Questions

Hologram Flixistentialism photo
Hologram Flixistentialism

Ask Flixistentialism questions...one last time...


It's that time folks...
Jan 07
// Nick Valdez
If you're a fan of Flixistentialism, you've probably seen this coming for a while now. We tried our best to make it work, and we had a real fun go at it (I know I did!), but our time's sadly come up. But we're not leaving you...
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Ask Flixistentialism some questions before Black Friday


Nov 19
// Nick Valdez
Whoa, another Flixistentialism is happening already? We're really spoiling you guys here. I think we want to record tonight because next week the gang'll be too busy stuffing ourselves with bird carcasses like the zoo defilin...
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Flixistentialism is back, back again, so ask questions!


What? Really? Yes.
Sep 25
// Nick Valdez
Sorry for the Flixistentialism hiatus, you guys. We tried to make stuff happen, but our schedules failed to mix up. Last week it almost worked too, but my car was nearly stolen so that kind of threw a rock into our plans! &nb...
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Flixistentialism is back so give us them questions


After a brief hiatus.
Aug 13
// Nick Valdez
Is a two week break considered long enough to be a hiatus? Whatever it was, the three of us took a brief relaxation period because none of us could get our schedules situated. But now Flixistenialism is back and recording ton...

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Flixistentialism is still rated R, so ask us questions


Cause we're better than a tame Robocop
Jul 23
// Nick Valdez
So the new Robocop is rated PG-13 (which means it's not cool enough for an  R anymore), but luckily for you, Flixistentialism is still rated R. What would a PG-13 Flixistentialism even be? Like two seconds of Liz? Whatev...
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Flixistentialism is the new black, so ask us questions


Jul 17
// Nick Valdez
I've jumped into Jenji Kohan's Netflix series, Orange is the New Black, about two days ago and I haven't stopped watching it since. I'm on episode seven right now and I'm probably going to talk about it much to the chagr...
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Flixistentialism needs those questions, mang


"UGH YEAH UGH YEAH" - All of Jay Z's lyrics
Jul 09
// Nick Valdez
I just listened to Jay Z's Magna Carta Holy Grail album last night so it's all I've been thinking about. I'll probably talk about it some since there were some strong feelings. But besides that, got any questions for us? Do as you normally do. Drop you question in the comments below or tweet at us: @dredose (Dre), @LizRugg (Liz), or @Valdezology (ME).
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We need Flixistentialism questions on repeat y'all


Spraaaaaaang breeeeeeeeeeeak y'alllllllll
Jul 02
// Nick Valdez
I just recently saw Spring Breakers so I'm itching to talk about it. If you have any questions about the movie, I definitely want them. Either way, Flixistentialism is back from its brief break and look at our sh*t. We got sh...
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Ask Flixistentialism questions or I'll eat this shoe


I'm serious. I'll do it.
Jun 19
// Nick Valdez
Flixistentialism is back and recording tonight after its week hiatus (blame Liz and her magic milkshakes), so you should ask us questions! If not, I'll be forced to eat this shoe. I don't want to eat the shoe, but I will sinc...
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Questions

Ask Flixistentialism some questions because we love you


Dropping the L Bomb for the listeners,
Jun 04
// Nick Valdez
Felt left out of our Flixist Movie Club last week (tanks on tanks on tanks) because you haven't seen Fast & Furious 6 yet? Don't worry, we've got you covered. We're recording our standard (well, our definition of it) show...
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Fast and Furi-YES

Ask us Fast Six questions or we'll lose our goatee


We're doing Flixist Movie Club: Fast Six Cast this week!
May 28
// Nick Valdez
One of the funniest things floating around the Internet (which I totally missed and didn't acknowledge in the review) is the fact that Dwayne Johnson's goatee somehow disappears and reappears multiple times throughout Fast &a...
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Flixistentialism needs your questions for answering


Mar 06
// Geoff Henao
Good morning, my friends and compatriots. Andres is dealing with a gout epidemic, so I tagged in with the assist for this week's call for Flixistentialism questions. For those that may not remember or haven't been around, And...
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Ask us questions so we could answer them


Feb 27
// Nick Valdez
Dre's out this morning, so I'm writing the questions post for our recording tonight. As you can tell, I'm nowhere near as witty or creative with these things as he is. What would Dre say here? Uh..."I'm Dre and I like women a...
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Don't leave us alone on Valentine's Day, ask questions


