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videogames

Rampage adaptation photo
Rampage adaptation

Director of Rampage adapation starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson promises emotion, scares


Kaiju candy asses gonna freak out
Dec 02
// Hubert Vigilla
In case you forgot (why would you remember?), an adaptation of Rampage has been in the works for years. The film seems to have some actual legs on it now that Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson is attached to star with San Andreas dir...
Detective Pikachu photo
Detective Pikachu

Detective Pikachu movie catches a director


Still holding out hope for Danny Devito
Dec 01
// Nick Valdez
After a secret, yet massive bidding war, Legendary won the rights to produce a Pokemon related film. So they began moving forward with an adaptation of Great Detective Pikachu, a CG/live-action hybrid where a talking Pikachu ...
Doctor Strange 8-bit photo
Doctor Strange 8-bit

Marvel's Doctor Strange gets the 8-Bit Cinema treatment, looks a little like Mega Man


By the sprightly pixels of Capcom!
Nov 30
// Hubert Vigilla
I really liked Doctor Strange. While lots of the MCU tends to blend together visually and tonally, Strange had tilty fractals and psychedelic wonder, and on the whole the film felt more like a kung fu movie than just a s...
Assassin's Creed clip photo
Assassin's Creed clip

Michael Fassbender enters the Animus in this Assassin's Creed clip


Shake hands with the past
Nov 29
// Hubert Vigilla
The Assassin's Creed movie is less than a month away. I'm lukewarm but interested, and at least willing to give it a shot based on the talent involved. The film brings together Michael Fassbender, Marion Cotillard, and direct...

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Mortal Kombat reboot finds its director


Friendship... again?
Nov 21
// Geoff Henao
We've known about the Mortal Kombat reboot for some time now, but news and updates have been very slim over the past few years. Following the amazing Mortal Kombat: Legacy webseries, it made sense to have Kevin Tanchareon, th...
Clueless Gamer: FF XV photo
Clueless Gamer: FF XV

Watch Conan O'Brien and Elijah Wood get bored and angry at Final Fantasy XV


"WHY WOULD SOMEONE PLAY THIS?!"
Nov 16
// Hubert Vigilla
The Clueless Gamer bits on Conan are a lot of fun to watch. Sure, Conan O'Brien isn't a gamer and is more of a snarky smart aleck, but his overall assessment of what he's seeing is brutally, acerbically honest. In case you mi...
Beware the Slenderman photo
Beware the Slenderman

The trailer for Beware the Slenderman will creep you out and disturb you


When memes turn into folklore and murder
Nov 13
// Hubert Vigilla
The Slender Man stabbing in 2014 was disturbing to say the least. Two 12-year-old girls in Waukesha, Wisconsin stabbed another girl 19 times in order to appease the Slender Man, a fictional modern day bogeyman born on the int...

