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Science Fiction

Passengers photo
Also Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt
There are very few genres that Passengers, the new film from The Imitation Game director Morten Tyldym, doesn't seem to want to fit into. It starts out as a rom-com in space and then delves deep into science fiction...

Star Trek photo
Star Trek

Star Trek: Discovery delayed until May 2017


This is a good thing
Sep 15
// Matthew Razak
If you're anything like me then you've been waiting very impatiently for CBS to release Star Trek: Discovery so you can not watch it until its all out and that way only have to pay for one month of CBS's stupid streaming...
Star Wars SFX photo
Star Wars SFX

Watch ILM work their special effects magic on Star Wars: The Force Awakens


Tighten up the graphics on scene 3
Sep 07
// Hubert Vigilla
While producer Kathleen Kennedy has stressed the importance of practical effects and location shooting in this new batch of Star Wars films, CG still has a major role to play in bringing these movies to life. SFX innovators I...
The Bad Batch on Netflix photo
The Bad Batch on Netflix

Ana Lily Amirpour's The Bad Batch with Jason Momoa picked up by Netflix for SVOD


Aquaman drinks a Jizzy Fizz
Sep 07
// Hubert Vigilla
Writer/director Ana Lily Amirpour had a memorable debut with A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, a Jim Jarmusch-style Iranian vampire movie heavy with languid mood and style. (Not to be confused with a Jim Jarmusch vampire movi...

Star Wars photo
Star Wars

Luke Skywalker confirmed for Episode IX?


Because we're desperate for news
Sep 01
// Matthew Razak
Everyone stop everything! Mark Hamill may have just confirmed that Luke Skywalker is going to live through Star Wars Episode VIII and appear in Episode IX. Guess he won't be going the way of our old pal Han then. The act...
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HBO's Westworld gets a new trailer


Aug 31
// Rick Lash
Perhaps you've been feeling the fantasy blues on HBO of late. Game of Thrones been off the air for over two full months. True Blood for over two years. Maybe you've been hankering for some HBO-flavored western, and gosh darni...
Stranger Things S2 photo
Stranger Things S2

Netflix renews Stranger Things for a second season in 2017, watch the teaser


2 Stranger 2 Things
Aug 31
// Hubert Vigilla
I may be the last Gen-X-cusp-Millenial geek in America who hasn't seen Stranger Things yet. Now I have an excuse. Netflix's surprise hit of the summer has been renewed for a second season. The new season will debut in 2017. A...
Transformers photo
Transformers

So King Arthur will be in Transformers: The Last Knight


Just when you had hope
Aug 30
// Matthew Razak
Transformers: The Last Knight dropped an incredible looking poster a little while ago and it actually made me think that Michael Bay and company were possibly maybe doing something interesting. What a fool I am. With jus...
Guardians trailer photo
Guardians trailer

Check out the trailer for Guardians, a Russian Avengers-style superhero epic


In Russia, love comes to get you
Aug 26
// Hubert Vigilla
In the future, all movies will be superhero movies and all restaurants will be Taco Bell. Search your feelings, you know it to be true. While the United States has flooded the market with the Marvel Cinematic Universe and the...
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Firefly

Fan-made animated Firefly series gets a trailer... and not much more


Because our hearts need to break more
Aug 16
// Matthew Razak
Firefly just will not die, and there's very good reason for that. Despite only having one season on the air it has influenced sci-fi for years and created a devoted following. I count myself among that following so it is...
Star Trek photo
Star Trek

Tons of new details for Star Trek: Discovery revealed


Female lead, timeline and more
Aug 11
// Matthew Razak
Star Trek: Discovery head Brian Fuller was on a roll at the CBS All-Access panel at the TCA Press Tour dropping bombs about the show that Trek fans have been desperate to learn. The biggest one is that the show is s...
Phantasm sequel and 4k photo
Phantasm sequel and 4k

Phantasm: Ravager and the Phantasm 4k remaster get release dates--BOOOOOY!


