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NYPD/LAPD boycotts of Quentin Tarantino reinforce negative stereotypes about cops

Nov 09 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220111:42692:0[/embed] Soon after, the LAPD joined the NYPD in calling for a boycott of Tarantino's films. "Hateful rhetoric dehumanizes police and encourages attacks on us," wrote Los Angeles Police Protective League (PPL) president Craig Lally. "And questioning everything we do threatens public safety by discouraging officers from putting themselves in positions where their legitimate actions could be falsely portrayed as thuggery." There are good cops out there, of course, but none of these statements by the PBA and PPL are going to make it easier for them to do their job. Remarks like these make it sound as if the NYPD and LAPD are beyond reproach. If you've paid attention to the news at all or even have some passing familiarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, that's obviously not the case. The issue is police brutality related to systemic racism and/or general problems with hiring and accountability in law enforcement, but reps for the NYPD and LAPD would rather not address those issues. Because hey, look, Quentin Tarantino! Worse still, police reps recently ratcheted up their rhetoric, and it's still not helping their own cause. Late last week, Jim Pasco, the executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police, made a cryptic statement about Tarantino and the police boycott effort. "Something is in the works, but the element of surprise is the most important element. Something could happen anytime between now and [the premiere of The Hateful Eight]. And a lot of it is going to be driven by Tarantino, who is nothing if not predictable." Pasco added, "The right time and place will come up and we'll try to hurt him in the only way that seems to matter to him, and that's economically." So again, rather than try to figure out how to prevent the deaths of more innocent people, how to reach out to underserved or marginalized communities, and just generally figuring out how to be better police officers, high-level police union reps would rather try to organize a major boycott of a new Quentin Tarantino movie and intimidate the filmmaker, and by extension other voices critical of the police, into silence. This is, frankly, stupid. The NYPD, LAPD, and the Fraternal Order of Police come across as petty and tone deaf. The boycott will accomplish nothing substantive with regard to police brutality; it may simply make current perceptions of the police more negative. At the heart of these statements isn't just a general defensiveness but an unhealthy inability to accept legitimate criticism. We're not talking about the deaths of innocent people or good cops who died doing their job. Instead, police reps have dogpiled on a citizen who was protesting peacefully. In case you were wondering, The Hateful Eight comes out in select cities on Christmas Day.
Police vs. Tarantino photo
Police rhetoric not helping their cause
The NYPD and LAPD really hate Quentin Tarantino right now, labeling him a cop-hater and anti-cop. In the process of explaining their dislike for the filmmaker, the NYPD and LAPD are also providing more reason to lose faith in...

Bans on Star Wars cosplay photo
Bans on Star Wars cosplay

Lightsabers, blasters, masks banned from AMC and Cinemark screenings of Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Jar Jar Binks cosplay also prohibited
Nov 03
// Hubert Vigilla
Star Wars: The Force Awakens is about six weeks away, and a lot of people are getting psyched about seeing the film on opening night. (Though some dumb nerds want to boycott the film. Freakin' nerds.) These sorts of screening...
Deadpool Trailer photo
Motherf**ckers and avocados
We've been anticipating this first bit of footage for some time. After all of the talk, all of the images, all of those years stuck in development, and all of the advertising, Deadpool is actually film that exists. The traile...


Here is everywhere Liam Neeson has killed people

Someone should have died in Nell
Sep 18
// Matthew Razak
Liam Neeson has killed a bunch of people throughout his career, but important questions remained like where and how many. Now those questions are answered thanks to this map the UK publicity company behind A Walk Among the To...

ABC 2 Trailer photo
ABC 2 Trailer

First red band trailer for The ABC's of Death 2

Easy as one two three
Sep 04
// Nick Valdez
The ABCs of Death was a neat experiment in which twenty six different directors took a letter of the alphabet and crafted a horror short. With as frantic of a premise as that naturally some of the segments were more enjoyabl...

