Guillermo del Toro

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Crimson Peak trailer reveals ghosts and blood


Have we seen the whole movie now?
May 13
// Matthew Razak
The first trailer for Crimson Peak from director Guillermo Del Toro was significantly creepy, hinting at the terror that the house held and just how odd Tom Hiddleston and Jessica Chastain were going to be. Like good hor...
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Ryan Gosling in talks to star in Guillermo Del Toro's Haunted Mansion


Hey girl, are you a ghost? Because you hunt my dreams
Apr 10
// Per Morten Mjolkeraaen
Good news, everyone! It looks like Guillermo Del Toro's Haunted Mansion, based on the Disney ride of the same name, is finally back on track with Ryan Gosling in talks to star.  Del Toro first revealed Haunted Mansi...
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Pacific Rim continues with new comic, Tales from the Rift


Guillermo del Toro is a true renaissance nerd
Mar 26
// John-Charles Holmes
In case you couldn't get enough Kaijus and Jaegers the first time you saw Pacific Rim, Guillermo del Toro has you covered with the upcoming sequel, which has actually just entered pre-production. However, if 2017 is still a l...

FlixList: Six abandoned movies that Kickstarter could have saved

Feb 20 // Flixist Staff
Stanley Kubrick's Napoleon Stanley Kubrick's meticulousness was (is?) legendary. He was one of few truly genius directors, and he threw himself into his projects. If you see it in a Kubrick film, it almost definitely means something. (Though what things may mean is undoubtedly up for debate.) But the project that consumed him most was one that never saw the light of day. Though he had numerous failed projects, the one that stung the most was a failed biopic of Napoleon Bonaparte. Kubrick essentially became a Napoleon scholar in the process of setting this film up, learning everything he could about the man in order to make what would probably have been the best epic biopic ever made. It may have been his magnum opus... but alas. Not everyone was an enamored of the idea as Kubrick, and he was unable to convince financiers to give him what he needed to pull off his (ludicrously) grand vision. (Looking for a cast of tens of thousands in order to pull off an accurate and realistic portrayal of battles will do that.) And of course, the same things that kept it from happening back then would keep Kickstarter from being able to fund it. No, the film would never be able to make enough to actually front the costs of a production like this, but few to no Kickstarter film projects are funded solely by backers. But the world has changed since Kubrick died, and it's possible that a Kickstarter campaign could have built a groundswell of support to convince some big spender(s) to pick up some of the slack. -- Alec Kubas-Meyer Alejandro Jodorowsky's The Sons of El Topo/Abel Cain and King Shot Alejandro Jodorowsky has undergone a semi-resurgence in the last few years now that his seminal works--El Topo, The Holy Mountain, and Santa Sangre--are easy to get in the United States. But Jodorowsky had a 20-year drought as a filmmaker beginning in 1990, unable to get any projects off the ground. Two notable Jodorowsky films that never got made are a sequel to El Topo and a gangster film called King Shot. The El Topo sequel (variously titled The Sons of El Topo and Abel Cain) would have starred Marylin Manson and Johnny Depp as brothers in search of the island on which their father, El Topo, is buried. King Shot, a metaphysical gangster picture, was going to be produced by David Lynch and star Nick Nolte, Manson, Asia Argento, and Udo Kier. It's unclear if actual scripts existed for either of the two projects, though there is some concept art and vague notions of a plot that can be found online. Jodorowsky's no stranger to projects that got away (see the documentary Jodorowsky's Dune, which, come to think of it, I would pay money to see produced). Yet given his klout as the father of midnight movies, it seems like these two Jodorowsky projects would have come about if crowdfunding were a thing in the 1990's and early-to-mid 2000's. Instead, it's crowdfunding that gives us The Dance of Reality and the forthcoming Endless Poetry. -- Hubert Vigilla David Lynch's Ronnie Rocket It's easy to think David Lynch has done it all. From his brilliant surrealist directorial debut, Eraserhead, to his return to Twin Peaks in 2016 - 25 years post its original run. However, there is one movie he's always wanted to make, but never could; Ronnie Rocket.  Ronnie Rocket was to star Michael J. Anderson as a three-foot tall man who could control electricity, as long as he was plugged into an electrical supply from time to time to charge his batteries. Oh, also, there was to be a detective who sought to enter a second dimension, which was made possible by his ability to stand on one leg (no wonder it didn't get the funds it needed, I mean, I can't even imagine the special effects costs to make this happen...)  