Balls to the wall in Sept and Oct
Aug 10
// Hubert Vigilla
A while ago we reported that J.J. Abrams' Bad Robot was overseeing a 4k restoration of Don Coscarelli's 1979 cult classic Phantasm. I speculated that the remaster would be released to coincide with the fifth and final film in...
Star Trek photo
Star Trek

CBS Star Trek gets name and ship


Ugly, but wonderful
Jul 25
// Matthew Razak
CBS has been keeping their new Star Trek TV series under tight wraps, but at SDCC this past weekend during the Star Trek 50th anniversary panel they finally gave us some new news. First the name of the show will be Star ...
Kingsglaive: Final Fantas photo
Kingsglaive: Final Fantas

Watch the official trailer for Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV


I assume Sean Bean's character will die
Jul 24
// Hubert Vigilla
Earlier in the year we mentioned there'd be a CGI Final Fantasy XV movie as well as other spin-offs set in the world of the game. Now just two months before Final Fantasy XV's release, we have a full trailer for one of these ...

Review: Star Trek Beyond

Jul 22 // Matthew Razak
[embed]220689:42999:0[/embed] Star Trek BeyondDirector: Justin LinRated: PG-13Release Date: July 22, 2016  While many Trek fans will probably balk at this idea, Justin Lin was the exact right man to helm a Star Trek. We'll never be returning to the all out, slow-pan-around-a-star-ship, philosophical, socially aware, political format of Star Trek of yesterday because that's not what makes money, but we can have a strong mixture of action and heart. Lin brought that to the Fast and the Furious franchise in spades, turning a crappy series into something spectacular that people want to see. He did this not just through action, but by turning a cast of characters into a #family. That's what he's done with Star Trek Beyond too. The crew of the Enterprise is finally on their five year mission. In fact, they're three years into it and, as Captain Kirk's (Chris Pine) captain's log tells us, they're all getting a little bored with the daily grind of exploration. Kirk is questioning whether he wants to be a captain anymore and Spock (Zachary Quinto) is shocked to find that his elder self has passed. Luckily they're docking for resupplies at the newest and largest Star Fleet space station, but before they can settle in an alien shows up requesting help to rescue her crew from an uncharted part of a nearby nebula. The crew of the Enterprise jumps into action and promptly gets the ship torn to shreds, crash landing on an alien planet run by an evil alien named Krall (Idris Elba).  The separation of the crew after the crash landing and the relatively small scale of the story overall delivers a Star Trek that is far closer to the original series in tone than either of the previous two films. The removal of larger political pictures and the Enterprise itself means the focus lands squarely on the crew and that works wonders for finally delivering a Star Trek where you feel the crew is anywhere near the family that the crew of the original series was. Spock and McCoy's (Karl Urban) relationship is especially fleshed out while Sulu (John Cho), Scotty (Simon Pegg), Chekov (Anton Yelchin) and Uhura (Zoe Saldana) actually become characters instead of plot devices. It's clear that screenwriters Pegg and Dough Jung along with Lin have a far better understanding of what makes Star Trek special than Abrams and crew did. That doesn't mean that the movie turns its back on the new Trek formula. This is still an action movie first and a space drama second. Lin, of course, is really good at action. Again, though, the fights feel more personal and well executed than the previous films. The action is possibly even more over-the-top, and yet it feels more grounded. More importantly Lin keeps you on the edge of your seat throughout every sequence. By the time the now obligatory Beastie Boys song comes on its hard not to be cracking a massive smile no matter how much of a dour original Trek fanboy you are (and I am a big one).  It's even more refreshing that Beyond finally pulls the rebooted franchise out of the shadow of its predecessors. Into Darkness's misguided attempts to recreate Wrath of Khan made the crew seem trite and the story not hit when it was supposed to. Beyond is finally its own story, defining its own crew and creating its own feeling. While it still makes a nod here and there to the original films, it is finally telling its own story -- even if that story isn't all that groundbreaking. I must also champion the film for finally ditching the under armor uniforms that made it look like they were all on the way to bro out at the gym for a bit. The new costume design is spot on and feels much more like something the crew of a starship would wear. The redesign (yet again) of the Enterprise is pretty stellar as well.  For all the fun (and it is really fun) of the movie it isn't really pushing any new boundaries. The story may be new and the cast finally feels like it's gelling, but the plot is paper thin overall. You don't really have time to catch your breathe and think about it while you're watching, but Beyond doesn't go very far beyond in terms of pushing ideas or themes. Maybe, in this case, it doesn't have to. It's focus on the characters overrides its need for a strong plot line and it clearly cares more about hashing out the crew as people than making a profound social statement.  That focus on the crew means that this is by far almost every actors best turn in the role. Pine seems especially comfortable as a more laid back, experienced Captain Kirk while Urban's McCoy becomes less homage to the original and more something of his own. Yelchin finally gets a chance to turn Chekov into something else than a funny accent and nails it, and it's a shame we won't get to see him take the character any further.  Star Trek beyond feels like a very big budget episode of the television show, and while that was a insult for Star Trek: Insurrection, here it is a compliment. The original series and all its progeny had a sort of magic to them, and it stemmed from a crew that felt like a family. That, it turns out, was missing from this new Star Trek thanks to Into Darkness's attempts to replicate instead of create. Thankfully, Beyond brings it back and turns the franchise into something you definitely want to see live long and prosper.
Star Trek photo
Going where no new Trek has gone before
The rebooted Star Trek franchise hasn't really had a bad movie. J.J. Abrams put together two highly entertaining pieces of cinema back to back. However, if you're a Star Trek fan Into Darkness was concerning. A...