Production has begun on the Herschell Gordon Lewis co-directed Herschell Gordon Lewis' Bloodmania

Aug 05 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
Production Begins Today On A New Major Horror Movie Entitled “Herschell Gordon Lewis’ BloodMania”  Monday, August 4th, 2014 - Production begins today on a new major horror movie, entitled “Herschell Gordon Lewis’s BloodMania.” Acclaimed horror genre director Herschell Gordon Lewis will co-direct the project, which is being produced by HGB Entertainment Ltd. for Diabolique Films, the film division of the premiere horror publication, Diabolique Magazine. Mr. Lewis is internationally recognized as the originator of the contemporary splatter film, and he chuckles at being dubbed “The Godfather of Gore." The Producer of the film is Diabolique Films executive James Saito, and the film is being shot in its entirety in Calgary, Alberta Canada. Lewis explained his “co-director” role, an unusual relationship with the production company: “BloodMania is a series of four episodes, each one unique. I’ll personally direct two, and Benjamin Ross Hayden (Agophobia, 2013) and Kevin Littlelight the others. So I can promise a variety of ‘flavors to satisfy even the most ardent horror fans!’” Asked whether “BloodMania” will be a step beyond any film either he or anyone has directed before, the answer was as expected from this maverick director: “What do you think?” A major factor contributing to his reputation in the film industry is Herschell Gordon Lewis’s insistence on never repeating a theme. “BloodMania” he promises, will set a new standard for, as he so eloquently puts it, “off-the-wall outrage, doused in a wild sense of humor!” Producer James Saito has assembled a cast of well-known Canadian actors and actresses, as well as crew highly skilled in special effects. “Enthusiasm is extraordinarily high,” he reports, “and much of that enthusiasm is the happy anticipation that our effects team will have the opportunity to participate in a motion picture whose potential is truly world-class. BloodMania is our gift to Mr. Lewis’ many fans and all fans of the horror genre.” The release of “Herschell Gordon Lewis’s BloodMania” is set for Spring of 2015. Important links: Website: Twitter: @BloodMania Facebook:
H. G. Lewis' new movie photo
By Herschell Gordon Lewis
If you don't know the name Herschell Gordon Lewis, then you have missed an extremely important part of film history. H. G. Lewis' effects are seen in cinemas all over the world even today; his 1963 film Blood Feast was t...

Green Inferno Trailer photo
Green Inferno Trailer

New trailer for The Green Inferno shows lots and lots of promise

Time to rewatch Cannibal Holocaust...
Jun 02
// Alec Kubas-Meyer
I've been anticipating Eli Roth's upcoming cannibal film, The Green Inferno, since it was announced. As a fan (if that's the right word) of the 1980 classic (definitely the wrong word) Cannibal Holocaust, I wanted to see wha...
PG-13 > R photo
PG-13 > R

Study shows PG-13 films are more violent than R films

Gunny McGunnersons over here.
Nov 13
// Nick Valdez
You know what? PG-13 rated flicks get away with quite a bit as long as they refrain from using "f**k" more than once and show less than 2 naked breasts. You may have noticed the increase in allowable body counts in say...G.I....

New Oldboy trailer comes complete with images

Three-hour Director's Cut already claimed to be better
Nov 07
// Matthew Razak
We have another Oldboy remake trailer here and its not showing us too much new, but it's green band so it has way less blood. While Alec is most likely correct in thinking the film is almost totally pointless I can't he...

