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NYFF Review: Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Midway through Céline Sciamma’s masterful Portrait of a Lady on Fire, we get the film’s thematic archstone. So much of this painterly, poetic queer romance is about looking at someone we desire and the feeling of being se...

 
 
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Review: Trick

Trick bills itself as a new breed of slasher film--which, to be fair, is how most new slasher films bill themselves--and that's apparent from the offset. Sure, this is a movie about a masked teenager who goes on a killing spree on Halloween...

 
 
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Review: Metallica: S&M²

Metallica may not have invented the genre of heavy metal, but they certainly popularized it. Blasting onto the scene in the early 80s, the Los Angeles based foursome became legendary in the underground circuit for their bleeding fast riffs,...

 
 
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LFF Review: Harriet

It’s remarkable that the feats of Harriet Tubman, former slave-turned-civil-rights-activist, is a story that’s not been told in film before. A woman who became an abolitionist in the lead up to the American Civil War in 1861...

 
 
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Review: El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie

Ever since the completion of Breaking Bad, there's been a persistent rumor that a follow-up movie was in the works. I'm a purist, I don't see the need to return to a well once it has been perfectly tapped. After a nearly perfect run of five...

 
 
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Review: Gemini Man

It may be time to put the phrase "visionary mind" in moratorium from film trailers. The latest Will Smith vehicle is Gemini Man, and its marketing suggest that it's one of those films that just could not be made without recent advancements ...

 
 
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LFF Review: The Aeronauts

Spend any amount of time in the UK and you’ll soon realise that weather is a favourite topic of conversation for Brits. So, in a year that’s been full of veritable storms, heatwaves, and hurricanes, it’s only fitting tha...

 
 
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NYFF Review: Saturday Fiction

World War II and its surrounding years have seen all sorts of filmic representation on the big screen, from blood-and-guts, boots-on-the-ground soldiering to the devastation of Nazi genocide. The most traumatic event in 20th century Western...

 
 
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Review: The Addams Family

They're cree-py and they're koo-ky, mysterious and spoo-ky, they have a brand new mov-ie, the Ad-dams Fa-mi-ly; An an-im-at-ed fea-ture, so gather to a seat-yer, gonna-wan-na be-here, The Ad-dams Fa-mi-ly.

 
 
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Review: Parasite

It’s a quiet night in the Park household. The Parks have gone away for their son’s birthday, leaving only their housekeeper, Chung-sook (Jang Hye-jin), to tend to the house and their pets while they are away. On the surface, it&...

 
 
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Review: Lucky Day

Following the emergence of Quentin Tarantino in the early '90s, audiences the world-round were at least tantalized by the fan-to-filmmaker's cocktail of pop culturally-savvy criminals and explosive violence. The Tarantino brand would evolve...

 
 
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LFF Review: Knives Out

It’s taken time to properly piece together my thoughts on Knives Out. It’s the sort of film that, because it’s been so carefully thought out, lends itself to equally careful consideration. Moulded unmistakably on Agath...

 
 
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LFF Review: Bad Education

Whether or not you’re familiar with all the details of the $11.2 million public school embezzlement scandal in New York in the early 00s, you soon will be after Cory Finley takes to the screen again this festival season. Compari...

 
 
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NYFF Review: The Whistlers

For as copious and dime-a-dozen film noir crime stories were at a time, and how prolific their influence has remained over the decades, there's always the odd film that comes along that puts its own little spin on the formula. The tropes ar...

 
 
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LFF Review: Marriage Story

Charlie (Adam Driver) and Nicole (Scarlett Johansson) run a theatre company together in New York. Charlie directs, Nicole acts, they’re married, and they have a son. All has been well for years, but somehow it isn't enough for Nic...

 
 
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LFF Review: The Report

An indictment of bureaucracy at an acute level, The Report is the recipient of a lot of buzz online, largely owing to its high-profile cast and imminent Netflix release. Featuring Annette Bening (in a successful run, she’s alread...

 
 
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Review: Preacher (Season 4)

After four years of boundary-pushing entertainment, Preacher has finally reached its end. As one of the forerunners for AMC's "cutting edge" label of programming, Preacher prided itself on how it didn't play by conventions. If it was a soci...

 
 
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LFF Review: The King

The King is, in a word, severe. Formidably darker than Henry V adaptations in the past, it centres on a troubled Hal (Timothée Chalamet) who reluctantly takes on the mantle of kingship from a manipulative father (Ben Mendelsohn), f...

 
 
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LFF Review: Jojo Rabbit

During the opening sequence of Jojo Rabbit, Britpop plays over a montage of Nazi paraphernalia and propaganda. Archive footage shows Hitler reaching down from a podium to girls screaming to be with him, probably crying to have his babie...

 
 
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LFF Review: Hope Gap

With a week to go before their 29th wedding anniversary, Edward (Bill Nighy) decides not to take his wife Grace (Annette Bening) out for dinner. Instead, he packs a bag and tells her he wants a divorce. Their comfy family life near Hope...

 
 
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LFF Review: The Personal History of David Copperfield

If anyone can tease out the devilish humour and absurdity from Dickens, it’s Iannucci. The creative force behind satires like The Thick of It and The Death of Stalin is so well-matched to the material, in fact, that it’s a won...

 
 
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LFF Review: Lucky Grandma

A mobster flick that puts an elderly Chinese woman into a gang war in New York, Lucky Grandma was a bit of light fun to open LFF this year. Following the story of Grandma/Nai Nai (the energetic and cunning Tsai Chin), the story finds...