Godzilla Resurgence photo
Godzilla Resurgence

The new Godzilla Resurgence trailer is full of gravitas, pathos, and splosions


You'll cry, and you'll kaboom
Jul 19
// Hubert Vigilla
I wasn't that much of a fan of Gareth Edwards' 2014 Godzilla. While well-shot, the story was so-so and focused too much on Aaron Taylor-Johnson's bland lead character. It didn't help that Blandy McBlanderson was surrounded by...
Star Trek photo
Kirk's dad got famous
We all heard the rumors, but now it is official. Star Trek will carry on into a fourth film, which probably isn't too surprising to anyone. The rebooted franchise has been a moneymaker for the studio and the movies haven't th...

Star Wars photo
What are you bringing to the table?
Update: Official poster added. Original: Rogue One: A Star Wars Story might actually excite me more than the the main franchise films. Gareth Edwards directing what is basically a space samurai/war film in the orig...

Power Rangers photo
Power Rangers

SDCC Power Rangers movie character posters have colors


Morphing, right? That's what they do?
Jul 14
// Matthew Razak
Nick made me post these. They have primary colors in them (along with others) and are probably the teaser for a trailer landing soon. 
Dark Tower photo
Dark Tower

First look at Idris Elba in The Dark Tower


And a very photoshopped EW cover
Jul 14
// Matthew Razak
If everything goes to plan Stephen King's Dark Tower adaptations will be a long running movie and TV franchise and it all officially kicks off with this image (and a cover) of Idris Elba as the gunslinger Roland and a fe...

Review: Equals

Jul 14 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220427:42901:0[/embed] EqualsDirector: Drake DoremusRating: PG-13Release Date: July 15, 2016 (limited) In order to maintain a tranquilized world, the characters of Equals avoid intimate contact with one another, living alone in apartments that are modular and compartmentalized to maximize space. Everything has a kind of mechanical efficiency, including the way people walk purposefully like automatons. We're told of a wild outside world early in the film as Silas (Nicholas Hoult) works on images for a book of speculative non-fiction. He begins to show symptoms of emotions, which the world of the film refers to as "switched on syndrome" or SOS. High-level SOS is considered terminal. Part of Silas' SOS is rooted in his growing attraction to co-worker Nia (Kristen Stewart). Stewart's withdrawn and wounded gaze suggests she may be going through the same surge of emotions. They give in to this growing desire, because if two centuries of dystopian literature has taught us anything, love, sex, and the basic biological imperatives of lust offer some private liberation--an act of rebellion, even-- from the prisons that characters have imposed upon them. The world of Equals is a world of individuals kept apart but level through drugs and the trappings of an egalitarian society, which gives Silas and Nia's trysts in a company bathroom an added charge. Being human: it's messy, it's clumsy, but it feels great sometimes. Silas and Nia are essentially a pair of gaga-eyed teens, and they exchange the kind of first-love niceties you'd have with a high school boyfriend or girlfriend. Their words have an embarrassing earnestness to them, but it's because the words hang between them, connect them, and bring them closer together. Their fear of getting caught leads them to a sympathetic band of SOS patients who can offer sympathy and maybe even a way out. This all sounds a little too familiar, sure, and the clean aesthetic and cool-to-warm color scheme are predictable, albeit so competently often effectively executed. It's the nature of the subject matter and the long history of tropes associated with dystopias; the same goes for science fiction about deadening or mastering human emotions. Director Drake Doremus and screenwriter Nathan Parker don't bring much novelty to their future world, and yet I found something potent in the way Equals explored the stigmatization of depression, much of which is self-imposed. When Silas' co-workers discover he has SOS, they treat him as if he's got an infectious disease. They isolate him so they won't catch what he has, and he internalizes this aversion, which seems to increase his degree of SOS; isolation begetting isolation. People who conceal their undiagnosed SOS are called "hiders," a not too subtle reference. Equals is something of a cutter narrative or teenage depression narrative with just a touch, however chintzy, of Romeo and Juliet. While the world Silas and Nia inhabit is superficially utopian but a dystopia within, characters with SOS are inwardly depressed or dysphoric but forced to hide beneath an even-keeled veneer. They're the perfect kinds of citizens for this medicated hellscape. It's those little things that made Equals enjoyable. Its metaphor held solid while I acknowledge the elements surrounding it seemed shaky. If not shaky, then maybe too similar to things I've seen before. But again we have that outer/inner distinction that I've continually mentioned in this review. On the outside Equals is your standard-issue dystopian yarn with just a little bit of love for the misfit teenage set, but within there's something different and more messily human than the surface suggests.
Review: Equals photo
Star-crossed depression and dystopia
Any society that appears outwardly utopian is really just a nicely packaged dystopia. The orgiastic bacchanal of Logan's Run was really just an ugly form of institutionalized ignorance and population control. Gattaca was a st...