Review: Pokemon: The First Movie

Nov 03 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221011:43182:0[/embed] Pokemon: The First MovieDirectors: Kunihiko Yuyama and Michael HaigneyRating: GRelease Date: November 6, 1999 (USA); November 1, 2016 (special event re-release) When a group of scientists sucessfully clone an ancient pokemon known as Mew, the resulting super pokemon breaks loose and wreaks havoc. The super clone, Mewtwo (Philip Bartlett), now in search of a purpose, invites the strongest pokemon trainers to a mysterious island to battle him. Ash Ketchum (Veronica Taylor), together with his friends Misty (Rachael Lillis), Brock (Eric Stuart), and Pikachu, meet Mewtwo's challenge and soon figure out there's more to this pokemon than they realized.  First things first, The First Movie is incredibly brisk. Choosing not to overstay its welcome (if you don't include the Pikachu's Island Adventure short), it instead tightly focuses on developing its central antagonist. Mewtwo themself is well defined with a clear existential crisis (as they try to clear the clouds of their mind, not so subtly represented by the storm they whip up with their powers), and it's a greater deal of characterization than anyone else gets in the film. It's such a well put together back story, in fact, it's surprising The First Movie is able to explore as much thematic territory as it does. It ends up questioning the philosophy behind the Pokémon series in full as it briefly challenges the "fighting vs. battling" argument within the Poké world. The film doesn't get as deep as I would've hoped, as the argument gives way to a hokey climax, but this amount of self-awareness is impressive for a children's film.  The laser focus on Mewtwo may help the film's pace within its short run time (as it rarely goes on tangents), but it's hard to care about anyone else involved with the plot since they fail to get the same attention. Since the film assumes the audience has working knowledge of the Pokémon TV series, and it's a fair assumption given the branding, Ash and his friends (along with Team Rocket, introduced into the plot in a Rosencrantz/Gildenstern, outsider looking in fashion) don't really have a reason to be involved. Their usual schtick of wandering into a plot in motion may work for a TV series needing a fresh story every week, but it falls flat here. Along with introducing seemingly important ancillary characters (like the kidnapped Nurse Joy or the random lady who knows storms or something) only to serve no purpose, The First Movie fails to turn Ash into a compelling protagonist.  With no real personality of his own, Ash instead becomes a moral mouthpiece. His base love for his pokemon is exaggerated into a love for everything and grand declarations of peace. It's a far cry from an Ash who, just minutes before, was willing to pit his pokemon against Mewtwo. The First Movie betrays its emotional themes with its own world, really. It's greater desire to stop senseless violence goes against everything Pokémon is known for. So it's okay to use your pokemon to fight when they use their abilities? Since there's never a clear difference between how Mewtwo forces a fight and how trainers could force a fight, the overall moral is clouded. Rather than focus on, say, the friendship between trainers and their pokes (thus enhancing its narrative overall), the film goes with a generic message. It almost feels like a cop out.  But in the end, Pokémon: The First Movie makes up for its shortcomings with pure entertainment value. Once you get passed the cheesy dialogue (complete with puns and jokes that didn't age well in the slightest) and the murky themes (which I give the film credit for attempting), there are plenty of rewards in store. A well written antagonist, slick animation, and a score that includes the ironically lovable "Brother Against Brother" song.  No matter what score I put here, it literally doesn't matter. You love it, you hate it, you already had an opinion 18 years in the making. But it was great to confirm that I liked a good thing back then, instead of figuring out yet another product from my childhood was hot garbage. My critic brain may settle on "Good," but my nostalgic one adds about 30 points. 
Pokemon The First Movie photo
"...and we succeeded"
One weekend, too many years ago, I spent a night over at my aunt's place. She didn't have cable, but she had a VCR. Which meant I could watch any movie I brought with me when I was bored of doing dumb kid stuff. Not thinking ...

Deadpool director Tim Miller now working on the Sonic the Hedgehog movie

Oct 31 // Hubert Vigilla
If this doesn't get trapped in development hell, it will be Fowler's directorial debut. Aside from his work on animated shorts, Fowler's most notable credit is part of animation research and development for Spike Jonze's 2009 adaptation of Where the Wild Things Are. We reported on the live-action/CG Sonic the Hedgehog movie earlier this year. As it stands, the movie is still aiming for a 2018 release. What do you think about a Sonic film with this creative team? Is there someone else who should be at the helm? Are your dreams now tainted by this devilishy sexy image? Let us know in the comments. [via THR/Heat Vision]
Sonic the Hedgehog movie photo
Miller on as executive producer
Tim Miller recently left the sequel to Deadpool over creative differences with Ryan Reynolds, which included clashes over tone and the casting of Cable. As Deadpool 2 looks for a new director, Miller has set his sights on a n...

Super Mario: Underworld photo
Super Mario: Underworld

Happy Halloween: Watch the horror short Super Mario: Underworld


Itsa terrifying hellscape!
Oct 31
// Hubert Vigilla
Happy Halloween, you ghouls. Hope your weekend was fun. Did you dress up? Did you go to a party? Did you lose some teeth? And, hey, did you wind up barefoot in a laundromat like last year? Yeah, I bet you did, you scamp! To g...
Assassin's Creed photo
Assassin's Creed

Behind-the-scenes Assassin's Creed featurette focuses on stunts, parkour, practical effects


Kick, punch, it's all in your mind
Oct 27
// Hubert Vigilla
2016 is drawing to a close, which means we're that much closer to the Assassin's Creed film adaptation. In this recently released behind-the-scenes featurette, we see star Michael Fassbender and director Justin Kurzel talk ab...
Uwe Boll retires photo
Uwe Boll retires

Horrible director Uwe Boll says he will quit making terrible movies... again


Goodnight, schlock prince
Oct 26
// Hubert Vigilla
After years of making crummy video game adaptations and low-rent garbage, Uwe Boll claims that he will quit directing movies. This comes on the heels of his supposed swan song, Rampage: President Down. From the title alone, i...
Uncharted film adaptation photo
Uncharted film adaptation