Review: Machete Kills

Oct 11 // Nick Valdez
[embed]216615:40773:0[/embed] Machete Kills is the story of Machete (Danny Trejo), an ex-federale who gets roped into a mission into Mexico by United States President Rathcock (Charlie Sheen Carlos Estevez ), as he tries to get over the loss of a loved one by killing lots of bad guys. As Mendez (Demian Bichir) and Voz (Mel Gibson) threaten both the United States and Mexico with a fleet of nuclear warheads, Machete has to put aside himself and fight for justice.  As you can most likely tell from the summary (and by the first few minutes of the film itself), this film is not meant to be taken seriously. But at the same time, a lot of effort put into the film can be mistakenly brushed off to the side as "exploitative schlock." It's important to decide on the kind of film Machete Kills wants to be. Is Machete Kills an intentional Grade B Movie or an unintentional one? The difference between the two is that when a film is intentionally trying to be as goofy and Grade B as possible, there is a greater potential to fall flat on its face as neither its humor or seriousness hits the mark. Thankfully, that isn't a problem here. Machete Kills joyously shreds through convention and becomes a wonderful parody of exploitation and send-up to fans of Robert Rodriguez's line of films. Robert Rodriguez has mastered the art of goofy grit. Through his years of experience in the "Mexploitation" genre, he's found the perfect balance of violence and hilarity. Think using an intestine to rappel through a hospital window was the best kill you'd see in the Machete series? Machete Kills upps that ante tenfold. There're helicopters, boat motors, space rifles, and even triple bladed, electrified machetes. If none of that sounds interesting to you in any way, you're not going to like this movie. In fact, that's Machete Kills's main problem. It carves such a niche for itself, it's nearly impossible to reach in from the outside (especially if you're a woman). At times Machete Kills has so much going on, its convoluted story struggles to make sense. Sure you can write off its story problems or bad dialogue as part of its intentional Grade B charm, but unfortunately so much of the film is spent setting up a sequel that may never happen or ogling women's breasts (In retrospect, Machete Kills will be far better as a Grade B film if Machete Kills Space never comes to be), it tends to forget to explain what's going on at any moment.  While the story can get confusing and goes on about 20 minutes too long, thankfully everyone involved with the film knows exactly what kind of film they're in. Amber Heard (as Miss San Antonio) and Demian Bichir (as Mendez) deliciously chew through the scenery and own their personas. Bichir's Mendez wields multiple personalities and is the main reason the rough second act (where Machete has to take Mendez to America for reasons I won't spoil here) is bearable. Heard's Miss San Antonio is deadly sexy and has some of the best lines (and Planet Terror paralleled sequences) in the entire film. Sofia Vergara gets some points as well as she uses her horribly sexist caricature to its full potential, elevating her terrible, terrible lines. Honestly, her character wouldn't have worked ("man-eating dominatrix") if it were anyone else.  As for Danny Trejo? Unfortunately, he still can't anchor a movie. He's certainly gotten better in the past few years thanks to starring in whatever Grade B or C film that offered him money, but there's only so much a stone faced man could do when confronted by folks who can actually act. It's a big strike against the exploitation genre when you're boring big hero is upstaged by the villains.  Speaking of villains, Mel Gibson is such an excellent exploitative villain (and a cut above Steven Seagal's goofiness from Machete) I'm sad he hasn't been used this way before. He just gels into the role and becomes such a wonderfully despicable, yet humorous person who loves Star Wars. Every other cast member in the film brings their B-game to the script and Kills's use of stunt casting will certainly get both laughs and eyebrow raises (there's one cast member who wasn't spoiled through the advertising that's just wonderful in her bit part). Don't like how Sofia Vergara or Lady Gaga acts? Don't like Alexa Vega's gratuitous outfit? Don't worry, they'll be gone after a few minutes. It's a brilliant use of their famous names.  All in all, Machete Kills certainly kills it. Sure it's not all gummi bears and rainbows (rougher than rough plot, overbearing sexualization of women and cleavage despite its attempts at strong female characters, intentionally bad dialogue falls flat a lot of the time), but Machete Kills somehow holds it together and manages to accomplish quite a bit for what it is. A sequel to a movie branched off of a joke trailer.  If you enjoyed the first Machete, if you've ever enjoyed anything made by Robert Rodriguez (and love the idea of a Sex Machine shout out), and if you understand what kind of film it is trying to be, you're going to have so much fun with Machete Kills. For everyone else, maybe a rental. 
Machete Kills Review photo
Bigger budget, bigger kills...bigger boobs.
It's a miracle Machete Kills even exists. It's a sequel to a film originally based on a joke trailer before Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino's Grindhouse. With that in mind, it was easy to forgive potential flaws i...