Stranger Things photo
Stranger Things

First trailer for Netflix's Stranger Things


Like old school Spielberg made a TV show
Jun 09
// Matthew Razak
When J.J. Abrams delivered Super 8 to us I reveled in its unabashed homage of classic Spielberg adventure films. I kind of wondered why it hadn't kicked off a bit of a renaissance of the 1980s supernatural film, but alas...
Pacific Rim 2 photo
Pacific Rim 2

Pacific Rim 2 comes roaring back with John Boyega


Twist: he's playing a Kaiju
Jun 06
// Matthew Razak
Man, did I want a Pacific Rim 2 to happen. Not because I especially loved the first one, but because I thought it wasted a ton of potential that a second move could capitalize on. It didn't look like we ever would see a ...
Star Trek photo
Star Trek

Check out the first teaser for CBS's new Star Trek


It's new, new, new!
May 19
// Matthew Razak
News of a new Star Trek got me very excited, especially when I heard it would take place in the original universe not Abrams. I enjoy Abrams verse, actually, but I think a TV show is better suited for the old verse. This...
Tetris Trilogy photo
Tetris Trilogy

Tetris is getting a big budget, Chinese trilogy


Form rows in the theater for points
May 17
// Nick Valdez
This year we have four videogame adaptations hitting theaters and there's no sign of stopping anytime soon. The only problem with this is none of these films look particularly gripping with Warcraft, Assassin's Creed, an...
X-Files photo
X-Files

Fox Exec says everyone will be back for new X-Files season


But do we want to go back?
May 16
// Matthew Razak
I watched X-Files when I was growing up like Malcom McDowll watched propaganda. You couldn't tear my eyes away. I couldn't even finish the season 10 reboot. That's why it's with much trepidation that I'm reporting that&n...
BioShock Twilight Zone photo
A dimension of sound, sight, and of mind
BioShock director Ken Levine is teaming with Interlude to explore the intersection of gaming and film: his next stop is The Twilight Zone. According to Wired, Levine and Interlude are finalizing their deal to use the tropes a...