Please keep us company ... Nick is prone to crying
Feb 13
// Andres Bolivar
Considering the cast consists of young, sexy, single casanovas who look down upon the idea of a pre-ordained holiday celebrating those who have fallen into the shackles of relationships ... Me, Liz, Nick and Geoffrey decided ...
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Ask us questions or there won't be a Fast & Furious 6


Feb 06
// Andres Bolivar
You're probably thinking to yourself "Does Dre really have the power to cancel Fast and Furious 6? I mean, billions of dollars were spent on the production and promotion on this film". The real question you should be asking yourself is "DO I REALLY WANT TO TAKE THAT RISK IN CASE HE CAN!?" Do yourself a favor, ask us questions.
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Recording Djangocast tonight! Ask us questions


The movie had our curiosity, your questions have our attention
Jan 09
// Andres Bolivar
That's right, we're recording Da-Jangocast (the D is not silent in our case) as our first Flixist Movie Club of 2013. For the uninitiated, Flixist Movie Club is a special time when we take our unfocused disheveled podcast and...
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Ask us questions, Tiny Dancer


Also, if you can, count the headlights on the highway
Jan 03
// Andres Bolivar
On New Years night, towards the close of the night, me and a couple friends were at a bar all whiskey-ed out and exhausted. But then, Elton John's "Tiny Dancer" came on and we found enough energy to belt the f*ck out of that ...
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All Santa Chainz wants for Christmas is questions


Also, big booty hoes
Dec 19
// Andres Bolivar
I'm starting a new Christmas tradition ... and that tradition is a combination of Santa Claus (who died for our sins) and 2 Chainz (big booty hoe aficionado). Ladies and gentlemen, be sure to tell your children of Santa Chainz. ASK QUESTIONS OR RISK BEING ON THE NAUGTY LIST (which in Santa Chainz lore, isn't as fun as you might think it is).

Q&A with The Unjust Director Ryoo Seung-wan

Jul 16 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
Q: How much of how the film works and how the police work is a direct reflection of reality and how much is exaggeration. Is it an accurate representation of things that are going on in Korean society or is it more embellished? Korea is a lot better than this movie. There are certain things that are happening in Korea nowadays as is depicted in this movie. There are some facts and there are some exaggerations, but I want to say that I love my country! Q: What drove you to make this film? A: At the time, I was playing with the relationship of a person who struggles for survival, trying to take over other people's lives. As for the Korean political state, a few years ago we elected the wrong president, and drove those things out into the open.  Q: This is the first time you made a film based on somebody else's script. Was that problematic, or were you pretty much in agreement? A: It wa specifically tough because I was translating another person's words into mine. The thing about getting other people's scripts is that you don't have to name the characters. The hardest part of writing is naming the characters. Q: You have been compared with this film to Sidney Lumet, do you agree? A: Most of the films I make are homages to great directors, but this one I have specifically tried to get out of the those films. So instead of using or getting influenced by other films' characters, I tried to use characters that I met. It's an honor to have Sidney Lumet's name used near my film. It's an honor. Q: The violence is really aggressively brutal, how beaten up did the actors get? A: This movie is actually the easiest movie for my actors in terms of violence. While I've been shooting other films, I realized there are easier ways of filming action. Actually, filming action sequences in this film is unbelievably easier than the films I have done before. But that's industry secret recipe, so I can't really disclose it. Q: What's it like working with your brother [who played the prosecutor in the film]? A: You might think that because he is my younger brother, it would work but I think it gets in the way when making a film. Working with the family is really tough. The reason I continue to work with him is that when I look at him, he is the best actor available at this time in his age group. IN ENGLISH: Just my taste Q: What are your next projects? A: Well, I don't think far in the future, so I only know about the one directly following this one. It will still be an action movie in tradition with the genre movies, but I will be putting a lot more reality into it. I want to promise everyone that the next movie with feature more exploding actions than The Unjust. Q: Why do you shoot action films over some other type of films? A: It's a lot more difficult for me to shoot a conversation with a man and a woman than filming a fighting scene with thirty thugs. It's easier to shoot a scene where somebody is getting stabbed 45 times, but shooting a scene where someone says, "I love you" is really difficult. Shooting a kiss scene gives me a horror of an actual horror film. It just makes me shy. Q: Do you find a difference between an American and a Korean audience? A: It's hard to compare because the audience here tonight is somehow different than the general audience. It's better. The audience reaction tonight thrills me, so it's hard for me to compare that to the general audience reaction that this movie will probably get. If the Korean audience acted like the audience here tonight, then I'd probably be a millionaire by now... but I took an economy airline here. Q: In a conversation [outside of this Q&A], you mentioned that when you showed this film in Italy, the film was really serious, because I guess they found a lot of similarities in what was found on screen to the reality of the politics, so they didn't seem to enjoy it as much.  A: The reason that I think the Italian audience was serious is because the national identity and characteristic is somehow similar to that of Korea. Well at least for the American audience, the fear and the horror of the Bush administration was realized on screen as The Dark Knight. For the audience of Italy, there has been no such movie.  IN ENGLISH: Why so serious? Q: What's your favorite Korean movie? A: Park Chan-wook's. Oldboy, JSA, etc. IN ENGLISH: I love them, but I hate them. They make movies very real, and I hate them. Q: Where did you get your source material? A: In Korea, there are many soccer teams. If you go to one of those early morning soccer practices, and you will see old and colorful, distinctive men. There cycle goes: in the morning, they practice. At lunch, they drink, and later on in the afternoon they think about it, and then the next morning they go back to practice. If you hang around them, you get a lot of source. For this film specifically, I talked to a lot of police detectives and political and social reporter to do research. Q: If you were to make an American movie for an American audience, what would you make to be successful here? A: Even a few years ago, I was thinking I could make an American movie, and there were a couple projects that I was actually working on, but right now I've lost all appetite for making an American film. The reason being that I can only imitate, but there aren't much knowledge that I have about the American lifestyle. If I would have to make a movie that doesn't reflect my lifestyle, then it would be a fake. It feels more right when I make a film about where I live... and crucially, studying English is very difficult. Q: It seems to me that a very important character in the film is the city of Seoul. Everything is happening against the backdrop of the city. People live and die, betray each other, but the city stays the same.  A: Sometimes I think that not just Seoul but New York, Hong Kong, big metropolises turn people into monsters. Sometimes in these metropolises, the transition is too fast for somebody to follow. The City of Violence [which screened earlier in the day] is about a small city that, in the course of it, becoming a bigger city and the people are turning to damnation in the course of it. I think the idea that it turns people into things to be very interesting. 
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[For the next two weeks, Alec will be covering select films from the New York Asian Film Festival. For complete coverage of the festival, make sure to check out the page for the tag "NYAFF11." Keep watching throughout the wee...