Review: A Touch of Sin

Oct 03 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]216431:40743:0[/embed] A Touch of Sin (Tian Zhu Ding | 天注定)Director: Jia ZhangkeRating: NRCountry: ChinaRelease Date:  October 4th, 2013 (New York); October 11th, 2013 (LA) In retrospect, the wuxia allusions are pretty apparent. The protagonists of the four vignettes are struggling against larger forces and they carry themselves like the chivalric heroes of old. Three of them, at least, strike poses or achieve gaits that put me in mind of wandering swordsmen. The irony is their social position (these are all everyday working class people elevated to the level of martial folk hero), the kind of violence that occurs (there's no spiritual or philosophical sense of refinement as there would be to the martial arts, this is simply violence as a desperate lashing out), and the emptiness of the violence they enact (there's a sense that nothing will come of the violence). The references begin in the opening scene following a striking image of an overturned tomato truck. A man on a scooter drives an empty freeway -- a massive extension under construction is visible in the distance -- and is accosted by teenage bandits wielding hatchets. Axe-wielding baddies have appeared in plenty of kung fu films from Chang Cheh's Boxer from Shantung to Stephen Chow's Kung Fu Hustle. He dispatches of them quickly and then rides on. There's nothing glorious about what just happened as there would be in a wuxia film, it's just violence, and he continues on his way. In the opening vignette, we watch a worker played by Jiang Wu struggle with political corruption at a local level. Next we get acquainted with the man on the scooter (Wang Baoqiang) who took out the teens with hatchets. Then comes a woman who works in a sauna (Tao) who's pushed to extremes partly because of an affair. The last vignette involves a young man (first-time actor Luo Lanshan) trying to make it in different demoralizing workplaces. Even before knowing these were all based on true stories, I could recognize the non-fiction elements in the final vignette. Part of it centers around an electronics factory/worker dorm not unlike Foxconn; the other portion of that vignette centers on a brothel where teenage girls give themselves to businessmen. It's difficult not to notice the sharp bitterness in the connection. I sensed a few sources of tension throughout A Touch of Sin that underline these ironies and allusions. The violence is so brutal and so ugly, and yet most of the film is based on these artfully paced characters studies with delicate, emotional moments within them. The film is also so beautifully shot, with several images that keep cycling back through my head even days after I've seen the movie. A Touch of Sin is the kind of film where you watch a man's jaw get blown off with a shotgun in graphic detail, but you also experience the quiet desperation of the man who pulled the trigger. There's also a scene where the silent, awkward reticence as a man reunites with his family implies so much about the entire nature of their relationship. All of this is against the backdrop of modern China, rapidly changing, always leaving people behind, the country in the process of trying to catch up to its own ambitions as an economic super power. One of the most memorable images that highlights the differences between the haves and have-nots involves a New Year's fireworks display. Across the water where skyscrapers light up the night, the skies are illuminated by a lush pyrotechnics display. In a lowland, working-class area opposite the skyscrapers, a father amuses his son with the closest available equivalent: he fires his pistol into the air. Since the point of view of the film is that of the working class, I couldn't help but read an us vs. them moment in this act, which wasn't just to make the man's kid happy but to punctuate a kind of thesis statement for the violence in the film: Them, they have industry and so many other tools to degrade and to dehumanize; us, all we have left is violence. But violence is a limited kind of power given how it's manifested in the film. I mentioned above that it seems like nothing can come of violence in and of itself, and it may have something to do with the way these vignettes end. There may be a sense of narrative closure, but not a sense of closure when it comes to affecting actual change. What happens after an act of murder to feed a family other than a cycle of murder out of necessity? Or say political violence when it's just one man and his gun? Violence may not be the answer, but it's the only option. In A Touch of Sin, and by extension China itself, violence is the manifestation of a larger social frustration, the voice of the alienated oppressed cast into steel, the only means of making a statement even when the statement will be negated and the speaker silenced once the authorities come into play. So if not violence, what is the answer to all these social woes? This is the frustrating thing about art as social criticism. It can offer a mirror and hint at possibilities, but there's no requirement to propose actual, workable solutions. But maybe that's the proper way to go about it since any simple proclamations on how to solve the ills of a quickly developing nation would be insulting and naive. Jia offers an interesting closing note for A Touch of Sin, suggesting that these stories are not just ripped from the headlines but are touchstones to the concerns of older tales. And these older tales are a reflection of history which itself cycles into the concerns of modern people. There's an interrelation between different narratives, mirrors down a hall, all points to reconsider what's gone before and what's to come. Maybe there's a leveling principle at work in art, not just art that's also a form of social criticism, or at least a space of sympathy and understanding. Maybe underlying all these acts of human degradation and woe there's a whispered acknowledgement: "There but for the grace of the global economy go I." A Touch of Sin opens in China next month. Somehow the film made it past cultural censors mostly intact despite its harsh, despairing criticism of modern Mainland  China. I'm curious about how it will be received, and also what, if anything, the viewers will be able to do with what they're shown. Like the freeway and the airport being built in the film, the future is uncertain and a work in progress.
A Touch of Sin Review photo
A collage of real-life violence across Mainland China
It's remarkable what a little context can do. My initial impressions about A Touch of Sin were generally positive but also ambivalent. I wasn't sure of what to make of the four loosely connected vignettes, each a mix of right...