Review: Hardcore Henry

Apr 10 // Nick Valdez
[embed]220494:42906:0[/embed] Hardcore HenryDirector: Ilya NaishullerRating: RRelease Date: April 8th, 2016 Cheesy as it is, Hardcore Henry is about you. When "Henry" (the audience) wakes up in a mysterious facility with no memory of how he got there, his wife Estelle (Haley Bennett) explains that he's suffered major disfigurement from an accident and this facility has put him back together using machinery (basically a more violent version of the Six Million Dollar Man). Then some shadow organization chases Henry down for 90 minutes. And all while during this, a mysterious man named Jimmy (Sharlto Copley) and his many faces seems to be the only one who knows what's going on.  While I'd hate to classify the film in such basic terms, comparisons to a videogame narrative are unfortunately apt. Hardcore Henry gleefully revels in juvenile wish fulfillment. You'll sit back and watch Henry mow down waves of spawning enemies (with little to nothing to distinguish between any of them), you'll see him utilize a variety of weapons he apparently loots from dead bodies, and you'll watch as he peers around corridors and fights in hallways. Every trope from first person shooter videogames is represented and, for a while, it's fun to see unfold. Characters make quips, the first person perspective leads to some enlightening action angles, and there's definitely a joy and humor to how grotesque its violence gets as it goes on. But after about fifteen minutes of these action scenes, the premise wears thin and the film turns into a collection of hollow gore shots trying to outdo one another in order to garner some kind of reaction. And that's only including the ones you can manage to follow.  Hardcore Henry is so focused on how cool things might look it forgets to tell any kind of story. The film essentially puts all of its eggs in one basket as it hopes the flow of the action will keep you invested. Unlike most action films, Henry's voiceless and faceless protagonist can't add anything to the overarching story. He's got no personality, no defining traits other than a relentless need to kill (for some reason that's never quite elaborated on), and it's not like Henry is an all inclusive point of view either as there as some unfortunate homophobic jokes thrown in the mix and it's heavily male friendly as it vies for that sweet 13 year old Mountain Dew demographic. So you can't even fully immerse yourself as a viewer as multiple moments in the narrative remind you Henry isn't you. At least when videogame narratives do things like this, it eventually hands back control to the individual and gives you other options for immersion. There's just nothing here to latch onto.  The film's one saving grace is by and far Sharlto Copley. He's an absolute joy every time he's on screen. It's just a shame he has to singlehandedly carry the film's weight. He's stuck providing so much exposition, jokes, and personality it's kind of running him thin. It's also not helped by the unintelligible scene settings. Henry ends up in several locations with no way other than Copley's Jimmy to help discern where the action is taking place. The film could take place anywhere between an entire city length and the walking distance between my kitchen and bathroom. The film's main device seems to be holding it back in that visual respect. In reference to an old Simpsons gag, every time Jimmy wasn't on screen I felt myself wondering when he was going to show up again. But I wonder if that's because I wanted more of Copley or I was just starved for something to get me through the rest of the film like a lone floating log in the middle of Hardcore Henry's bleak and monotonous ocean of gore.  Hardcore Henry touts itself as a cinematic experience. The first action film of its kind, it's certainly going to get a lot of attention and praise based on existence alone. But it's lacking the level of immersion or direction its premise promises. If I really had to compare it to videogames, watching Hardcore Henry is like going over to a buddy's house and watching him play a game for an hour. It looks neat, and there are bound to be some things that grab your attention, but before long you'll be so bored you'd rather be at home. 
Hardcore Review photo
Normcore
From its inception as music videos for director Ilya Naishuller's band Biting Elbows, Hardcore Henry boasted an unique central idea: crafting a well told action film entirely through the first person perspective on Go Pro cam...

Star Wars photo
What will you become?
Gareth Edwards is directing a Star Wars movie. The man who has helped to redefine how you direct large objects hurtling at each other has his hands on the Death Star and all of a galaxy far, far away. I mean, that's a fa...

RIP Erik Bauersfeld (1922-2016)

Apr 05 // Hubert Vigilla
RIP Erik Bauersfeld photo
The voice of Admiral Ackbar has passed
While you may not know Erik Bauersfeld by name, he's the man behind one of the most memorable moments in Return of the Jedi. As the Rebel Alliance fleet closes in on the second Death Star, Lando realizes the shields are still...