It's sound incredibly bizarre, and therefore, incredibly Lynchian. Sadly, he will most likely never make this today, as the industrialism that's synonymous with everything he creates is ruined. Untouched and sacred industrialism has been killed by the damned youths and their spray-cans, or just simple architectural modernisation. -- Per Morten Mjolkeraaen  Shane Carruth's A Topiary Shane Carruth's second film, Upstream Color, was a daring and idiosyncratic work of art and a fitting follow-up to his mind-bending debut Primer. Upstream Color is easily one of my favorite movies of this decade. The movie obsessed me so much, I wrote an 8,000-word analysis. But before Carruth made his misfit love story about mind-control worms and personal narratives, he spent years developing a movie that fell apart. That movie was A Topiary, the plot of which sounds just as slippery as Upstream Color and Primer, if not more so. Split in two parts, A Topiary would follow an informal gathering of strangers who are convinced there's a recurring and meaningful starburst pattern that can be found wherever they go, and a group of pre-teen boys who find a machine that creates strange robotic animal creatures (featured briefly in the beginning of Upstream Color). Somehow the two are linked. Both David Fincher and Steven Soderbergh were excited by the project and wanted to executive produce the film. Carruth spent years learning to do CG so he could create the creatures and do the visual effects for A Topiary on his own. Unfortunately the proposed price tag was $14-$20 million, and with only Primer under his belt at the time (budget $7,000), the project fizzled. Carruth wouldn't be able to get seven or eight figures through crowdfunding, but if the campaign showed genuine enthusiasm from an audience, it might have prodded some money-people to fork over the dough. (Maybe Carruth should consider crowdfunding for his next movie, The Modern Ocean.) -- Hubert Vigilla Guillermo del Toro's At the Mountains of Madness Guillermo del Toro and screenwriter Matthew Robbins wrote a screenplay adaptation of HP Lovecraft's At the Mountains of Madness back in 2006, and have been fighting to get it made ever since. A combination of the high budget required (the story was long considered unfilmable) and studio discomfort with the bleakness of the material have thus far prevented it from happening. Del Toro has occasionally come close to getting it made, most recently with Universal Studios in 2011. However the studio, uncomfortable with del Toro's refusal to pare down the R rated material to a more family-friendly PG-13, opted instead to pull of the project before filming began. Lovecraft's work has been adapted to film a number of times, most notably (and often) by Stuart Gordon. Those films are fun, but I would argue they convey little of the cosmic existential horror that makes Lovecraft's work what it is. On the other hand del Toro's films, even the more mainstream English language ones, contain traces of that darkness, though usually to a more positive end. We've never seen him go for the hopelessnes he would need for At the Mountains of Madness, but for his fans, and old-school horror fans in general, the prospect is mouth-watering. Del Toro hasn't given up on getting it made through the studio system, and raising the kind of budget necessary through something like Kickstarter would be a tall order. That said, if every true-blue Lovecraft fan still waiting to see his work done justice on the big screen were to give just a dollar, I reckon it could happen. -- Ciaran McGarry Neil Blomkamp's Alien OK, this one may be newer and Kickstarter is around, but there's no way it's ever going to happen. Blomkamp revealed some amazing concept art for a made up Alien film he was randomly thinking about, but with Prometheus hogging up the franchise they'll never, ever, ever green light this. Fox has no idea what it's doing and there is no way in hell they'd jump on such a cool idea from such a stand out director in the world of science fiction. This is basically impossible to occur and even if a Kickstarter was started for it Fox would have to give permission and they wouldn't in a million years. I don't say things are impossible much, but this is impossible. I will eat a shoe if it ever happens. The level of this not happening is so great that God is coming down and confusing our language in punishment. This will not... Wait? It is? Oh... better find a shoe. -- Matthew Razak
Kickstarter, Our Savior photo
Well... maybe.
We all know that Kickstarter is pretty cool. (Heck, one of our writers used it to fund his last short film.) And film projects tend to be pretty safe bets; while video game Kickstarters routinely fail in a spectacular fashion...