About a year ago I reviewed the documentary Ultimate Christian Wrestling and did an interview with directors Jae-Ho Chang and Tara Autovino. The film explored a group of people who merged independent wrestling and Christianit...

Review: Only God Forgives

Jul 18 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]216068:40444:0[/embed] Only God ForgivesDirector: Nicolas Winding RefnRating: RRelease Date: July 19th, 2013 (limited, VOD) Only God Forgives is such a different animal from Drive. Refn's latest is an excruciatingly mannered art house exercise in style. There's no weight to anything that happens -- not the sex, not the violence, not the over-the-top offensiveness of Kristen Scott Thomas's character -- since there's no substance to the events. It's a work of accidental self-parody in line with Terrence Malick's To the Wonder and Brian De Palma's Passion. The movie is a series of ellipses followed by punctuation. It sort of makes sense, though. Here are some of my favorite lines from Ryan Gosling's character in the film: "..." "..." [nostrils flare ever so slightly] "..." "...(?)" "TAKE OFF THE DRESS!!!" "...(!)" "(...)" "...You wanna fight?" Actually, Only God Forgives is not an animal. Like Gosling's quiet-type, Refn's film is more like a robot or a machine. It's cold, empty, lacking in humanity, but undeniably well-designed in order to achieve its purpose, which was, as far as I could tell, merely to be well-designed. A drug dealer named Julian (Gosling) runs some kind of kickboxing school/gym in Bangkok. His brother Billy (Tom Burke) rapes and murders an underaged girl. Billy is murdered, and a cop played by Vithaya Pansringarm has something to do with his death. Julian and Billy's mother (the psychotic evil twin of Kristin Scott Thomas) comes into town seeking revenge on the "yellow n**ger" who's responsible. Everything she says is about as absurdly offensive as that, which makes almost everything she says play out like a farce on the ugliest ideas of ugly Americans. Throughout the film, Gosling looks like he's in a daze, barely emoting but always looking good barely doing it. In Drive there at least seemed to be thought behind those eyes. Here, you get the same expression from Gosling from beginning to end. You'd get a comparable expression from your pet cat if you showed it last year's tax return. In one scene a gorgeous prostitute named Mai (Yayaying Rhatha Phongam) presents her crotch to Julian and then masturbates in front of him while he's tied to a chair just a few feet away. Julian looks like he's watching a tea kettle on the stove. When he later paws Mai through hanging love beads in the corner of a room, he looks like he's glancing blankly out the window on an overcast day. When he's at dinner with Mai and his own mother and his mom calls Mai a "cum receptacle" (or something along those lines), Gosling looks like he's watching paint dry. The stoic posturing became so annoying that I wanted to yell at the screen, "Just friggin' say something already, you dumb jerk!" And yes, I understand the characters are empty because they're really symbols for revenge, righteousness, indecision, and other thematic stuff. And yes I understand the critique of revenge as something hollow. And sure, the cop is doling out warped vigilante justice to lowlifes which suggests a different and almost noble dimension to his brand of violence. And yeah, I noticed the portentous dog with a bum leg hobbling around in that one shot. And sure the passivity of the Gosling character reframes the idea of what sort of revenge film this is. And of course I get the subversion of unpleasantness by shooting it so well. And yeah, I totally see the Oedipal stuff between Gosling and Thomas because the movie is so blunt about