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9:00 AM on 09.03.2014

Nick Cave performing in NYC for special screening on 20,000 Days on Earth

Are you a Nick Cave fan? Do you live in or around New York City? Then you need to mark September 20th on your calendar, because whatever you might have been doing that day is less important than what you will be doing now. To...

Alec Kubas-Meyer


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Terra Battle In-Game Giveaway

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3:00 PM on 08.20.2014

Check it out: new poster art company FAMP Art to release City of God posters

Perhaps riding on Mondo's coattails, a new poster company based out of New York will be debuting next month. FAMP Art claims it wants to "bridge the gap between pop culture art and art-house cinema, focusing on films that don...

Liz Rugg



Japan Cuts 2014 continues where NYAFF leaves off photo
Japan Cuts 2014 continues where NYAFF leaves off
by Alec Kubas-Meyer

With our NYAFF coverage still running strong, it seems an appropriate time to let you know that there's much, much more where that came from. Starting this Thursday, July 10th, the Japan Society kicks off their NYAFF crossover. Through Sunday, each film will be a co-presentation, and then Japan Cuts takes on a life of its own and runs through the 20th.

Japan Cuts is the largest Japanese-centric film festival in North America, and there's always at least a couple of fantastic films that I gush about for the rest of ever. I already know that I won't be shutting up about Sion Sono's Why Don't You Play in Hell, which may well be his best film (other than the literally perfect Bad Film), and though I haven't seen it, I'm pretty sure that Neko Samurai is going to rock my world.

Below you can find the schedule, information about the films, and basically anything else you could possibly want to know about the festival. And if you're attending any of the screenings, let me know. I'll be around the Japan Society quite a bit. You should say hello.

[For the next month, we will be covering the 2014 New York Asian Film Festival and the Japan-centric Japan Cuts. Click here for more information, and check back here and here for all of the Asian film coverage you can shake a stick at.]

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NYAFF Recommendation: Han Gong-Ju photo
NYAFF Recommendation: Han Gong-Ju
by Alec Kubas-Meyer

Han Gong-Ju is incredible. It's easily the best film I've seen at the New York Asian Film Festival thus far and among the best I've seen in a long time.

It's also extremely depressing, to the point where I'm not sure I can really write about it. But I can't in good conscience not give it my sincerest recommendation. If you're in New York, it's playing at MoMA for the next week. Tickets can be bought here.

Whether we end up with a full review or not, go see Han Gong-Ju.

[For the next month, we will be covering the 2014 New York Asian Film Festival and the Japan-centric Japan Cuts. Click here for more information, and check back here and here for all of the Asian film coverage you can shake a stick at.]

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The 2014 New York Asian Film Festival is about to rock you  photo
The 2014 New York Asian Film Festival is about to rock you
by Alec Kubas-Meyer

It's that time again. Summer is here, which means that New York City residents have retreated to their air conditioned apartments, offices, and movie theaters. For the next few weeks, that theater of choice should be the Film Society of Lincoln Center's Walter Reade theater, where Subway Cinema will be celebrating all things Asian with the 13th annual New York Asian Film Festival.

For the past several years, I've had Hubert around to help me get through the massive list of films, but this year it's all me, and our coverage will be less comprehensive as a result. 

Even so, I will be seeing as many films as I can and letting you know what is and is not worth seeing. Our coverage begins this Thursday, June 26th, the day before the fest kicks off. And if you're going to be at any of the screenings, let me know. I'll be around the Walter Reade quite a bit, and it'd be awesome if you came to say hello. 

If that sounds like the best thing ever (and it should, because it is), you can find a ridiculously massive press release below or head over to Subway Cinema for more information on the films, guests, and everything else. Tickets can be purchased from the Film Society of Lincoln Center website.

[For the next month, we will be covering the 2014 New York Asian Film Festival and the Japan-centric Japan Cuts. Click her for more information, and check back here and here for all of the Asian film coverage you can shake a stick at.]