Crimson Peak Trailer photo
Thems some strong words yur usin' thar
A return to horror for Guillermo Del Toro is probably some of the most exciting stuff going on this year and with this first trailer for Crimson Peak we can see he's back in form with stunningly creepy visuals. If the d...

Nick's Top 10 Movie Music Moments of 2014

Jan 14 // Nick Valdez
Honorable Mentions: Birdman - Flight scene, Snowpiercer - "What happens if the engine stops?," The Skeleton Twins - "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now," 22 Jump Street - "Ass-n-Titties," Into the Woods - "Agony" [embed]218773:42129:0[/embed] 10. The Hunger Games Mockingjay - Part 1 - "The Hanging Tree" as performed by Jennifer Lawrence Every year there seems to be a song that's meant to break into mainstream pop. Usually by happenstance, or some kind of weird popularity spike, and "The Hanging Tree" is 2014's single. Written by the Lumineers (with influence from the original text), and given an odd dance backing so it can be played on the radio, this moment may have been forced but it did show off the first actual rebellion against the Capitol. Like other parts of Mockingjay - Part 1, the scene finally opens up the world beyond Katniss and her compatriots.  [embed]218773:42130:0[/embed] 9. The Lego Movie - "Everything is Awesome/(Untitled) Self Portrait"  "Everything is awesome, everything is cool when your part of a team" was 2014's "Let It Go." There's a dollar theater in my town next to the local grocery, and when I first heard a little girl singing that song, I knew we had a winner. The scene it's used in doesn't hit perfect status until the "12 Hours Later" bit but it's still very good. Even better? Batman's demo tape, "DARKNESS! NO PARENTS!" [embed]218773:42132:0[/embed] 8. Guardians of the Galaxy - "Come And Get Your Love"  As critics like myself (although I'd like to think I'm as far from that definition as possible) continue to worry over the staleness of Marvel's films, the intro to Guardians of the Galaxy, featuring a nonchalantly groovin Chris Pratt dancing to a once forgotten Redbone tune, helps alleviate some of that worry. Starting off on the right foot, this scene helped set the tone for Marvel's future. It's going to be a lot more fun.  [embed]218773:42134:0[/embed] 7. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles - "Elevator Beatbox"  You won't see the TMNT movie on many Best of 2014 lists, but I've got to credit where it's due. It may have be clouded by a bunch of odd decisions, but the Turtles themselves were great. Although they looked like giant steroid hulks, the few times they got to act like their "Teenage" namesake truly stood out. This came to a head in the elevator ride before the final battle with Shredder. It's the most fun scene in this film, and it's completely unnecessary when you think about it. But it's full of so much personality it's hard to care. I want the sequel to basically be this scene x 100.  [embed]218773:42133:0[/embed] 6. The Guest - "Anthonio" The Guest has one of the best soundtracks of 2014. Fusing synth pop and trance together with little known European Pop remixes, and coupling them with a nostalgic run through the horror genre lead to one of the best musically inclined films of the year. The Guest owes most of its successes to its soundtrack and it's never better than the final scene. A stare down, a remix of Annie's "Anthonio," and a sinister Dan Stevens are a match made in heaven.  [embed]218773:42135:0[/embed] 5. The Book of Life - "Just A Friend/The Apology Song/I Will Wait" as performed by Diego Luna, Cheech Marin, and Gabriel Iglesias I think The Book of Life'll be the only time I hear Tejano-inspired music in film and that's a bit sad. Like me, it takes influences from classic pop tunes and unapologetically puts a little Mexican flair into each one. There's too many awesome songs to name (but the one touted as the "big" one, where Diego Luna performs a cover of "Creep," is kind of lame) with the too brief "Just a Friend," and the great "Apology Song" sung to a flaming skeletal bull in the Land of the Forgotten, but my favorite is definitely the montage set to "I Will Wait." It's hilarious, critiques Mexican culture, and it just sounds so pleasant.  [embed]218773:42137:0[/embed] 4. The Interview - "Firework" as performed by Jenny Lane Although the clip above doesn't refer to the scene on this list (as it's much better to experience it without being spoiled), trust me when I say that it's truly a great movie music moment. The scene that launched a thousand emails, and was most likely toned down in retrospect, but it's a damn fun scene. Much like the rest of The Interview, it makes sense in the most absurd way. Hope you get to see it for yourself.  [embed]218773:42138:0[/embed] 3. X-Men: Days of Future Past - "Time in a Bottle" With as many comic book films I see now, they all start to blend in together after awhile. What woke me up from my haze, however, was Days of Future Past. While the rest of the film followed the same beats, and Quicksilver himself wasn't the most interesting addition, I've never seen a better demonstration of super speed. Sure we've seen this type of slowdown in films like The Matrix, but I can't recall seeing it used so humorously. It's the little touches that made everything work.  [embed]218773:42136:0[/embed] 2. Frank - "Secure the Galactic Perimeter/I Love You All" as performed by Michael Fassbender Frank is a film about twelve people saw, and that's a damn shame. It's got some of the best music from 2014. The songs were notably assembled by the cast (and not even available in full on the soundtrack) and they're just so weird. Good weird. While the final song "I Love You All" gets the full bump on this list, it doesn't really mesh as well as it should until you've seen the film. Once you've seen the film, learned of all of Frank's quibbles, then it truly comes together.  [embed]218773:42139:0[/embed] 1. Whiplash - "Caravan" as performed by Miles Teller God, Whiplash has the best f**king music. That finale? So gooooooooooooooood. What are your favorite music moments of 2014? Agree or disagree? Leave a comment below or hit me up on Twitter! Stay tuned through the rest of the week for more "Best Of" lists! 
Nick's Top 10 Music photo
Music to my eyes
Music plays an integral role in film. Easily ignored, easily forgotten, a film's soundtrack is the little celebrated framework of cinema. But when sound and sight marry into a great scene, you get some of the best moments. Li...