Shawn Levy will direct the Uncharted film adaptation


Ben Stiller as Nathan Drake?
Oct 26
// Hubert Vigilla
It looks like that Uncharted adaptation is moving forward again. Sony has tapped Shawn Levy (Night at the Museum, Real Steel) to direct the film from a script by Joe Carnahan (The Grey). Carnahan was at one time attached to d...
Pokemon: The First Movie photo
Pokemon: The First Movie

Pokemon: The First Movie is coming back to theaters October 29th and November 1st


Gotta catch em at Cinemark
Oct 24
// Hubert Vigilla
The popularity of Pokemon Go spawned a forthcoming Detective Pikachu movie from Legendary Pictures. With the Pokemon resurgence, it should come as no surprise that the Pokemon Company is going to milk all of its adorable...
Resident Evil photo
Resident Evil

NYCC: Resident Evil: The Final Chapter really is the final chapter


... or not
Oct 07
// Matthew Razak
One of the bigger spots for NYCC was the upcoming Resident Evil: The Final Chapter. Somehow this franchise has survived and brought us kicking and screaming with it through the ups and downs. We've seen the first trailer, but...
Fruit Ninja photo
Fruit Ninja

New Line Cinema will release Fruit Ninja film, first plot details revealed


Drain your brain batteries
Sep 25
// Hubert Vigilla
As we previously reported, there is a film adaptation of Fruit Ninja in the works because money. The film rights have been picked up by New Line Cinema because produce and money, too. In the brief Hollywood Reporter piece on ...
8-bit Justice League photo
8-bit Justice League

Zack Snyder's Justice League gets an 8-bit trailer (more like 16-bit)


Also with a nod to JLU
Sep 19
// Hubert Vigilla
Zack Snyder has been pretty good about hyping his Justice League movie on Twitter lately. In the last week he's released an image of Batman's tactical batsuit and a first look at J. K. Simmons as Commissioner Gordon. The bigg...
Level Up photo
Level Up

Check out this exclusive clip of Level Up


Gamer gets into actual game
Sep 18
// Matthew Razak
Level Up is kind of a weird beast. It's about a "gamer" who gets caught up in a "game" after his girlfriend his kidnapped by a mysterious group. As you can see in the clip they start making him do some weird things like ...
Pokemon Generations photo
Pokemon Generations

Watch the trailer for Pokemon Generations, a new animated web series coming to YouTube


Make it so, Pikachu
Sep 13
// Hubert Vigilla
Not too long ago we reported on the live-action Detective Pikachu Pokemon movie being put together by Legendary. Since that project is just getting underway, here's another Pokemon project to whet your appetite: Pokemon Gener...
Assassin's Creed images photo
Assassin's Creed images

Michael Fassbender is like "Come at me, bro!" in these new Assassin's Creed images


Do you even leap of faith, brah?
Sep 13
// Hubert Vigilla
The end of the year is fast approaching, which means that the Assassin's Creed movie is almost upon us. While the people over at Ubisoft seemed to downplay box office expectations, this film may turn a pretty decent profit li...
Friday the 13th: The Game photo
Friday the 13th: The Game

Jason Vorhees does a bunch of fatalities in this trailer for Friday the 13th: The Game


Ka-ka-ka... ki-ki-kill-- FRIENDSHIP!?
Sep 06
// Hubert Vigilla
The Friday the 13th series has always been a reliable franchise for gorehounds. The movies are full of gruesome death scenes, and each Jason Vorhees murder often amounted to a form of slapstick sadism. My favorite might be th...
Warcraft sequel photo
Warcraft sequel

Duncan Jones would still like to make Warcraft 2, comments on director's cut of first film


"Maybe I'm just being a masochist."
Aug 31
// Hubert Vigilla
Warcraft had a rough go critically but was able to make money thanks to the foreign box office (particularly China). While a sequel seems unlikely, director Duncan Jones is still game to make the movie given all of the time a...
Angry Birds Movie sequel photo
Angry Birds Movie sequel

An Angry Birds Movie sequel is in the works, so here's that Sean Penn meme


Money, money, money, money, money, money
Aug 26
// Hubert Vigilla
The Angry Birds Movie made $347 million worldwide, so they're making a sequel. Are you happy now, Earth? There are no plot or story details at the moment, but money-money-money, ergo sequel. I haven't seen the film, but I ass...
Assassin's Creed photo
Assassin's Creed

The Assassin's Creed movie is doing the Leap of Faith for real


Jump around
Aug 15
// Matthew Razak
You know when you're playing Assassin's Creed and you dive off a really tall building in the iconic Leap of Faith jump and then you think, "That could never happen in real life." Well, it can... kind of. While the stunt ...

