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Sian Francis Cox
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SXSW Review: Pig Hag

Pig Hag is one of the best, most truthful films I’ve seen this festival. I don't say that flippantly -- there have been astounding documentaries tackling weighty issues -- but this narrative serves to uncover another form of injus...

 
 
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SXSW Review: La Mala Noche

La Mala Noche is an under-the-radar narrative premiering at SXSW this year, and with its heavy subject matter it’s easy to see why it would appeal to a niche audience. It follows the story of a beautiful woman named Dana (Noëll...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Days of the Whale

Set in Medellin, Colombia, Days of the Whale is a story of youthful rebellion and the inevitable consequences of getting in with the wrong crowd against your parents’ advice. Following young graffiti artists Cristina (Laura Tob&oacu...

 
 
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SXSW Review: The River and the Wall

I’ve spoken highly of all the films I’ve been fortunate enough to see over the course of the last five days at SXSW, and The River and the Wall was definitely among them. It has -- repeat, has -- to be seen on the big scre...

 
 
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SXSW Review: For Sama

For Sama is the story of the Syrian uprising and civil war, told through the point of view of Waad al Kateab. Her motivation for making the film is her daughter, Sama — a beautiful wide-eyed girl who has been born at such a tumultuo...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Aleksi

Aleksi made me laugh out loud so many times that I lose count. The directorial debut of Croatian director Barbara Vekaric and was a heartfelt, hilarious story of the dilemma 28-year-old Aleksi (Tihana Lazovic) experiences when she returns t...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Vai

Vai is a portmanteau film telling the stories of eight different women named Vai. Residing in seven different Pacific countries, their name means 'water', and they all have an innate connection to the sea, which accounts for their free sp...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Vision Portraits

Vision Portraits is the rare kind of film that you’ve always hoped to see, heralding back to the earliest use of montage in cinema in the 1920s and evoking a fresh sense of experimental, artistic filmmaking. Director Rodney Evans tr...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Go Back To China

Go Back To China will no doubt received mixed reviews from audiences of different backgrounds, but I’m of the opinion that it was a fantastic film. Part teen movie, semi-autobiographical, it toed the line between demonstrating really ...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Community First, a Home for the Homeless

Community First is a true passion project of director Layton Blaylock. Seeing him involved in the residents’ lives is a powerful thing and reminds me of why we choose to make films: to explore the humanity in the ordinary, and to ex...

 
 
 
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BBC and ITV set to launch 'Netflix rival' BritBox in the UK

I’m not sure whether it's been the case for US readers, but certainly in the UK the news of the expansion of BritBox, a streaming service reportedly set up to rival Netflix, has prompted a collective sharp and uncertain intake of br...

 
 
 
 
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The 2018 Golden Cages: Most Underrated Film

Welcome one and all to Flixist's new end of the year awards program, the Golden Cages! With Hollywood becoming increasingly out of touch with what the people like, we at Flixist have taken it upon ourselves to deliver the fair, balan...

 
 
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Review: Les Miserables, Episode Six (Part 2)

(This review is a continuation of my analysis of Les Miserables, Episode Six, Part 1.) The real turning point of episode six, for me, came about midway through. Although I emphasize that I know and love the plot of Les Mis, I genuinely di...

 
 
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Review: Les Miserables, Episode Six (Part 1)

Readers, for the sixth and final(ish) time, welcome back to my review of BBC’s miniseries, Les Miserables - episode 6, part 1. I have so much to say that we're just going to have to slice this up across two posts...all the more ...

 
 
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Review: Les Miserables, Episode Five

Readers, you are welcomed to the fifth week of Victor Hugo-inspired raving! What's eerily prescient about this episode is the way in which it echoes the ongoing real-life protests by the gilet jaunes, a French grassroots activist group ...

 
 
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Review: Les Miserables, Episode Four

Reflecting so far on the miniseries Les Misérables, it’s been a fantastic ride. Jean Valjean has completely turned his life around from convicted felon to mayor and employer of an entire town; afterwards, he makes amends...

 
 
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Review: Can You Ever Forgive Me?

It’s been thrown around a lot that this would be the defining performance of Melissa McCarthy’s career, and I have to admit that I entirely believe this to be the case. Ironically, even as unrecognizable as she was, her perfor...

 
 
 
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Review: Les Miserables, Episode Three

To say that I was in shock after this week's episode would be a monumental understatement. Aside from the fact that I have been completely awestruck by Dominic West’s performance throughout the first and second episodes, there ha...

 
 
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Review: Capernaum

Capernaum made me think that we’re so privileged in the West: there are so many cultures in the world that haven’t had the safety and security -- on a national, local and personal level -- that many of us have experienced. ...

 
 
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Review: Les Miserables, Episode Two

Welcome back! After last week’s pilot, I’m really glad to say that the BBC adaptation of Les Misérables is soaring. Thanks to the enduring patience of Flixist’s US writers, who have given me free reign to cover wh...

 
 
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The one with Sian's best films of 2018

Undoubtedly there have been a whole host of brilliant films in 2018 - and several completely terrible ones which I wish I could scratch out of my memory forever yet continue to haunt my dreams. I'm looking at you, Wonder Wheel (more li...

 
 
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Review: Les Miserables, Episode One

While I don’t often review individual shows, this is a unique and rare instance where the worlds of film, musical theatre, literature and TV come together in glorious harmony, or at least like competing relatives forced to be civil ...

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Woody headed for a carnival setting in new Toy Story 4 poster

After multiple plot changes and an entire crew reshuffle since Toy Story 4 was first announced - screenwriters Rashida Jones and Will McCormack have walked away, and controversy surrounding John Lasseter booting him out - nobody seems quite...

 
 
 
 
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Watch The LEGO Movie on YouTube for free this Friday

As if the news of the second LEGO Movie couldn’t get any better, YouTube has teamed up with Warner Bros. for a Black Friday publicity move, streaming The LEGO Movie for free this week - for one day only! On the back of yesterday&rsq...

 
 
 
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Review: Widows

A fusion of stark brutality, underhand crimes and complex systems of political and personal power, Widows is far more just than an awards-season thriller, but a sharp and forceful indictment of corruption on every level of society. I...

 
 
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Review: They Shall Not Grow Old

Coinciding with the centenary of the Great War, I think it’s safe to say that this documentary is a once in a lifetime achievement, and Peter Jackson does not disappoint. The result of hundreds of hours of research in conjunction wi...

 
 
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Review: The Great Buster

Why is it so flipping funny to watch a grown man fall over? I don’t know, but Buster Keaton realized this from a young age and basically built his career on pratfalls and slapstick gags. Here he is - again and again - falling flat on ...

 
 
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The Birds is the dumbest horror movie concept ever

Picture this: [INT. 1962, Universal lot, Burbank, CA. Board meeting. Overworked studio execs fumbling paper, looking nervous.] EXEC 1: We’re all dry. We’ve got a big gap next spring, no way of filling it, what the heck are we go...

 
 


About Sian Francis Coxone of us since 2:37 PM on 04.26.2018

Based in the UK, Sian is an editor and regular contributor to Flixist, with bylines at Destructoid, and has worked as managing editor for Film Enthusiast. Her specialism is in early European arthouse cinema, and her tastes vary from silent comedies to Rodgers & Hammerstein musicals and Marvel.
 
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