Crimson Peak photo
Crimson Peak

First images of Del Toro's Crimson Peak are just the best


Jan 05
// Nick Valdez
It might be a little too early to call it, but I'm going for it. Judging by these few images of Guillermo Del Toro's upcoming Crimson Peak, it's going to be the greatest thing ever. A gothic horror film starring Jessica Chast...
The Book of Life Trailer photo
The Book of Life Trailer

Trailer for The Book of Life continues to look bueno


Aug 08
// Nick Valdez
The Book of Life, produced by Guillermo Del Toro and directed by Jorge Gutierrez (who once created one of my favorite cartoons ever, El Tigre), looks absolutely stunning. I've completely fallen for this Die de Muertos film s...
Hell-no 3 photo
Hell-no 3

Hellboy 3 definitely isn't happening


Jul 15
// Nick Valdez
After years of endless trying and never giving up, Guillermo del Toro finally gave up on making Hellboy 3 a reality. On a recent Reddit AMA, del Toro admitted the film wasn't happening due to a lack of a studio backing: ...
Pacific Rim 2 photo
Miracles do happen
It seems that Guillermo Del Toro has made everyone's wishes come true and then some. When Pacific Rim failed to be a truly massive hit it was unclear if we'd ever see more, but now according to the above video we'll see...

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Del Toro writing Pacific Rim 2 right now


Still no money to actually make it
Jun 09
// Matthew Razak
At ATX this weekend Guiellermo Del Toro made fans of his Pacific Rim a little excited as he announced that he's working on the sequel's with The Incredible Hulk writer Zak Penn script as if he already had funding fo...
Book of Life Trailer photo
Book of Life Trailer

First official trailer for the Del Toro produced animated film, The Book of Life


May 30
// Nick Valdez
The Book of Life is definitely on my list of films to keep an eye out for. Produced by Guillermo Del Toro and directed by Jorge R. Gutierrez (who created one of my favorite past Nickelodeon cartoons, El Tigre, which Book of ...
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Del Toro's Crimson Peak to horrify in 2015


Oct 28
// Matthew Razak
Guillermo Del Toro is officially returning to horror as Crimson Peak, his upcoming haunted house film, has gotten an April 2015 release date. The movie has been collecting up a fantastic cast like Benedict Cumberbatch and Tom...
Treehouse of Horror photo
Treehouse of Horror

Watch Del Toro's Simpsons Treehouse of Horror couch gag


Can you spot all the references?
Oct 03
// Nick Valdez
The Simpsons has been around for a long, long time. I may be the only one who believes this, but I want the show to keep going for as long as it can. As the show enters its 25th season, one of the staples of the show has bec...
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Pacific Rim opens well in China, sequel more likely


Aug 01
// Hubert Vigilla
While Guillermo Del Toro's Pacific Rim has been a bit of a bust at the box office domestically, it's been doing quite well overseas. In fact, Pacific Rim had a record-setting opening day in China on Wednesday, grossing $...
Pacific Godzilla photo
Pacific Godzilla

Godzilla style fan trailer for Pacific Rim is wonderful


Pacific Rim wishes it could be Godzilla.
Jul 31
// Nick Valdez
Pacific Rim may not have been the best thing since sliced Godzilla bread, but it did inspire a lot of folks with how much it resembled other things. First we had that nice fan trailer cut with Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers m...
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Mondo releasing Guillermo Del Toro Criterion posters


Jul 31
// Hubert Vigilla
The Criterion Collection put out The Devil's Backbone on DVD and Blu-ray this week, one of Guillermo Del Toro's bona fide masterpieces. This is the second Del Toro movie in the Criterion Collection, the other being his f...
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Pacific Rim won't get a director's cut


Hour of extra footage destroyed by monster/robot battle
Jul 15
// Matthew Razak
Reports came in pretty quickly that Guillermo del Toro had cut about an extra hour of movie out of Pacific Rim to make sure the character's story arcs were pared down to their bare essentials. As someone who came away from th...