it -- it reeks of Freud like Hoboken reeks of Axe Body Spray on a Friday night. But getting it is not the same as liking what I got. These are all interesting ideas and they might work for some people, but for me interesting ideas and style cannot sustain a movie alone. Sometimes sure, but I want a sense of weight of some kind that goes beyond the merely aesthetic and intellectual -- some marrow in the bones, some heart in that chest. Instead we get zonked-out Gosling looking dreamy while Thomas drops vulgarities like prepositions. But the film's biggest sin, like Beyond the Black Rainbow, is that it's just plain boring in stretches. Live by vapid style, die by vapid style. To the film's credit, vapid imagery has never looked so good. Neither has gratuitous violence. Limbs get hacked off, torsos get split open, there's a torture porn scene, there's a blood-drenched room, and it all looks splendid. Refn and cinematographer Larry Smith seem incapable of creating bad visuals, and I admire the deep shadows and the stark Dario Argento monochrome in the hallway shots even though the most interesting thing about those tracking shots is the wallpaper. (To be fair, it is very nice wallpaper.) Makeup artists Vitch Chavasit and Pattera Puttisuraset know their way around stylish viscera. If only the mayhem actually meant something. The film ends on an odd and abrupt note followed by a dedication to cult filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky (El Topo, Santa Sangre). Refn is a major fan of Jodorowsky's, and for his next project he wants to adapt The Incal, a brilliant science fiction comic that Jodorowsky did with Moebius throughout the 1980s. I can't want to see what Refn does with that material, and I hope the movie happens. Yet his invocation of Jodorowsky made me realize what differentiates the fascinating violence of a Jodorowsky movie from the banal violence of Only God Forgives. Jodorowsky declared "I LOVE VIOLENCE!" during an episode of Jonathan Ross Presents for One Week Only in 1991. Blood can be anything in a Jodorowsky movie -- grapes, blue paint, birds, smoke, paper, whatever's handy. It's all operating on a metaphorical level because everything Jodorwosky does is about acts of alchemy. We're base material, here's art turning us into something different -- horror into Guernica. "A child comes into the world covered in blood -- that is violent," Jodorowsky said in a 2000 radio interview with CFRB in Toronto. Violence is creative, and it's a force of life. It's an idea that goes all the way back to his early obsessions with convulsive art and the panic movement. The violence is just violence in Only God Forgives, no matter how aestheticized. It's generally non-transformative (unless you count broken noses as transformative) since there's little change in the characters (aside from becoming amputees or corpses) or in the movie's tone or approach to violence. Here is violence that seems merely tautological: A = A. It's not even like that tautology towards the end of Gravity's Rainbow: "The knife cuts through the apple like a knife cutting an apple." With that line in the novel, there's an odd, unveiled moment of truth. Hundreds and hundreds of pages of dense metaphor, and suddenly revelation. Hallelujah! In Only God Forgives, the man gets sharp things stabbed through his forearms like a man getting sharp things stabbed through his forearms. It's about as profound as it sounds.
Only God Forgives Review photo
What shall we do with all this useless, violent beauty?
Anyone who goes into Only God Forgives expecting Drive 2: Bangkok Drift is going to be disappointed. Drive was the unlikely combination of Nicolas Winding Refn's aestheticized violence and the fuzzy feeling of John Hughes. On...