Review: Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV

Aug 15 // Geoff Henao
[embed]220778:43047:0[/embed] Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XVDirector: Takeshi NozueRating: PG-13Release Date: August 19, 2016  Kingsglaive takes place in a fantasy world (Eos) made up of multiple countries that historically held magical crystals with extraordinary powers. In the present world, however, the kingdom of Lucis is the only nation to possess a crystal, which they use to create a force field to protect its citizens. The crystal grants powers through the Ring of the Lucii, which has traditionally been passed down the line of Lucis' kings. Meanwhile, the empire of Niflheim has used their advanced weapon technology to conquer all of the world's kingdoms, leaving Lucis as the only nation able to withstand its attacks. The film opens with an introduction to the world and its governmental mythos, specifically introducing us to Regis Lucis Caelum CXIII (Bean) and his son, Noctis, in the country of Tenebrae, where Noctis was recovering from an undisclosed near-death illness. However, their meeting is ambushed by Niflheim soldiers attempting to assassinate both Regis and Noctis, leaving the queen of Tenebrae murdered. Regis attempts to flee with Noctis and the Tenebrae princess, Lunafreya Nox Fleuret (played as an adult by Headey), but she decides to stay behind to protect her injured brother. Ten years pass, and the war between Niflheim and Lucis is still raging on. Regis has created an army force, the Kingsglaive, to protect Lucis against both monster and Niflheim attacks. Kingsglaive centers itself on three primary members - Nyx (Paul), Crowe, and Libertus. Nyx is the hero/savior type, Crowe is the stereotypical female badass, and Libertus is the well-meaning, but over-emotional friend. Sensing that Lucis will succumb to Niflheim's relentless attacks, Regis agrees to relinquish control over all of Lucis' territories outside of Insomnia, where the palace resides, and marry Noctis to Lunafreya, in order to sign a peace treaty. However, this peace agreement causes waves among the Kingsglaive that will change the face of Lucis forever. Gamers that have played modern Final Fantasy entries will feel at home with Kingsglaive's visuals. The entire feature feels like an exended cutscene taken directly out of the games. However, in saying that, it feels too gamey. While the film looks damned good, it never felt like it could stand toe-to-toe with any other Hollywood CGI feature film. Visual Works, the division within Square Enix that primarily developed Kingsglaive, has the ability to create something truly worthwhile, as seen in the multitude of action scenes and dating as far back as Advent Children. If only they had the freedom to create something new and original without the need to tie to a video game, but Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within still casts a large enough shadow to prevent Square Enix from taking that leap of faith. And it's this fear that ultimately holds the entire film back. Set as a prequel to Final Fantasy XV, many of the plot points and characters in Kingsglaive are meant to be Kingsglaive-exclusive and will probably have no real bearing or mention in Final Fantasy XV beyond easter eggs or "wink-wink" references to die-hard fans. Yes, Regis, Lunafreya, and the Niflheim antagonists will play large roles in the game, but Final Fantasy XV's main brotherhood of Noctis, Prompto, Ignis, and Gladiolus aren't present in the film outside of a post-credits scene. Kingsglaive is meant to set the tone for Final Fantasy XV's world and to flesh out themes and plots that were too large to be explored in the game proper, but I couldn't help but brush off how greatly unnecessary it is in the grand scheme of things. Will I appreciate Final Fantasy XV more because of Kingsglaive? Probably. Will you miss out on key story arcs and plot points in Final Fantasy XV if you skip Kingsglaive? Definitely not. It's a shame, too, because Kingsglaive does have the star power of Paul, Headey, and Bean to help make Kingsglaive better than what it's supposed to be; honestly, I feel these castings were meant to add surface-level levity and PR fluff to an otherwise average film. The performances themselves are pretty standard of what you'd expect from Headey and Bean, although Paul's performance had flashes of his ability to break out of the typecasting his successful take on Breaking Bad unfortunately left him.  It's hard to critique a multimedia tie-in of its own accord rather than how it stands on its own when said tie-in's purpose is to supplement the main product. It's because of this that Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV ultimately fails to stand up as a true self-contained piece. If Kingsglaive were to be shed of its relationship to Final Fantasy XV and given the space and freedom to tell its own story, this would be an entirely different review. As a gamer who will dedicate at least 100 hours into Final Fantasy XV, I can appreciate Kingsglaive for what it is. As a film critic, however, I can't look past Kingsglaive's inherent fluff factor. With that said, correlate your expectations of the film with you interest in Final Fantasy XV before you decide to devote time to watching the film.
Final Fantasy photo
Prequel: Final Fantasy XV
Gamers know the storied saga of Final Fantasy XV's decade-long production marred by platform changes, thematic upheavals, and personnel moves. It wasn't until this past spring that the scope of the Final Fantasy XV Universe w...