Review: Pacific Rim

Jul 12 // Matthew Razak
[embed]216062:40410:0[/embed] Pacific RimDirector: Guillermo del ToroRated: PG-13Release Date: July 12, 2013  The unfortunate thing about Pacific Rim is that aside from it being a move where giant robots beat up on giant monsters there really isn't anything that special about it. In fact, as far as story and characters go, it's scraping the bottom of the barrel. In the future a dimensional rift opens up in the bottom of the Pacific Ocean and monsters called kaiju start to pop out every so often. In order to defeat these monsters humanity builds giant robots called jaegers. The jaegers must be piloted by two poeple at the same time who connect through memory. The basic premise feels a lot like any monster movie or anime where giant robots punch monsters, and that's really the point -- so we're good to go so far. However, the characters in this film are as bland and two dimensional as they come. We meet Raleigh Becket (Charlie Hunnam) and his brother Yancy (Diego Klattenhoff), two Jaegar pilots who are at the top of their game until the bad guys on the other side of the rift start sending through monsters that are a bit tougher to kill. Yancy dies as part of the longest pre-title sequence ever and Raleigh quits the jaeger program. Five years later the jaegers are all but destroyed and humanity is retreating behind walls. However, Stacker Pentecost (Idris Elba), the leader of the jeager program, doesn't think it should be shut down so he starts running it outside of the world's governments with only four jaegers left and brings Raleigh back. Raleigh eventually partners up with Mako Mori (Rinko Kikuchi) as the last jaegers attempt to destroy the rift. Lots of awesome jaeger/kaiju fighting ensue. This film is stunningly gorgeous to look at when giant robots are punching cleverly designed monsters in the face. The fight sequences are massive and impressive all around -- even in this day and age of massive and impressive fight sequences. Seeing them on the big screen is well worth your while and if you go in with expectations of only seeing big, impressive monster/robot fights that were clearly inspired by all the classic Japanese monster/robot fights then you won't be let down. So there's the recommendation. It's a perfectly cool monster/robot movie. Unfortunately the second the folks step out of those giant robots things get really dull and incredibly flat.  The characters in this film feel like they were ripped from the worst cliches of every anime/action movie ever. The dialog sometimes felt like it was taken directly from a bad dubbing of Gundam. There's the headstrong jock who thinks he's the best, the stern commander, the no-rules hot shot, the meek-but-secretly-strong woman. There's even two goofball scientists in the form of Charlie Day and Burn Gorman who are so clearly attempting to be comedic relief anime characters that they successfully become 100 percent annoying. Sadly, much of the film's plot rests with them. A lot of these tropes may actually be del Toro attempting to pay homage to the films he's referencing, but the problem is that that doesn't make the characters any more interesting. He teeters back and forth between trying to be serious about the subject and trying to poke fun at it, and fails at both.  The big problem here is that the lack of interesting plot or characters effects the action sequences. It's really hard to care about two minor jaeger pilots who may die because we've only seen them on screen for ten seconds and they're some of the worst stereotypes ever. When Elbra stands up to make his triumphant speech before the last battle you don't get that "fuck yea, HUMANITY!" feeling that Bill Pullman engenders in Independence Day, but instead you simply know another monster/robot fight is about to ensue. Yes, it will be cool, but there's almost no emotion attached to it.  This issue also stems from the fact that there are no real bad guys for the movie to latch onto. Much like we can't get attached to the giant robots because we don't care about the people in them, there's no enemy to really start hating. The monsters are sent through from the other side of the portal, and we're told the aliens are evil, but we never have any chance to really hate them because we don't get to see it. Most of the destruction is on such a massive scale that it's hard to humanize with it, and when it does come down to a smaller scale it is often obscured in bad dialog or attempts at humor.  I am being incredibly harsh, however. I had expectations that this movie was going to be something different and it wasn't so it's way easier to point out its flaws. In comparison to Transformers 3 this film has just as much emotional connection and interest -- the action is definitely better. The problem is that this should have been better than that. It should have been something special, and all we got was more of the norm. Normally you shouldn't gripe about an action movie being big and dumb, but after the destruction of Superman I was hoping that Pacific Rim would give us something more.
Pacific Rim Review photo
Big, brash and bland
When talking about Pacific Rim you really have to start with expectations. Expectations for this particular film were all over the place. Those who just saw the trailers simply thought it was yet another giant robot movi...

Pacific Rim poster photo
Pacific Rim poster

Metal Gear artist drew Pacific Rim's Japanese poster


Drawn by Yoji Shinkawa, this poster is the embodiment of my dreams.
Jul 12
// Nick Valdez
Remember how Hideo Kojima (creator of the Metal Gear Solid and Zone of the Enders franchises) tweeted how much he enjoyed Pacific Rim (Oh yeah, Kanye did too but Im'ma let you finish)? The connections between Guillermo Del To...
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Mondo unveils some marvelous posters for SDCC 2013


Jul 11
// Liz Rugg
As we mentioned yesterday, Mondo has some awesome stuff lined up for this year's San Diego Comic Con. In addition to their awesome lineup of six posters by various artists for Guillermo del Toro's upcoming Pacific Rim that we...
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So it goes (maybe); Del Toro also wants Benedict Cumberbatch for Frankenstein
With Pacific Rim making its way into theaters this week, Guillermo del Toro now has his sights set on the future. First there's the ghost story Crimson Peak, but there are other projects on the horizon. One of the biggies: he...

