes continues to problematic...
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Willem Dafoe says you can't eat your ice cream inside in The Florida Project trailer


I will return on the third day for rent
Aug 14
// Anthony Marzano
It's a dark world out there, no matter how you look at it. There's bills a plenty, and not that much money to go around. The saying "you gotta do, what you gotta do" is more prevalent now than ever before. We've seen a lot of...
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Do you want more Conjuring/Annabelle movies?


And why would anyone buy that doll?
Aug 14
// Matthew Razak
I liked The Conjuring well enough, and I do find creepy dolls really creepy, but of all the horror franchises in existence to have a horror "universe" born out of it I would not for a moment have guessed it would be...
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Your Bad Movie Night Guide, Vol. 4: Tango & Cash


The original shower buddy cop movie
Aug 11
// Rick Lash
Imagine a time when movie heroes were heroes not for being pretty, metrosexual types capable of playing a broad range of characters aptly displaying a broad spectrum of emotions, but because they had big muscles, or knew kung...
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mother! trailer with Jennifer Lawrence makes you wee in your pants a little bit


Just a drop or two, but still!
Aug 11
// Rick Lash
I've always thought Jennifer Lawrence (Passengers, The Hunger Games) and Javier Bardem (Skyfall, No Country for Old Men) would make a great couple. Like, they have so much in common, and obviously there'd just be so...

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