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Review: Soft in the Head photo
Review: Soft in the Head
by Alec Kubas-Meyer

Every once in a while, I see a movie that feels truly unique, and when that happens I tend to obsess over the process instead of the result. For better or worse, some films are just different, and while I definitely appreciate that difference, sometimes I really just have to wonder why.

Soft in the Head is different, and I spent much of the film wondering. I never found an answer.

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1:00 PM on 04.17.2014

New Ghostbusters 30th anniversary art revealed

As we previously reported, the Los Angeles based pop culture art gallery Gallery 1988 will be putting on a Ghostbusters 30th anniversary traveling art show over the next few months with four stops: LA, NY, Chicago and the San...

Liz Rugg



The 2014 Tribeca Film Festival is here photo
The 2014 Tribeca Film Festival is here
by Alec Kubas-Meyer

The 2011 Tribeca Film Festival was one of the first festivals Flixist ever covered. That was back before my time, but I was part of our coverage of the 2012 and 2013 fests, and I'm excited to be a part of it again. This year, Isabelle Magliari and I will be spending the next week and a half down at the Chelsea Cinemas seeing what there is to see and bringing you reviews of all the good (and hopefully none of the bad) stuff that they've got on the slate.

The festival officially started last night, but it begins in earnest today, and anyone interested should head over to the official festival website and see what's playing. Then check here over the course of the festival and find out what's actually worth spending money on. 

And if any of y'all are going to be down there, let us know. We should hang out. Or at least high five or something.

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5:00 PM on 04.04.2014

Gallery 1988 to bring traveling Ghostbusters art show to NY, LA, Chicago and SDCC

As fans still reel at the loss of actor and writer Harold Ramis, here's something for Ghostbusters fans to look forward to -- in celebration of the movie's 30th anniversary, LA based pop culture art gallery Gallery 1988 is or...

Liz Rugg



Review: Child's Pose photo
Review: Child's Pose
by Alec Kubas-Meyer

At first glance, Child's Pose is making a political statement about the class divide present in modern day Romania. The narrative of a wealthy family trying to skirt its responsibilities to a poor family is heavily charged, and for much of the film's first half, I expected to open this review with some statement about how wealth and connections in the modern age can literally let people get away with murder. 

But then things changed. The class thing became less important, and the story became a whole lot more personal, because Child's Pose isn't really a film about how much power the wealthy hold over the poor. It's about the depths of motherly love.

Or rather, motherly obsession.

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1:00 PM on 01.07.2014

Next Korean Movie Night NY is wild, wild, wild... and sad

New year, new Korean Movie Night series in New York City. This first series, entitled "Wild Days," is about coming of age, with four films that deal with teenagers doing wild things as teenagers are wont to do (especially in ...

Alec Kubas-Meyer





9:00 AM on 12.02.2013

Here is the 2013 South Asian International Film Festival

Film festivals, man. There are so many of them. Especially in the wonderful world of New York City. Case in point: the 2013 South Asian International Film Festival, which begins tomorrow, December 3rd, and runs through Sunday...

Alec Kubas-Meyer



Review: It's Me It's Me photo
Review: It's Me It's Me
by Hubert Vigilla

Doppelgangers are the stuff of horror and of comedy. It would be uncanny to see yourself as a stranger -- the self's own reflection as the Other -- and yet being able to step outside yourself might provide you with some perspective about your own buffoonery. I suppose there's another issue in all this. There's the unstated question: would I be my own friend or my own worst enemy?

In It's Me It's Me, there's a bit of comedy and a bit of terror involved in this tale of multiple doubles. (I guess technically that'd just be "multiples.") When the film embraces its strangeness it's like the Japanese cousin of Being John Malkovich, Michel Gondry's odder movies, or a Franz Kafka story. (I guess technically that'd just mean work kind of like Japanese writer Kobo Abe.) Strangeness really is the film's strength, and that winds up being its throughline.

[This review was originally posted as part of our coverage of the 2013 Japan Cuts Film Festival. It has been reposted to coincide with the film's New York theatrical release.]

