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Review: Trip of Compassion

I feel incredibly fortunate to have been able to attend a select theatrical screening of the Israeli film Trip of Compassion, both from a psychological point of view and as a critic attempting to make objective sense of the deep humanitaria...

 
 
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Review: Screwball

America’s national pastime was in a tight spot in the late nineties. Coming off a strike during the 1994-95 season, attendance and viewership were low and Major League Baseball was concerned. Then, like a couple of caped avengers swoo...

 
 
 
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SXSW Review: The Gift: The Journey of Johnny Cash

Johnny Cash’s impact on music is undeniable. With his stern voice and lyrics reflecting blue-collar life, Cash found a way to blend folk into country, country into pop, and pop into rock. The man felt as comfortable singing in&nb...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Tread

The 40th president of the United States, Ronald Reagan, a one-time actor of some repute, died on June 5, 2004. Not surprisingly, the event dominated the news cycle for some days afterward. It also cut short a story that out of Granby, ...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Mr. Jimmy

At some point in our lives, we’ve aspired to be our heroes. I can’t tell you how many times while playing backyard baseball I’d turn my hat backward and take a long, swooping swing a la Ken Griffey Jr. But no matter how ma...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Red Dog

Some people’s mothers are made for TV, might be the takeaway from Casey Pinkston and Luke Dick’s docu-dramedy Red Dog. Much like the infamous Twitter feed-turned-books-turned-Shatner-sitcom Shit My Dad Says proved...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Museum Town

There’s a moment when you first see a work of art that you consider the individual behind it: how did they even conceive of this project, let alone execute it? What was their inspiration? What was their thought process, by Jove! Somet...

 
 
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Review: Who Let the Dogs Out

Who Let the Dogs Out is an hour-long documentary, and yet it feels just as powerful as any longer counterpart. Well, powerful isn't the right word. There's nothing powerful about one man's obsessive dive into the history of one-hit-won...

 
 
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SXSW Review: The River and the Wall

I’ve spoken highly of all the films I’ve been fortunate enough to see over the course of the last five days at SXSW, and The River and the Wall was definitely among them. It has -- repeat, has -- to be seen on the big scre...

 
 
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SXSW Review: For Sama

For Sama is the story of the Syrian uprising and civil war, told through the point of view of Waad al Kateab. Her motivation for making the film is her daughter, Sama — a beautiful wide-eyed girl who has been born at such a tumultuo...

 
 
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Review: Woodsrider

Woodsrider, a documentary from Uncork’d Entertainment bills itself as a “season of adventure and self-discovery.” This is true, in so far as I, through the self-discovery of watching have learned to another degree, more or...

 
 
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SXSW Review: I Love You, Now Die

“If I talk about it, it gets better” That’s what Conrad Roy III said about his social anxiety. Speaking to his computer in a self-prescribed therapy session, Roy laid his feelings bare. At the age of 18, he had deep suicid...

 
 
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SXSW Review: The Hottest August

I was in the wrong damn theater. Despite having checked with the SXSW volunteer at the door I was in the wrong theater. The realization hit me the moment they started introducing the film. Dramatic and powerful didn't sound like words you'd...

 
 
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SXSW Review: Salvage

Filmed over the course of nine years in Yellow Knife, Canada, Salvage is a straight forward presentation of a difficult documentary, which is something, considering its runtime is under an hour. Director Amy Elliott was motivated ...

 
 
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The 2018 Golden Cages: Best Documentary

Welcome one and all to Flixist's new end of the year awards program, the Golden Cages! With Hollywood becoming increasingly out of touch with what the people like, we at Flixist have taken it upon ourselves to deliver the fair, balance...

 
 
 
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Review: Capernaum

Capernaum made me think that we’re so privileged in the West: there are so many cultures in the world that haven’t had the safety and security -- on a national, local and personal level -- that many of us have experienced. ...

 
 
 
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The one with Sian's best films of 2018

Undoubtedly there have been a whole host of brilliant films in 2018 - and several completely terrible ones which I wish I could scratch out of my memory forever yet continue to haunt my dreams. I'm looking at you, Wonder Wheel (more li...

 
 
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Review: They Shall Not Grow Old

Coinciding with the centenary of the Great War, I think it’s safe to say that this documentary is a once in a lifetime achievement, and Peter Jackson does not disappoint. The result of hundreds of hours of research in conjunction wi...

 
 
 
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Review: Free Solo

It’s been a great year for climbing films. Where The Dawn Wall left off, with climbing megastars Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgeson free climbing the previously unclimbed route of El Capitan in Yosemite, Free Solo c...