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Is that a triple barrel shotgun?
If you had told me that back in 2002 the Resident Evil movie -- a fun enough action horror flick -- would spawn one of the longer running and relatively successful action series in cinematic history I would have cut you ...

Max Landis Pokemon pitch photo
Max Landis Pokemon pitch

Max Landis discusses his rejected Pokemon pitch because he is Max Landis


Max Landis is gonna Max Landis
Jul 25
// Hubert Vigilla
Last week we reported that Legendary will bring Detective Pikachu to the big screen some time in the future, a project propelled in part by the popularity of Pokemon Go. Detective Pikachu seems like an unexpected way to do a ...
MST3K Netflix photo
MST3K Netflix

The Mystery Science Theater 3000 revival will be on Netflix


And some familiar faces are back
Jul 25
// Hubert Vigilla
After breaking Kickstarter records, the new cast of Mystery Science Theater 3000 has found a home. And no, I'm not talking about the Satellite of Love. They announced during San Diego Comic-Con that the MST3K revival will be ...
Kingsglaive: Final Fantas photo
Kingsglaive: Final Fantas

Watch the official trailer for Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV


I assume Sean Bean's character will die
Jul 24
// Hubert Vigilla
Earlier in the year we mentioned there'd be a CGI Final Fantasy XV movie as well as other spin-offs set in the world of the game. Now just two months before Final Fantasy XV's release, we have a full trailer for one of these ...
The Lost Arcade photo
The Lost Arcade

Watch the trailer for The Lost Arcade, a documentary on NYC's Chinatown Fair


A look at New York's arcade culture
Jul 23
// Hubert Vigilla
As someone who still wears the occasional onion on his belt, I remember arcades quite fondly. They were in steady decline when I was a kid, but they were a good way to kill time at the mall or to spend a Sunday morning. They'...
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Legendary Pictures to bring Detective Pikachu to the big screen


No sleep 'til Danny DeVito
Jul 21
// Geoff Henao
Can you believe it's been 20 years since Pokemon first told us we gotta catch 'em all? I wouldn't necessarily call the franchise untouchable, but it quickly became one of Nintendo's most profitable and successful tentpoles al...
Pokemon Go movie photo
Pokemon Go movie

Legendary wants to bring Pokemon Go to the big screen


Global domination imminent
Jul 13
// Hubert Vigilla
Pokémon Go (aka the latest plot for global domination by Skynet and The Illuminati) has taken people by storm. Everyone's getting out and walking around to catch 'em all, which has also led to finding dead bodies, gett...
Assassin's Creed movie photo
Assassin's Creed movie

Ubisoft feels Assassin's Creed film is marketing for game's brand, lowers box office expectations


Also marketing for Fassbender's todger
Jul 12
// Hubert Vigilla
The trailer for Assassin's Creed looked promising, what with all the flip-dee-doos and the unexpected Kanye West track. There's solid talent attached to the project as well, with stars Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard ...
Warcraft box office photo
Warcraft box office

Warcraft bombs at the domestic box office but is a hit in China


Oh baby, just you shut your mouth
Jun 13
// Hubert Vigilla
Universal may have been right to think that Warcraft was a problem movie. No, not because Duncan Jones made Generic Fantasy Film: The Movie. Depending on how you look at it, Warcraft is either a Universal boondoggle or a...