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NYCFF Review: So Young photo
NYCFF Review: So Young
by Alec Kubas-Meyer

I'm still young. Young enough that I can understand and generally relate to the characters in So Young, but also old enough to see just how silly they actually are. It's an odd place to be, and it leaves me wishing I was a few years older. Being young, or so young, anyway, is overrated. The desire to recapture that magical age where nothing really matters seems to miss just how awful it is when nothing really matters. I'm past that, mostly, and I'm thankful for it. I look at some of my younger friends, still at that point, and they want more responsibility, to age and for things to mean something. The more realistic of them know that life doesn't end in college.

So Young would disagree, choosing to believe that nothing really matters after college (or even high school, in some cases). What happens then are the defining moments and driving forces for the characters' lives, ones that stick with them for years beyond. And that's not cute or romantic.

It's just sad.

[This review is being posted as part of our coverage of the New York Chinese Film Festival. All of our coverage can be found here.]

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Watch out for the 2013 New York Chinese Film Festival photo
Watch out for the 2013 New York Chinese Film Festival
by Alec Kubas-Meyer

[Just a reminder that this is going on! I was hoping to have my review of So Young up by now to act as a reminder, but I have been at the AMC Empire all day and it's made writing kind of hard. Am still there, actually, and will continue to be for two more films. So come join me! And if you go to one of the Donnie Yen films tomorrow, you may see a ghost of Flixist past, Hubert Vigilla (RIP)!]

See? I told you there were more festivals for New Yorkers to get excited for. The latest is the 4th annual New York Chinese Film Festival, which will be taking place from Tuesday, November 5th through the 7th at various locations around New York City. The festival will be showing seven films over the three days (with the bulk of the showings taking place on Wednesday). It's a pretty good lineup, with a mixture of new films, new-ish films, and Donnie Yen classics.

And like all good film festivals, special guests from each of the films will be attending the festival, including Zhao Wei, Miriam Yeung, and Donnie Yen.

More information about the festival and the films can be found below, and tickets can be purchased here or here.

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New York Film Festival 2013: Flixist Awards and Recap photo
New York Film Festival 2013: Flixist Awards and Recap
by Alec Kubas-Meyer

Can you believe that it's all over? I can't. For much of the past month, the New York Film Festival has consumed my life. And now it's over. But we're finishing it off with a bang. The video above is Hubert and my final thoughts/discussion on the subject, and it was shot in a Koreatown restaraunt called Arirang. The audio quality is subpar but audible. Just a bit of background noise. 

And below is our recap and awards. The awards were interesting this year, since there were so many great performances we gave extra awards in every acting category. And even with all that, we had to leave out some awesome stuff. It really was a strong lineup this year. I should mention that for the most part we wrote reviews of the movies that we really loved, so the fact that the reviews are so heavily positive is simply because we skipped the lesser ones (although we reacted to every single one in 30 seconds or less). So catch up on what you missed, and let us know how you feel about the whole thing.

When will there be more festival coverage up on Flixist, you probably aren't wondering? Pretty soon, I'd guess, though I can't say when exactly. There are always more festivals to be covered, even if I'll be flying solo for a while.

Sob.

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NYFF In 30 Seconds or Less Roundup #2 photo
NYFF In 30 Seconds or Less Roundup #2
by Alec Kubas-Meyer

So, it took a while to get to this, but we have finally compiled the rest of our NYFF In 30 Seconds or Less videos. If you missed part 1, make sure to check it out here, and come back tomorrow for our final roundup of the festival, which includes the coveted Flixist awards.

Due to some YouTube things, unfortunately our ability to use custom thumbnails disappeared during the uploading of this series, which is why things go from looking nice to being just images of our faces. Sorry about that. 

My recommendations: our Stray Dogs videos and Hubert's reaction to Blue is the Warmest Color. Those are definitely the highlights. The others are good too, but they're not funny.

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Korean Movie Night NY remembers director Park Cheol Soo photo
Korean Movie Night NY remembers director Park Cheol Soo
by Alec Kubas-Meyer

[Just a reminder that this continues tomorrow, October 15th, with the 2005 film Green Chair. If you live in New York, make sure you're there! This is a great (and super rare) opportunity to see a great movie on the big screen.]