Q&A with Yakuza Weapon star/co-director Tak Sakaguchi

Jul 14 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
Q: I was wondering if you could tell us a bit about the original work, the background of the film. It came from a comic book? A: The original comic is written by Ken Ishikawa.... There are three books of the manga out, and this covers the first book. Mr. Ishikawa actually died five years ago, and this is the first time one of his works has been adapted to film, and his surviving family has been very supportive of this adaptation. After the screening, the son came up to me and said that "this is really amazing," and "I really wish my father could have seen this," and he said it with tears in his eyes. Q: Lots of people saw Versus [Sakaguchi's first film - Ed.] just now. This cost a little bit more than what Versus cost, but it is still a low budget film. I was wondering if you could explain a little bit how you guys handled the action for this film. Was it in a different way than you did for Versus? A: When I did Versus I was still very young, and I didn't understand really the... action. It's been seven years since I created Team Zero, which is my action stunt team, and I've also since then worked as an action fighter and director for a number of films... For this film we really wanted the fight choreography to not be so pretty or beautiful but more yakuza-like. I created my own action team so I could really get into the kind of stuntwork I was interested in, but now I've lent my team of to my friends, like Sion Sono, the director of love exposure. I've lent the team out so much they haven't really come back to me. One big difference is that when I work with my team, they get really excited and say "Hit me! hit me really hard" and when I work with Shimamura Yuji's team [used for Yakuza Weapon - Ed.], they're really unhappy about that. Q: Can you tell us a little bit about the one-take, four and a half minute scene? A: The 4.5 minute action sequence was done in just two takes. On the first try, we did it when we were very early... and I was going to go knee somebody, and the person I was supposed to knee got scared and backed off and avoided the knee, and so I fell straight on there, and it actually it came up to my neck, and I actually broke a bone in my neck, but I kept shooting, and, on the second try, we got it successfully. Q: How long did you keep shooting with a broken neck? A: Until the end of that day. I didn't realize it was broken. I thought it really hurt a lot, and I went to the hospital and they said, "You know, it's broken." They said, if I "didn't have all those muscles in your neck, you would have been dead!" At this point, Sakaguchi was asked about an unrelated time when he fought a bear. He decided to reenact this with fellow actor Arata Yamanaka. I was able to film it(!), and that will be put up along with another video of the two of them in a few hours. Q: You said you started as a fighter? What kind of training have you done? A: Eight years of boxing, five years of kickboxing, four years of Mixed martial arts. I trained six years in using a katana sword, but very recently I've been training on the katana sword every day. The reason is that I have been punching and kicking people for a long time, and we're moving into a time where I'm going to start cutting people. When I get back, I'm gonna be working on a film with my friend Sion Sono where we will have endless katana fighting and killing, so I hope to see you guys again with that movie in tow!
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[For the next two weeks, Alec will be covering select films from the New York Asian Film Festival. For complete coverage of the festival, make sure to check out the page for the tag "NYAFF11." Keep watching throughout the ...