Review: Warcraft

Jun 08 // Matthew Razak
[embed]220615:42967:0[/embed] WarcraftDirector: Duncan Jones Rated: PG-13Release Date: June 8, 2016  I will say off the bat that I have not been involved in the Warcraft universe in many years, and even then only with the RTS games, but I'm assuming that there's a very in depth, thought out and complicated world in place by now. It may help the film a lot if you know about this world, but coming from an outsider's eyes the world of Warcraft (sorry) feels hollow and cliche. Maybe that's because the game's basis was originally much the same, but however the game's world has evolved the movie can't capture it, and it's commitment to trying to do that may be it's greatest weakness. We open on some impressively done CGI and motion capture orcs as we're introduced to Durotan (Toby Kebell), a chieftain who has reservations about the obviously-evil Gul-dan's plan to use a an evil green magic gate to invade the human world as the orc's world is dying. Evil plan executed, a small team of elite orc warriors, some corrupted by said evil green magic, enter the human world and begin to build a new gate so as to open a path for the rest of the orcs. The humans (and other Alliance creatures) quickly realize they're being attacked and call upon  powerful magic being The Guardian (Ben Foster) to help protect them. Things are amiss, however, and the battle rages on with knight Anduin Lothar (Travis Fimmel), magic guy Llane Wryne and sexy orc hybrid Garona (Paula Patton) taking the lead in orc killing.  The overarching premise is that there are good orcs out there. Durotan attempts to broker a peace with the humans as he realizes that Gul-dan's magic is evil and is what caused the death in the orc home world. It's clear this theme of telling both sides of a war is what Jones really wanted to do with the film, and at points he almost succeeds. There's a very interesting Game of Thrones political fantasy buried deep in Warcraft, but it never gets the chance to see the light of day. Warcraft has a pretty slavish dedication to the look and feel of the games, and that does it no favors. Instead of the awe-inspiring vistas of The Lord of the Rings the overall look of the film feels cheap. Armor and costume design feel like they were pulled out of a high-schooler's math class doodles, which, in fairness, most likely would be influenced by World of Warcraft. Sets are often small and fake looking and overall it just feels very cheap, like we're watching something out of early 00s SyFy. You've seen almost all of this before and done better.  It's especially odd because for the most part the orc stuff is absolutely fantastic. Character design, animation and setting all feel fresh and interesting. The motion capture and CGI technology for the orcs is spot on, though can sometimes hit the uncanny valley really, really hard. When that combines with the plastic-looking human world the entire affair feels like a shell of a fantasy world: empty except for pretty pictures and ideas too big to be executed well. The screenplay is unfortunately unbalanced as well. At points it actually shines, and you can see Jones' skills with handling genre material with a deft touch. The next moment its as clunky as as the massive orcs who are speaking it. Characters and their motivations get picked up and dropped as easily as the plethora of human knights thrown about by orcs. Massive plot points are glazed over and world creation often feels as if it was forgotten. Part of this stems from the film seeming to assume that we all have a basic foundation in Warcraft lore and part of it stems from the fact that sequels are blatantly already in the works. The story starts to stretch thin by the end and the conclusion really stops making much sense. It is far from the worst fantasy story ever put to screen by miles, but it never rings with the emotional power of truly great fantasy film making.  Jones does his best with his direction. It's easy to get into the action as he weaves together some impressive battle sequences, even using some top down aerial shots to reflect Warcraft's RTS roots. He actually does some really cool stuff that makes the film fun to watch even when it's not working as well as it could. It's just another way that glimpses of what the movie could be break out before being buried under the hollowness of it all. Have I used the term hollow enough? Warcraft isn't really a bad movie, it's a hollow one. It's surprisingly well executed visually at times, but there's nothing behind the pretty pictures. Its story is actually intriguing, but it never feels important. Its characters have depth to them, but it's never shown. Its not a mess because there is nothing to spill. The world of Warcraft (sorry, again) is a big, pretty, empty shell. 
Warcraft photo
Not one reference to Leeroy Jenkins
When Warcraft (then World of Warcraft) was first announced with Sam Raimi directing, I thought that was pretty perfect. Raimi has a deft touch for handling things that are slightly absurd. His almost tongue-in-...