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Four clips from Guillermo del Toro's Pacific Rim


Rocket propelled punches be breaking monster jaws
Jul 01
// Hubert Vigilla
Four new clips from Guillermo del Toro's Pacific Rim (aka Mighty Morphin Power Jaegers) have popped up, and the biggie is the one above. In it, you watch some hardcore kaiju-on-Jaeger action. It includes a special Jaeger mov...
Hellboy 3 photo
Hellboy 3

Hellboy 3 still isn't happening


Hell to the no.
Jul 01
// Nick Valdez
While Guillermo Del Toro has been inspired to at least get started on a third Hellboy film for awhile now, financial backing for the film has still always been up in the air, keeping the entire project in limbo. There ha...
Pacific Rim Trailer photo
Pacific Rim Trailer

Trailer: Pacific Rim


They connect to the Jaegers via "neural handshake"? Adorable.
Jun 25
// Nick Valdez
The newest trailer for Pacific Rim may very well be the best one yet. It's got Idris Elba's "canceling the apocalypse" speech from the first trailer slowed down to its actual film delivery speed, it features a good amount of...
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Pacific Rim featurette shows off lots of robots, action


May 31
// Liz Rugg
As if you needed any more of a reason to be excited to see Guillermo del Toro's upcoming Summer action movie Pacific Rim, in this new behind the scenes featurette, the director talks about some of the crazy set design that w...
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Trailer: Pacific Rim


Full of more giant robots and monsters
May 16
// Matthew Razak
OK Pacific Rim, we get it. You're going to be awesome. This new trailer shows off even more robots punching monsters than we've seen before and it's hard to be anything but excited for this much robot on monster action....
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Big Pacific Rim banner poster shows off kaiju and jaegers


Note them little people for scale, folks
May 03
// Hubert Vigilla
So that new trailer for Guillermo del Toro's Pacific Rim was full of awesome and boat sword. The same goes for this super-big banner poster for the film, which is the same distance as the entire length of the Golden Gate Brid...
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Benedict Cumberbatch joining del Toro's Crimson Peak


Apr 05
// Logan Otremba
There really has not been any specific details’ regarding Guillermo del Toro’s next project from Legendary Pictures, Crimson Peak. The newest detail coming from Variety is that Benedict Cumberbatch is joining the ...
AMERICA photo
AMERICA

UPDATE 2: New Pacific Rim Jaeger posters are gorgeous


USA! USA! USA! Oh and Australia I guess...
Mar 29
// Nick Valdez
UPDATE 2: Now we've got all five Pacific Rim Jaegers folks! USA's Gipsy Danger and Australia's Striker Eureka! Now that you've seen them all, what do you think? I'm personally hoping they eventually combine and form a Voltron...
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New pics for Pacifc Rim, details on Crimson Peak


Big robots and haunted houses
Feb 19
// Thor Latham
We have a couple new pics for Guillermo Del Toro's Pacific Rim here. Nothing particularly glamorous, a pic and a piece of concept art, but you take your giant fighting robots where you can get 'em. What may be of more interes...
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New concept art from Guillermo del Toro's Pacific Rim


Feb 18
// Hubert Vigilla
We're a few months away from the release of Pacific Rim, Guillermo del Toro's love letter to kaiju movies and giant robots. The movie landed the cover of Total Film, and in the magazine are some new bits of concept art. One f...
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Del Toro to produce Secret Garden adaptation


Feb 05
// Matthew Razak
Deadline is reporting that Guillermo Del Toro is set up to produce a version of The Secret Garden by Beasts of the Southern Wild writer Lucy Alibar. Universal snapped up the pitch amiss a battle of four studios...
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New images from Pacific Rim are full of sci-fi goodness!


Robots packing punches
Feb 04
// Thor Latham
With all of those other cool Super Bowl commercials airing yesterday, you were probably thinking to yourself 'I'm sure they'll show something for Pacific Rim. Why else am I watching this silly game of sports ball?' ...
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Flixclusive: Why Henson shelved Del Toro's Pinocchio


An inside source reveals the reasoning behind the Jim Henson Company's decision
Feb 01
// Hubert Vigilla
We just reported that Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio has been put on the back burner by the Jim Henson Company. The film's co-writer, Gris Grimly, tweeted that the box office numbers on Frankenweenie were partially to blame f...
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Guillermo Del Toro's Pinocchio put on the back burner


Now he'll never become a real boy
Feb 01
// Thor Latham
I suppose the laws of probability would dictate that out of the million or so projects Guillermo Del Toro has on his plate at any given time, at least a couple aren't going to come to fruition. That doesn't excuse how depress...