ND/NF Review: Evolution

Mar 21 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220389:42858:0[/embed] EvolutionDirector: Lucile HadzihalilovicRelease Date: TBDRating: TBDCountry: France The world of Evolution is mysterious from the get go, which is due largely to the coastal locale where the film is set. We don't know what year it is, or quite where this place is either. It's all so otherworldly, the sort of setting for tales, allegories, and de Chirico paintings. There are white stucco buildings built near the water, and the sand is black leading to the turbulent shore. It's beautiful in how stark it is. In the distance, there's a medical facility that looks like it was abandoned years ago, but boys and their mothers walk back and forth for periodic examinations. There are only grown women and young boys on this island. There are no men, there are no girls, and the mothers have a sinister uniformity about them. At night, the mothers leave their homes carrying hand lanterns and congregate near the water. The boys are just boys but are in the dark about their caretakers. The boys are raised on a diet of mashed kelp and something like worms, one of those foods that while heated in a saucepan still looks cold when it's served. Evolution centers primarily on Nicolas (Max Brebant) and his mother (Julie-Marie Parmentier), and what Nicolas discovers about this town and where babies come from. We follow him into the night, down long corridors, to water in the dark, and in the process participate in the act of discovery, unwrapping the allegory along with Nicolas, sharing in his repulsion and curiosity. Roughly midway through Evolution, this dive into the unknown slows, maybe too much for what's revealed about the mothers and their boys. Yet even what's revealed is just enough to suggest larger possibilities and delve deeper into the thematic territory of the movie--sex, childbirth, asexuality, violation, flesh, reproduction, biological processes. I sensed in the film's lull that Hadzihalilovic was signalling a move away from an explicit exploration of the plot and the machinery of the world to a series of ruminative brushstrokes, each one a deliberate move to the film's finale, which is more conceptual than visceral. In the immediate aftermath of Evolution, I felt a little let down, expecting more of a resolution to what's introduced early on. Yet the movie has this strange, lingering quality thanks to its pervasive otherworldliness. I mentioned Lovecraft and Cronenbeg earlier, but Hadzihalilovic makes this movie her own, invested with unique hobbyhorses and a fascinating sensibility. It's rare to see a movie that sticks around in your mind after an initial sense of disappointment. The fact I'm still thinking about Evolution, and deeper now than in the hours after the first viewing, have made me reevaluate Hadzihalilovic's languid pace, which unfolds with the same speed as a dream verging on a nightmare but never quite arriving there. Cinematographer Manuel Dacosse does a magnificent job in rendering these images and giving them such a haunting quality that I can't get several of them out of my head. Evolution's grown on me, like a skin graft or like coral, or maybe it's grown in me, like the stuff of recurring bad dreams.
Review: Evolution photo
Lingering, haunting, and yet
There's so much going for Lucile Hadzihalilovic's Evolution, a film expertly lensed from the deliberate first shot: looking up to the sky from underwater. From beneath, the ripples and waves on the ocean surface produce undul...

Review: The Divergent Series: Allegiant - Part 1

Mar 18 // Matthew Razak
[embed]220415:42865:0[/embed] The Divergent Series: Allegiant - Part 1Director: Robert SchwentkeRated: PG-13Release Date: March 18, 2016 In the interest of being open I did not see the second film in the series, Insurgence. Evidently nothing really important happened in it since I could easily pick up from where I'd left off after seeing the first one. The bad guys were defeated leaving divergents Tris (Shailene Woodley) and boyfriend Four (Theo James) victorious. Her brother Caleb (Ansel Elgort) is captured and comic relief Peter (Miles Teller) is running around being snarky. Tris wants to escape the walled off Chicago for the outside world as it has been revealed that their entire lives were an experiment to make divergents. However, the city gets locked down as the internal struggles start a civil war. That leads Tris and the rest of the cast to escape the city and find the lab that watches over the experiment and its director David (Jeff Daniels). From here a post-apocalyptic plot of epic stupidity unfolds, every turn making less sense than the next. Those that have read the book series say that it begins to get truly bad in the third book where it appears that the author really didn't know where she was going with the story. That seems blatantly clear from the film too as much of the plot's key point rely on twists and turns that make no sense or feel forced. Bad guys doing illogical things is a key staple of what bad guys do in movies, but in this case the bad guys aren't just illogical, but incompetent. Time and time again decisions are made that only serve as plot devices so the good guys can win, but make no sense in the world around them. It's bad plotting, bad world creation and bad movie making.  Speaking of bad film making, the cheapness continues to prevail in this series. Whether it's the special effects or what seem to be some of the worst extras ever caught on screen the movie feels budget in every aspect. Green screens often look like they simply hung a sheet up in the background and projected the image behind the actor. There's shots that look like the digital effects people just gave up halfway through. An early explosion looks like something you'd see in a SyFy made-for-TV movie, not a movie trying to be a blockbuster franchise. The end result is a film that feels cheap. Director Robert Schwenke doesn't do anything to ease this feeling. His direction is blunt, crude and cliche all while lacking any ability to tie a scene together. It would be harmless at the very least, but there are times where it is so poor that it actually made the audience laugh. He's working with a dramaless plot, but that still doesn't excuse his inability to raise the heart rate during action sequences. He has a cast made up of some of Hollywood's most talented youngsters and he can't do anything with them. Not that any of them seem to be trying. The overall tone of every performance seems to be regret. When this series started all these actors were still trying to make a mark, but now the majority of them are far too good to be showing up in a budget sci-fi movie like this. Teller feels especially lackadaisical throughout the film while Elgory appears to be searching for the nearest exit for most of the movie. The only person who didn't seem to get the memo about not caring is Daniels, but unfortunately the screenplay gives him next to nothing to work with. Allegiant is exactly what you get when you try to copy and paste a formula that succeeded elsewhere. It's cheap and lackluster, and it's hard to imagine what another entire film is even going to be about or why anyone would want to see it after sitting through this one.  
Divergent photo
Still not Hunger Games
When the first film in the Divergent series came out it was pretty obvious what was going on. Lionsgate wanted a Hunger Games so they found a young adult series with a post-apocalyptic setting and cast an up-and-com...