Q&A with B.T.S.: Better than Sex director Su Chao-pin

Jul 10 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
Q: Before we start taking questions I just want to ask you... This movie was shot in 2001. Can you tell me a little bit about what the Taiwan film industry was like in 2001? A: Can I first say my feeling about re-watching the movie? Actually I feel so embarrassed. Ten years ago I was young and and I was so brave... and Reign of Assassin's [another film screened at the festival, from 2010 and this was the film that I was most passionate about . and most creative about.  at this time the movie industry in Taiwan was really really badin 2001 I think the largest box office was US$30,000 really really bad this movie the budget is pretty low about US$300,000. Q: Were your investors worried about the content of the movie. Did it seem like a surefire bet or you thought it was pretty risky? A: I think we were very lucky, because we got subsidized by the Taiwanese government. I showed them the screenplay, and they said' "So your screenplay is very creative and so we will subsidize your movie," and then I finish it, and they give me a call, "We are very very concerned about your movie because of the contents," because this is a restricted movie, which at that time it was very rare for a Taiwanese movie but I think that's my choice but I thank the Taiwanese government for being so kind to me. Q: So looking at it again now, are you embarrassed by the contents or by the technical side of things? A: I think it's both, because this is the first time I'd been a director. I've been a writer, but I didn't know anything about how to direct. Q: So about the content: is there something in there that you would never put in a movie now? A: No! Although, I think if I'd do it in proper way, you know if I want to show the men doing the masturbation, I won't do a close-up of his face, because it's ugly! I think I'd put a different framing or different composition. Q: How'd this movie perform when it came out? A: I think it did quite. I think the box office in the whole Taiwan island was over 4 million, so it's not bad. Q: I feel like with Taiwanese directors there is an invisible pressure to move towards a slower movies... do you feel that pressure as a filmmaker in Taiwan to make anr own art-house film rather than a popular one?  A: I think I don't have this kind of pressure because I started my career as an engineer when I was 29, so I don't know anyone. I don't have any connections in this business, so I don't feel any pressure. I get to make the movie I want to make. Q: What was your favorite porn? A: Well we had someone collect all of the porn from that time, and I think my favorite is a bit of an antique, like from 40 or 50 years ago. The picture of the lady in this film was stolen from that, because it's so precious. Q: Why does everyone pee when they orgasm? A: I think it's because they can't hold it anymore. Q: How long did it take to make the movie, from start to finish? A: I think I finished the script quite quick, in about three months. Then we had 50 days for preproduction, 45 days for shooting, and another three months for postproduction. Q: Were MC hotdog and Michael Wong as big back then as they are now? A: I think they were bigger. It is very difficult to get people into the theaters for a local film, but we have a very strong music industry. Before this movie I had a good relationship with MTV and music television, so I know a lot of the people in that industry. I showed the project of them, and they were very interested and then volunteered almost. I did not have to pay them! Q: Where did you get the original idea? A: It's very difficult to say, but I think it's from my childhood and it's just the sex and desire that accumulated from my childhood it's like a release of the pressure of 20 years. Q: What do you mean in the movie when you say that "life is like eating tofu jelly.  You have to eat it while it's hot"? A: Because it tastes better while it's hot. Tofu jelly tastes better, so when it gets cold it does not taste as good as it does when hot. It's a gift in the moment. Q: There are two languages spoken to in the film, did you make a conscious decision at some point in the film to have two languages or was it written originally that everyone would speak Taiwanese or Japanese? A: It was originally written with two, because at that time that Japanese popular culture was very influential as a teenager. I wanted to emphasize that it's just kind of a phenomenon. Also the movie was a success when it was shown to Japan, because it was easier for the Japanese to relate to this kind of movie.  Q: The whole thing was the Japanese camera crew coming to try and save Taiwan... was that kind of did that come out of a larger idea of he relationship between Japan and Taiwan and the entertainment industry? A: At this time there were many many TV shows that were like this in Japan, and we Taiwanese people can watch it on a Japanese variety show on our TV 24 hours a day, so I think the idea is just from that. I didn't have any cultural influence. Q: Have you ever thought about going back and having another sex film? A: Yes. I want to make a sequel to [B.T.S.: Better than Sex] to see this boy Ling when he grows up, and what happens in his life. I want to make it Q: So, the movie doesn't seem like a Taiwanese movie.... Pretty much the whole movie seems like one of those Japanese movies from the 90s. I was wondering what kinds of Japanese movies you saw? A: Actually I don't see many of the modern Japanese movies. I see all of the Kurosawa movies and the ninja movies, but... I am becoming a fan [of manga]. I have a collection of over 6000 volumes of Japanese comic books. Maybe the influence is from the Japanese comic books Q: The Cabbie [Another film shown at the festival and the first film written by Su Chao-pin] is about you being a cab driver, but I thought you were a computer scientist? A: It was because of my father. My father owned a small cabbie company. So when I was in university, the tuition fee per semester was like US$200. I could make around US$1500 in a month by driving a cab, so during summer vacation and winter vacation when it was nice out I would drive to cab for my father. I was making money for like eight years, so that movie is from real experience. Q: Why are you drawn towards more like exploitation films, sex films and revenge films? What's wrong with you? [This was a tongue in cheek question.] A: I have no idea, but my mother wants to know too. I think the movie, especially the movie theater... I think you get into another world, and if you ask me you what kind of movie impresses me the most... I would say it's King Kong I saw when I was a kid, and Jaws that I watched when I was a kid. It's a spectacle, so maybe I always wanted to make some spectacle movies. I don't know.
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[For the next two weeks, Alec will be covering select films from the New York Asian Film Festival. For complete coverage of the festival, make sure to check out the page for the tag "NYAFF11." Keep watching throughout the wee...