International Trailer: Only God Forgives

"One night in Bangkok makes a hard man humble"
Apr 18
// Thor Latham
As the Cannes Film Festival draws ever nearer, so too does the premiere of Nicolas Winding Refn's Only God Forgives. A seedy and sordid revenge tale set in Thailand, these two new international trailers offer a few more deta...

Trailer: Only God Forgives (Red Band)

"Wanna fight?"
Apr 04
// Thor Latham
We finally have an honest to goodness trailer for Nicolas Winding-Refn's Only God Forgives. It's the first U.S. trailer I've seen, and I am about as excited as I am capable of being for this film. That is to say, I want to s...

New Kick-Ass 2 pictures show off Hit-Girl, Jim Carrey

Thankfully, nary a jetpack to be found
Jan 28
// Sean Walsh
I loved the original Kick-Ass comic. It was classic Mark Millar, the John Romita, Junior art fit the content wonderfully, and it had a little girl that cut dudes to ribbons. The sequel was considerably darker, as it shou...

Trailer: The Iceman

If you can't guess it, he is not a nice man
Jan 16
// Thor Latham
Here we have the second official trailer for The Iceman, starring Michael Shannon as the notorious contract killer. For over twenty years Richard Kuklinski, aka The Iceman, murdered one hundred people as his means of making ...

Trailer: John Dies at the End (Red Band)

Dec 19
// Thor Latham
I had some former knowledge of the book John Dies at the End by David Wong, and I knew that it was essentially batsh*t insane, but this is the first trailer I've seen for the film adaptation, and woo boy is it ever wack...

Trailer: American Mary

Brutal body modification pays the bills
Dec 07
// Thor Latham
Though the movie already premiered at Frightfest, American Mary will be getting a limited theatrical release in the UK right before it's released to home video on January 21st. Empire has an exclusive trailer to share i...

Tom Cruise takes 5 guys at the same time in Jack Reacher

Burgers, fries, and lots of blows to the crotch
Dec 06
// Hubert Vigilla
Jack Reacher starring Tom Cruise is just around the corner, and there's a new clip out to show just how lethal he is. Watch has he takes on five guys at the same time without breaking a sweat. Even though Jack Reacher doesn'...

New international poster for Park Chan-wook's Stoker

So. Excite.
Dec 05
// Thor Latham
It looks like Park Chan-wook's Stoker is now set to show during next year's (January) Sundance Film Festival, and with so little time until it is ingested ravenously by festival goers' eyeballs I guess someone thought it...

Legend of Conan to embrace Schwarzenegger's 'rust'

Dec 04
// Nick Valdez
When news broke of Schwarzenegger's return as Conan for The Legend of Conan in October, Chris Morgan gave us a few hints as to what to expect from the newer, yet older Conan. In speaking with Hero Complex recently, Morgan det...

Making of clip: Killing Them Softly

Ya know, some people say I look Brad Pitt. Just sayin'.
Nov 26
// Thor Latham
My exposure to Andrew Dominik's Killing Them Softly has mostly been limited to a single trailer and Xander's review from a month or so ago. In a nutshell, he didn't like it very much, and his reasoning was sound en...

Poster for Nicolas Winding Refn's Only God Forgives

What did they do to your beautiful face Ryan Gosling!?
Nov 19
// Thor Latham
In what is truly a sacrifice for his art, we have been given a poster for Nicolas Winding Refn's Only God Forgives where Ryan Gosling's beautiful mug has been put through the meat grinder. Yeesh. This unforgivable crime ...

Mortal Kombat movie reboot still koming, gets a budget

Nov 07
// Nick Valdez
Waaaaay back in 2011, Geoff had mentioned that small bit of news that Kevin Tancharoen (the Mortal Kombat: Legacy, failed Hunger Games pitch, and Glee: The 3D Concert Movie guy) was getting the chance to make a fully fleshed ...

International Trailer: Maniac (NSFW)

He used to be such a sweet hobbit
Nov 06
// Thor Latham
Just to reiterate the warning, this trailer is NSFW and I have also been told it spoils some of the film's best scenes by just throwing them right into your face, so if you want to see it with innocent eyes I suggest you mov...

RZA takes on two more film projects

Looks like he's got the bug
Oct 30
// Thor Latham
It looks like The Man with the Iron Fists just wasn't enough to scratch that film making itch for RZA. Looks like he's already lining up his next two movies, and yes I said two. The man must have really enjoyed sitt...

Schwarzenegger to crush his enemies as Conan once more

Expect to hear the lamentations of the women.
Oct 26
// Nick Valdez
Deadline reports that Universal is set to reboot the Conan franchise again with The Legend of Conan and personally I couldn't be happier. You know why? Because Arnold Schwarzenegger is set to once again play the awesome badas...

The chestburster from Prometheus that could have been

Some hot, torso exploding concept art for ya
Oct 23
// Thor Latham
For someone who regularly voices his displeasure for Prometheus, I just can't seem to bring myself to forget about it, especially when I keep discovering all of the ideas that were cut from the final product. N...