Review: 10 Cloverfield Lane

Mar 11 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220396:42854:0[/embed] 10 Cloverfield LaneDirector: Dan TrachtenbergRelease Date: March 11, 2016Rating: PG-13 Rather than a Cloverfield sequel, 10 Cloverfield Lane is a taut thriller spun out of a Twilight Zone conceit. In fact, it's a bit unfortnate that it carries the name Cloverfield and was billed as a spiritual sequel or blood relative to the 2008 film. I can foresee a lot of moviegoers being upset given the expectations they had going in, but really, 10 Cloverfield Lane deserves to be taken on its own terms. Sure, the movie will make more money thanks to the Cloverfield name, though it's a bit of a disservice to its content, which stands on its own as a strong feature film debut by director Dan Trachtenberg, and a great vehicle for its three stars: Mary Elizabeth Winstead, John Goodman, and John Gallagher, Jr. There's something a little Hitchcockian about the opening of 10 Cloverfield Lane, though that's thanks in large part to Bear McCreary's score, which has plenty of echoes of Bernard Hermann. Michelle (Winstead) is a woman driving away from her past who's involved in a horrible car accident. When she comes to, she's chained up in an underground survival bunker that belongs to a man named Howard (Goodman). They're joined by an injured guy named Emmet (Gallagher), who claims to have run to the bunker for safety just as something unspeakable was happening above ground. The tension of 10 Cloverfield Lane stems from Michelle's uncertainty about this whole situation; the movie's set-up is a mystery box from which she's trying to escape. We're similarly left trying to figure out who Emmet and Howard really are and what their motives might be. Trachtenberg stages the unfolding drama through claustrophobic angles, carefully doling out sinister hints, red herrings, and brief moments of levity. It keeps the audience guessing what's to come and reassessing what's come before. There's the question of what's happened to the world (if anything), and whether or not the potential danger above ground is better than staying below. Howard's got a military background (or does he?) and claims the air's contaminated (or is it?), and that they may have to stay in his bunker for a year or two before it's safe to go out again. As an actor, Goodman's always been able to switch between kind and sinister with ease. His roles in Barton Fink and The Big Lebowski come to mind. Howard's made of mood swings, vacillating between good-hearted and unhinged. As he shows Michelle around the bunker, he calmly notes that the dinner table is a family heirloom, which means they have to use coasters and placemats at all times. Later, a calculated little touch of the fingers between Michelle and Emmet throws Howard into a rage, causing him to slam his fist on the table. Unreal domesticity has its own special kind of dread. Kathy Bates in Misery might be the best unit of comparison for Howard, with a good dose of Michael Shannon in Take Shelter for added flavor, but Goodman makes the role his own. Casting him makes perfect sense--who else could simultaneously play loving father and creepy uncle? Howard is so imposing, and Goodman could run away with the film (he only sort of does), so it's a good thing he has a strong counterpoint in Michelle. Winstead proves herself a more than capable as the film's hero. Her immediate instinct is escape, and as soon as she's in the bunker, she demonstrates her knack for craftiness and improvisation. She's a fighter, and maybe a lesser movie would paint her as a victim or a mere captor for most of the film's runtime. Instead we get someone strong from the start, and who is much more resourceful than she gives herself credit for. She's got layers still untapped, and there are plenty of twists as Michelle figures out what's going on in this mystery box. For Michelle, like so much about 10 Cloverfield Lane, there's a lot under the surface that's thrilling to discover.
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