 
 
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Bill Coors: The Will to Live hits theaters in October

"One Man's Historical, 102 Year Journey and a Legacy of Mental Health" The incredible true story of Bill Coors the Coors Brewery titan comes to life in the new documentary, Bill Coors: The Will To Live. After recently celebrating his incre...

 
 
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Review: A Whale of a Tale

If I didn't have a strong view of whales before, I do now. A Whale of a Tale is a documentary feature representing the controversy surrounding Japanese whaling traditions in the small, rural town of Taiji, and it gave me a lot of confl...

 
 
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LeBron James lands new docu-series with Showtime

LeBron James is a generational talent, one that portends heated Twitter debates revolving around The Greatest of All Time. There's no denying his skill and talent, and he's been consistently great since the early stages of his career. Now a...

 
 
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Review: Rock Rubber 45s

“Entrepreneur” only begins to describe the life and career of Robert “Bobbito” Garcia. At 50 years old, he’s experienced stints at jobs that people strive for most of their working lives. His life and work ex...

 
 
 
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Review: Generation Wealth

I watch maybe one documentary a year. Most often the only ones that grip me are explorations of extreme people. Films like Finders Keepers and Shut up Little Man are standouts, showing just how strange and repulsive human behavior can be. T...

 
 
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LeBron James takes on the NCAA in upcoming documentary

One of the world’s biggest athletes just got done carrying his team into the NBA finals for his eighth (8!) straight finals appearance against one of the most dominant teams in the long history of the NBA. With the season at an end, L...

 
 
 
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Amazon inks Jordan Peele for Bobbitt Docuseries

One night in 1993 Lorena Bobbitt's husband came home, raped her, then went to sleep. In the ultimate act of defiant revenge, Lorena grabbed a knife and--while he was still asleep--cut off his manhood. As if that wasn't enough, she got in he...

 
 
 
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SXSW Review: Social Animals

A documentary about teenagers using Instagram is probably not at the top of your must-see films list, even if you yourself are a teenager. Disclaimer: I am not a teenager. However, I do use Instagram. Almost entirely to take pictures of wha...

 
 
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SXSW Review: The Dawn Wall

Before outlining the merits of The Dawn Wall, of which there are many, I urge you to pursue seeing this on the big screen. Yosemite is of in itself an experience more real and immersive than most. Viewing two men attempt to climb its 3,000 ...

 
 
 
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Review: Ramen Heads

When I sat down to watch Ramen Heads, based on the trailer and synopsis, I was anticipating a documentary on a famous ramen chef and his technique and philosophy akin to Jiro Dreams of Sushi. What I got was...half that. It mostly focus...

 
 
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SXSW Review: The World Before Your Feet

In many ways a two-man collaboration between filmmaker Jeremy Workman and subject Matt Green, The World Before Your Feet is an understated documentary that details Green's efforts to walk every street in New York City's five boroughs. ...

 
 




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Reviews   filter by...

Hanna"Unique just means alone"

 

Mary Magdalene"The Passion 0.5"

 

Missing Link"No no, I think I found it all"

 

Hellboy"Oh boy..."

 

Ploey"A parent-child team review!"

 

Master Z: Ip Man Legacy"AKA: How to waste Michelle Yeoh"

 

Girls of the Sun"Women taking freedom into their own hands"

 

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote"The impossible dream meets the imperfect reality"

 

Rottentail"10,000 square feet of holiness"

 

The Haunting of Sharon Tate"Haunting for all the wrong reasons"

 

The Wind"A prairie home cacodemon"

 

Pet Sematary"Sometimes remade is better"

 

Peterloo"The sound of silence"

 

Shazam!"Say my name"

 

Trip of Compassion"Everything you know about PTSD, rewritten"

 

Dogman"Kindness can only get you so far"

 

Screwball"A swing for the fences results in a groundout "

 

Ramen Shop"Passes inspection"

 

The Beach Bum""Ain't that far down if we don't look, right?""

 

Dumbo"Guess how I'm feeling? Dumbo."

 

The Hummingbird Project"Nothing more exciting than laying cable"

 

Arrested Development - Season Five Part Two"They've Made a Huge Mistake"

 

Us"Turns out, the real monsters were us all along"

 

Relaxer"Sit back and relax (and also probably vomit a bunch)"

 

SXSW The Gift: The Journey of Johnny Cash"What is a man if he doesn't have a spirit"

 
 
 
 
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