Official synopsis for Kick-Ass 2 shared with the world

One could assume that he is all out of bubble gum
Oct 17
// Thor Latham
Though I had never read the comics, I felt that Kick-Ass made a fun movie all on its own without the need of any previous knowledge of the source material, and that is usually a recipe for success when it comes to comic-...

Review: Seven Psychopaths

Oct 12 // Alex Katz
Seven PsychopathsDirector: Martin McDonaghRelease Date: October 12Rating: R The aforementioned Martin, barely working on his Seven Psychopaths script, is surrounded by a coterie of complete whack-jobs. There's best friend Billy (Sam Rockwell) and his soft-spoken partner Hans (Christopher Walken), who scam rich people by kidnapping their dogs, waiting until signs appear offering a reward, then returning the dog and pocketing the cash. That wonderfully American enterpise is squashed when Billy and Hans kidnap Bonny, a Shih Tzu beloved by local completely fuckballs insane gangster Charlie (Woody Harrelson). Charlie, putting it mildly, gets a little angry and cuts a bloody swath towards Billy, Hans, and the hapless Martin, who gets pulled along for the ride under Billy's insistence that it'll help with his screenplay. Oh, and also there's a mysterious man killing gangsters and leaving jack of diamonds playing cards at the scene of his crimes. Tom Waits shows up and tells a bizarre, heart-wrenching story of love, murder, and bunny rabbits. His character has a name, but you're just going to sit there and say, "Holy shit, that's Tom Waits playing Tom Waits," because it's fucking Tom Waits. Yep, this is definitely vintage Martin McDonagh. There'a also a cameo from the Actor's Actor, the Main Man, Harry Dean Motherfucking Stanton.  There aren't enough words in the dictionary to describe how much this ensemble kills it. Each actor brings some of their own personality into each character. Hans, as the non-violent yet intimidating older gent with the potentially violent past is such a Christopher Walken character, though to Walken's credit, he manages to inject so much heart and pathos into this character, who inevitably becomes one of the more tragic figures in the story. Woody Harrelson probably has the most over-the-top role, shifting on a dime from a murderous, cold-blooded rage to breaking down in hysterical tears over the disappearance of his beloved Bonny. Dog owners will probably sympathize more with Charlie for this reason moreso than any of the other characters.  There are a pair of female characters, Martin's girlfriend Kaya (Abbie Cornish) and Charlie's girlfriend Angela (Olga Kurylenko), but they get very little screen time or meaningful dialogue. However, this turns out to be a tool McDonagh is using to comment on action movies and the female role within them. The effect of violence and how we choose to respond to it is one of the key themes of the film, largely personified in the dichotomy between the manic Billy, searching for the giant action finish he dreams this whole situation will end in (which we get to see in hilarious detail), and the pacifistic Martin, who just wants to get out of the crazy mess Billy's gotten them all in. There's a great effort made to subvert your usual action movie cliche moments as well. It's rare that you get a movie that's often so concerned with being cool and stylish and bloody that also manages to put some serious thoughts about what that cool violence implies, even if it's for justified revenge or has some other "redeeming motive." The violence in Seven Psychopaths, like life, is often sudden and never ends well.  As to be expected from a script from Martin McDonagh, the script is rapid-fire clever, and it manages to successfully toe that line between clever, exciting dialogue and the Juno/Aaron Sorkin style "every character is stupidly sharp with words so the characters start to bleed together." The dialogue is razor sharp, an actor's delight, and you can see the cast reveling in the world they're getting to play in. There are certainly some pacing issues approaching the third act, when the film starts to fit in a lot of the resolution to many of the previous thematic elements. There's a lot of cool things being discussed, but it's being discussed by three guys sitting around in the desert. Sharp dialogue or no, the film can only take but so long to take the pace down a notch before it starts to get a little tedious. Seven Psychopaths easily has more heart and soul than your average action movie, thanks to Martin McDonagh's wonderful script and some wonderful performances. It's a perfect evolution that started with In Bruges, and will hopefully lead McDonagh on to even greater things.
You'd have to be a psychopath to hate this cast
Seven Psychopaths, written and directed by In Bruges's Martin McDonagh, features a character named Martin (Colin Farrell) who is a screenwriter working on a script for a film called...Seven Psychopaths. Now, before the i...


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