Korean Movie Night returns, and it's kind of a depressing one this time. Earlier this year, director Park Cheol Soo was struck by a drunk driver and killed, and the Korean Culture Service has put together its latest screening series to remember him, showing  two of his older films (301, 302 and Green Chair) before the North American premiere of the film film he lived to see release (B.E.D.). There is also a special, unrelated screening, of the action-comedy Secretly Greatly, playing next Tuesday, September 10. The Park Cheol Soo series then runs every other Tuesday through October.

As always, the films screen on at 7 PM at the Tribeca Cinemas. Tickets are first-come, first-serve, and they are free. More information can be found below.

 

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NYC: Upper West Side Alamo Drafthouse ain't happening photo
NYC: Upper West Side Alamo Drafthouse ain't happening
by Hubert Vigilla

Good news for New Yorkers who like bad news: plans for a proposed Alamo Drafthouse in the Upper West Side have been scrapped. Kaput. Finito. Not pining for the fjords. Has ceased to be. The sad news was posted on the Drathouse website. The key part of the statement:

Construction costs have risen tremendously since engaging in the project back in early 2012 (due in some measure to ongoing Hurricane Sandy reconstruction efforts) and ultimately the location is no longer financially viable for us. We would love to make the upper west side location our next neighborhood theater in New York, but we cannot see this particular location as sustainable under current conditions.

The Yonkers Drafthouse location is currently open at least, and plans appear to be unchanged for the downtown Brooklyn Drafthouse location in 2015. I haven't had a chance to get out to the Yonkers one yet since it's inconvenient to get to from where I am. It's going to happen eventually, though.

Looks like it's back to the Nitehawk for now... or, you know, brown bagging it at the Pavillion.

[Drafthouse blog via NY Times ArtsBeat]

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10:00 AM on 09.16.2013

NYC: See Vampire's Kiss w/ Nicolas Cage free on 9/20

There are many reasons to love Nicolas Cage, as our own Nathan Hardisty has noted. One of the most compelling cases for loving the man is the 1988 Robert Bierman film Vampire's Kiss. The movie features one of Cage's Cage-iest...

Hubert Vigilla



The New York Film Festival announces its 2013 main slate photo
The New York Film Festival announces its 2013 main slate
by Hubert Vigilla

Even though Alec and I talked about being a bit exhausted from film festival coverage, I'm really looking forward to the upcoming New York Film Festival. Yesterday they announced the main slate, which includes a lot of movies I've been looking forward to for months. Some highlights:

I have no idea how this will compare to last year's New York Film Festival, but I'm actually more excited for this year's slate so far than I was with last year's.

After the cut is the official press release with the full main slate list with plot info.

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Flixclusive Interview: Cutie and the Boxer photo
Flixclusive Interview: Cutie and the Boxer
by Hubert Vigilla

I might have missed Ushio and Noriko Shinohara's apartment if it wasn't for the doorbell and the little handwritten sign above it. Now it seems so obvious. Around their home there's a bridal shop, some nice places for lunch, and chic spots that speak of the city's continually changing face. Their building, however, has the vibe of an older New York, which is crucial to so much of the documentary Cutie and the Boxer. The film is about the unique relationship between Ushio and Noriko. The couple have been artists in the city for decades and continue to create and care for one another.

"They're the last of a dying breed in some ways," said the documentary's director Zach Heinzerling. "They live in this cave in DUMBO where nothing like this exists around it. Every other building has been renovated, and this one hasn't."

"We can make this like a history museum," Noriko laughed.

Their apartment is like a history museum already, or maybe a time capsule. They moved to DUMBO from SoHo in 1986, and the rooms feel long lived in. The book spines and VHS labels have all comfortably yellowed. This is how the New York artist lived when artists could still afford to live in New York.

I sat down with Zach, Ushio, and Noriko in the studio space that adjoins the living room. We were surrounded by a chaos of colorful artwork in various stages of completion.

[Thanks to Ryuhei Shindo, one of the film's producers, for translating Ushio Shinohara's responses.]

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