Review: Mama

Jan 18 // Sean Walsh
[embed]213444:39045[/embed] MamaDirector: Andres MuschiettiRated: PG-13Release Date: January 18, 2013 Mama is about Lucas (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau), his kind of bitchy hard-rock girlfriend Annabel (Jessica Chastain), and his two nieces, Victoria (Megan Charpentier) and Lilly (Isabelle Nelisse). Five years ago, Victoria and Lilly were lost in the woods courtesy of Lucas's brother, who had a pretty serious meltdown, shooting two co-workers and his wife, then kidnapping the girls and driving super-recklessly down an icy road. He naturally crashes his car and dragged the girls through the woods looking for \shelter. They eventually find it in a run-down cabin and, five years later, the girls were found, dirty, feral, and sans father. Reunited with Lucas, they move into an observation house so he and Annabel can take care of them while Dr. Dreyfuss (Daniel Kash) observes them. All this sounds like a Lifetime movie more-so than something del Toro would attach his name to, right? Well, the girls have an invisible friend named Mama, except she's really not so invisible, and she gets really, really jealous... First thing's first: Mama herself is made out of 100% nightmare fuel. In a once-in-a-blue-moon instance, I found the so-so CGI to actually make her scarier. Everything about her is unnatural, and unlike the main antagonists of Insidious and Sinister, she is not goofy once you get too good of a look at her. Her inhuman wails, the way she moved, everything about her made me uncomfortable and I loved every second of it. As far as the cast goes, Charpentier and Nelisse (especially Nelisse) were really impressive. For two little girls to outshine Jessica Chastain, that's quite a feat. Victoria was three when they went into that cabin, so she still has some social skills, but Lilly was just a baby and as a result only has very basic communication skills. Naturally, one is closer to their terrifying caretaker than the other. Watching Lilly bound around on all fours and eat moths like they were fruit was not only creepy, but believable. She spent five of her first six years on this earth eating cherries in a cabin with no heat, electricity, or indoor plumbing, raised by a horrible ghost-monster and Nelisse really nailed it. Chastain started out as a very unpleasant character, and I was not thrilled when Coster-Waldau was taken out of the picture for most of the movie. However, that allowed for Annabel, left with the responsibility of taken care of two super damaged children that she was only responsible by proxy for, to grow as a chartacter. Daniel Kash's Dr. Dreyfuss was fairly standard as doctor characters go, but he played the character well. The only other character of note in the film (aside from Mama, of course) was the girls' aunt Jean (Jane Moffat) and she played the situational antagonist (she's just worried about the kids, man!) very well, but she may as well have had 'sacrificial lamb' tattooed to her forehead. I've always been a sucker for horror films that center around families, and Mama was nice as it featured such a broken jumble of a family, something that is pretty relatable in 2013. The film had great tension, even if much of it lead to jump scares as the payoff, but the character of Mama was creepy enough that it really didn't matter. There was a really interesting first-person dream sequence that, while a little cheesy, presented Mama's backstory in a very interesting way. As far as movie monsters go, she is one of the best to come around in a long time. Without giving anything away, I was genuinely surprised with the end of this film. It's not the shiny and happy end that we so often get, and not even all that optimistic. When I can't guess an ending, that really goes an incredibly long way with me. Granted, it wasn't all that surprising when you look back at the film after the credits start to roll, but in a time when complacency has set in, subverting expectations is key. Claiming that any film, regardless of genre, is the best of its kind three weeks into the new year is certainly silly, but Mama is certainly the best horror film of 2013 so far. I know it won't hold that title come December 31st, but it will be hard to beat. If you're looking for a genuinely creepy film, you will find it with Mama. I would've just been satisfied with “better than Don't Be Afraid of the Dark,” which Mama totally is. Also, Jessica Chastain is hella sexy with that short, black hair. For what it's worth.
Mama review photo
Warning: Nightmare fuel ahead, next 100 minutes
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