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Flixist Podcast still kicking and wanting questions


Apr 08
// Adam Dork
Not letting anything get us down, we crusade against all odds for you. No letter is too great to stop this show. Even better, we will be having a brand new guest never heard before in audio fashion. Who is it, you a...
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Flixist Podcast wants your questions


Mar 25
// Adam Dork
It is that time again. We want your questions for Get Your Flix, the Flixist Podcast. Questions that we love happen to include films, movie soundtracks, concession stand treats, actors/directors, or film related topics. Use t...
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Flixist podcast deserves your questions


Mar 18
// Adam Dork
The Flixist Podcast, Get Your Flix wants to remind you that we would love to have your movie related questions, whether it is about scary movies or cute cuddly animation pictures. You ask it, we answer it. Unless we don't kno...
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Flixist Podcast wants your questions


Mar 11
// Adam Dork
Get Your Flix, the official podcast of Flixist, will be recording on Sunday night and we want your help! We want your questions related to movies; whether it is about the soundtracks, creators of the films, or some other whimsical and off-the-wall factoid. Comments are welcomed as well. You can leave your questions/comments here or on our Twitter.
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Another weekend show, questions please


Feb 20
// Adam Dork
This week's show will obviously be a weekend one in hopes of keeping the holiday tomorrow "holy." My co-host Siobhan Watters and guests Andres Bolivar and Maxwell Roahrig will be joining me later tonight to bring you a brand ...
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We will take your VD questions now


Feb 13
// Adam Dork
We will be recording Get Your Flix later tonight. I wouldn't necessarily call it a Valentine's Day special show, but we are doing it today so you can have it for tomorrow. Don't worry, I don't believe we will be getting that...
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Let's hear those questions


Feb 07
// Adam Dork
How about that football game? Did you expect -insert team name here- to pull it off? Oh who am I kidding, I didn't watch the game last night. But I did watch some of the trailers for the movies that were shown and that is a ...
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Finishing up your awards, your questions please


Jan 30
// Adam Dork
Tonight is the night to finish it up. We will be recording the final part of our Flixist awards in a few hours. As a reminder, we will be discussing the categories taking place on Thursday through Saturday. Set on dishing out the goods, Sean Walsh will be helping me break in Geoff Henao and Maxwell Roahrig. We'd still love to answer your questions if you got them!

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