Man vs Snake trailer photo
Man vs Snake trailer

Watch the trailer for Man vs Snake, which may be this year's King of Kong


Diabetes of Justice
Jun 06
// Hubert Vigilla
King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters was highly entertaining (even though the filmmakers fudged a lot of the facts). Much of that was thanks to the clash of personalities between Billy Mitchell and Steve Wiebe and the obsessiv...
Fruit Ninja movie photo
Fruit Ninja movie

They're making a Fruit Ninja movie, may God have mercy on us all


All is lost
May 23
// Hubert Vigilla
It was bound to happen. After The Angry Birds Movie came out (and did well at the box office), it would only be a matter of time before other time-waster mobile games were turned into feature films. Enter Fruit Ninja. Yes. Th...
Angry Birds box office photo
Angry Birds box office

The Angry Birds Movie knocks Civil War from top of the box office


This header image will never die
May 23
// Hubert Vigilla
Over the weekend we saw The Angry Birds Movie duke it out with Captain America: Civil War (#TeamBird v #TeamCap). #TeamCap believes in personal freedom and accountability in the face of a system that may b...

Review: The Angry Birds Movie

May 22 // Nick Valdez
[embed]220589:42956:0[/embed] The Angry Birds MovieDirectors: Clay Kaytis and Fergal ReillyRating: PGRelease Date: May 20, 2016  At the center of The Angry Birds Movie is Red (Jason Sudeikis), a bird with an unchecked anger issue because he's been alone his entire life. He's been separated from the rest of the birds in town until he's forced to spend time in anger management which leads him to his future partners in crime Chuck (Josh Gad) and Bomb (Danny McBride). When a ship full of pigs, led by the sneaky Leonard (Bill Hader), pulls up to bird island claiming to be friendly, Red leaves in search of the legendary hero known as Mighty Eagle (Peter Dinklage) for help. After shenanigans from the pigs, it's up to Red, Chuck, and Bomb to find the hero and save the island.  Before getting into the nitty gritty, I want to take some time out to comment on how much work went into Angry Birds. It is honestly refreshing to see decent production and time on what seemed like a total cash-in project (from its inception to its last couple of trailers the film reeked of things other than quality) has . The animation is slick, the bird designs have a simple, easy to manipulate geometry (utilizing both hard angles and softer, cutesy spherical shapes), and the cast handles the material as well as they can. Sudeikis has already proved his capacity to lead a film time and time again, and now he can add voice over work to that list. Red's as charming as he needs to be without the script resorting to the same types of "kooky" dialogue the rest of the characters are subjected to. None of the actors come across as phony, with the weakest performance coming from Hader's Leaonard. Then again, even a weak Hader is better than you'd expect so it's a roundabout positive.  Once you get past the bread, you realize there's not a lot of meat on this chicken sandwich. Trying as hard as the visuals might, The Angry Birds Movie simply can't shake off how generic it is. It may not have the luxury of a videogame narrative to adapt, but that doesn't excuse a lot of its choices. While the freedom of a creating a whole universe brings about some neat little oddities differentiating it from other animated films (like anger management having weight in the plot, for example), the same is true for the opposite end of the spectrum. Quite a few quirks and dialogue choices should have been reconsidered. At one point, Angry Birds crosses the line into full-on annoying territory when Chuck and Bomb degenerate into incessant noise making machines for two minutes just so it can get a reaction from its kid audience.  The Angry Birds Movie is at a constant state of flux. Battling between originality and what's easier to write, the film is always holding itself back. In fact, it even takes a hit whenever it has to reference the videogame series. Like when the series' famous slingshot is introduced, it feels forced in. But in that same breath, that very slingshot leads to a well storyboarded climax. So it's an odd toss up between the film's potential audiences. Rather than create a film that's ultimately appealing to the widest demographic possible, you have a film that appeals to folks with select scenes. Some scenes will appeal to the two year olds who like to repeat funny sounds, the three year olds who like gross out humor, the adult who appreciates good animation, or that one parent in my screening who lost his mind the entire time. I'm glad at least that guy had a good time.  I'd hate to end a review with nothing more than an "it could've been worse" sentiment, but honestly that's all I feel about The Angry Birds Movie. It came, it went, it's probably coming back (or at least confident in a sequel enough to promote it during the credits and the extra scene available on mobile phones), and yet it doesn't really deserve any hearty emotions.  The Angry Birds Movie is not terrible enough to earn your rage, but it's not good enough to earn your praise either. A decent outcome from a numerous range of negative potential outcomes earns the film a small victory. 
Angry Birds Review photo
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