 
 
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LFF Review: Waves

The word synaesthesia refers to a trait in which a person experiences merged senses simultaneously -- such as hearing colours or seeing sound. It’s the only word I can use to touch on the intensity of the visual and aural experienc...

 
 
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Review: First Love

When history's overtaken all of us, I think Takashi Miike's will be a name left standing. For one thing, the Japanese genre-master is capital-P prolific. 2017's Blade of the Immortal was touted as his 100th feature film, and since then he's...

 
 
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Review: The Spy

The Spy puts Sach Baron Cohen in a darkly gripping, real-life tale of espionage, following the life of Egyptian-born Eli Cohen. The story traces his infiltration into the highest ranks of the Syrian government in the early 1960s, providin...

 
 
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Review: Joker

There's been a lot of debate about Joker since its wild success on the festival circuit over its portrayal of a troubled, lonely, white male becoming the violent mouth piece for a social uprising. Then there's been a lot of discus...

 
 
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NYFF Review: The Irishman

The Irishman feels like it could be Martin Scorsese’s final film. It won’t be—he’s already working with Leonardo Di Caprio on Killers of the Flower Moon—and yet if you told me this was his last movie, I’d...

 
 
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Review: Killer Sofa

Let's get this controversy out of the way right now: The piece of demonic furniture in Killer Sofa is (big gasp)... not actually a sofa. It's a recliner. It's a chair. As Oxford describes it, a sofa is "a long upholstered seat with a back a...

 
 
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Review: Teen Titans Go! vs. Teen Titans

Tangent time! One of my favorite episodes from The Simpsons has to be the second Treehouse of Horror special that aired back in the show's third season. I thought that the various segments all had some horrific charm to them, the framing de...

 
 
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Review: Ad Astra

Space is increasingly becoming less of the final frontier, and more so just another spectacle us mere mortals have grown accustomed to, don't you think? Me, the idea of interstellar travel still blows my mind, but James Gray's Ad Astra give...

 
 
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Review: Koko-di Koko-da

A married couple attempts a camping trip, the first vacation they've had since an outing to celebrate their daughter's birthday. There is no child, now. They're alone, despondent, and aggravated as they twist through backroads before stoppi...

 
 
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Review: Rambo: Last Blood

I believe I would be hard pressed to find someone who disagrees with me that John Rambo is a character of a certain time. What started as a great look at the horrors that lingered in soldiers returning from Vietnam quickly turned into a mac...

 
 
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Review: Loro

Paolo Sorrentino seems most comfortable around the wealthy. Since Il Divo, one of the Italian art filmmaker's now-11 year old features, his films have doted in and out of the wealthiest of circles. In that film we were swept away by the cor...

 
 
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Review: Hustlers

Contemporary films owe a lot to Goodfellas, don't they? Ray Liotta's Henry Hill, narrating his extralegal escapades with hindsight and a deadpan drawl, has become an iconic method of storytelling. This isn't even to mention Scorsese's wild ...

 
 
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Review: The Goldfinch

John Crowley's adaptation of The Goldfinch was almost destined to come up short no matter how you slice it. Donna Tartt's 2013 critical-darling of a novel would top book lists and sweep awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Tart...

 
 
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Review: Promare

Sometimes you want to watch a dark horror where a creature of unspeakable terror stalks its prey in the middle of the night. Sometimes you want to watch a couple fall in love and survive against all adversity. Sometimes you want to watch a ...

 
 
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Review: One Cut of the Dead

One of my favorite things about low-budget filmmaking is that when you see the strings, when you feel the quirks and inconsistencies that haven't been edited, re-shot, or focus-grouped away you get to see the people within the movie. You se...

 
 
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Review: IT Chapter Two

It's not every day that you're able to witness a successful remake of a classic property, but 2017's IT was easily better than the original TV miniseries that wormed its way into the hearts of millions in the 90’s. Unlike that miniser...

 
 
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Review: Satanic Panic

Most horror films try to spread the idea that your average devil worshiper is some basement-dwelling white dude who lives off-the-grid, has no income of his own, and is repellent to anyone with half a brain unfortunate enough to land anywhe...

 
 
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Review: The Peanut Butter Falcon

It feels like movies have been veering into darker and darker territory for a while now. James Bond is gritty, no-nonsense, and exceptionally brutal. The DCEU has pushed towards darker material before finding that a more balanced touch, or ...

 
 




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Reviews   filter by...

Trick"Give me something good to stab (and stab and stab)"

 

Metallica: S&M²"Fight Fire With Fire"

 

LFF Harriet"Be free or die"

 

Gemini Man"Does whatever a gemini can"

 

LFF The Aeronauts"Reach for the sky"

 

NYFF Saturday Fiction"Life during wartime"

 

The Addams Family"Just be yourself (but not too much!)"

 

Parasite"Class mobility is a lie"

 

Lucky Day"Luck's run out"

 

LFF Knives Out"Whodounut"

 

LFF Bad Education"Ain't misbehavin"

 

NYFF The Whistlers"Whistling away the jail days"

 

LFF Marriage Story"Romcom in reverse"

 

LFF The Report"Democracy under scrutiny"

 

Preacher (Season 4)"The Messiah will dance!"

 

LFF The King"High drama"

 

LFF Jojo Rabbit"Ja Hitler!"

 

LFF Hope Gap"Deficient"

 

LFF Lucky Grandma"You'll never look at your grandma in the same way again"

 

LFF Waves"Ripple effect"

 

First Love"Tough love"

 

The Spy"What would you do for your country?"

 
 
 
 
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