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IMAX to back away from 3D movies


More like 3Sucks, right?
Jul 27
// Matthew Razak
I'm not a 3D movie hater. I think in the right hands 3D can make an incredibly movie. In fact I know it can. The sad thing is that directors don't usually film for 3D. They just shoot a 2D movie with 3D cameras. There's no us...
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First full trailer for IT makes it really hard to write a story about it without the pronoun it


Thank goodness for italics
Jul 27
// Matthew Razak
IT is finally here. Or the remake of it is finally here. Stephen King's classic horror story already had a TV version that made us all insanely afraid of clowns (or at least Tim Curry dressed up as a clown), but now...
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Darth Vader may appear in the Han Solo movie


*sigh*
Jul 26
// Drew Stuart
You know about the Han Solo movie, right? The one that seemed like a joke at first, until Disney announced the casting. The one that got Chris Miller and Phil Lord to direct, only to fire them at the end of production because...
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James Cameron is looking to launch a new Terminator trilogy


I'll be back... again and again and agia
Jul 26
// Matthew Razak
So the Terminator franchise reboot hasn't gone as planned... either time. Obviously the franchise is still considered a moneymaker for whatever reason, but no one seems to be able to get a successful film out of it anymo...

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Wonder Woman 2 release date confirmed


Electric Boogaloo coming December 2019
Jul 26
// Anthony Marzano
In a sneaky press release on Tuesday evening DC executives confirmed that Wonder Woman 2 is slated for release on December 13th, 2019. They also confirmed what everyone already knew, that Gal Gadot was coming back for the lea...
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Matt Groening's animated comedy Disenchantment greenlit by Netflix


With Blackjack! And Hookers!
Jul 25
// Drew Stuart
Matt Groening, you beautiful bastard. You've given us The Simpsons, Futurama (my favorite cartoon ever) and soon, a new animated comedy called Disenchantment. As of today, Netflix has green-lit 20 episodes of the new Mat...
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Henry Cavill's mustache will need to be digitally removed for Justice League reshoots


Oh, they're also costing a crap ton
Jul 25
// Matthew Razak
Jusitce League came out of SDCC looking pretty rosy all things considered. There was a great new poster and a new trailer, and everyone cheered really loudly. But let's all please remember who we're talking about he...

The Next Bond film is slated for 2019

Jul 25 // Drew Stuart
That leaves the director. Who should needs to direct this film? Well, if you've been paying attention to Matt, you know that Christopher Nolan would be a dream come true, though getting Nolan to sign on for Craig's final film seems easier said than done to both of us. Nolan isn't a director who waits for a film to come to him, and while he's certainly not afraid to helm a franchise (just look at his Batman trilogy,) reserving him for the films would likely take some planning ahead. Still, I've no doubt that whoever directs this next Bond film will be talented, willing and able to deliver an excellent movie.  [via Twitter]
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'Craig' open a cold one with the boys
There's been some confusion lately over the role of James Bond; who will play him, and most of all, when he'll reappear on the silver screen. With things slowly taking shape behind the scenes, us fans have been left most...

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Comic-Con 2017 trailer roundup


TRAILERS! TRAILERS! TRAILERS!
Jul 24
// Anthony Marzano
What a weekend its been, while nothing really overly exciting and brand new was announced at San Diego Comic-Con there was a ton of trailers from previously announced TV and movies. So to cure your Monday blues we at Flixist have compiled all of the trailers that we reported on as well as a few that slipped through the cracks...for you.
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Bodies are starting to pile up in our first peek at Westworld's second season


Doesn't look like anything to me
Jul 24
// Matt Liparota
HBO's Westworld was one of the network's biggest hits of 2016; the sci-fi Western debauchery simulator inspired more theorizing and hot takery than any show since perhaps Game of Thrones. So it's no surprise that the show was...
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A Dwayne Johnson-less Shazam is next planned DCU movie


Rock still cooking up some Black Adam
Jul 24
// Anthony Marzano
In somewhat sad news coming out of San Diego Comic Con we have learned that Shazam's movie will fill the previous gap year of 2019 for the DCU, but it will not have everyone's favorite wrestler turned-actor Dwayne Johnson. No...
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Star Trek: Discovery's SDCC trailer is full of drama


And yet another ship getting destroyed
Jul 24
// Matthew Razak
I really wish that CBS would put out a trailer or something that made me feel confident in exactly what Star Trek: Discovery is. Am I supposed to be watching something from the original Trek universe or not? They say it'...
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Do we really all hate franchises and sequels?


Box office recap
Jul 24
// Matthew Razak
Here's a fun fact: Dunkirk is the first number one opening for a non-franchise movie of the summer. Every other weekend during this summer has been led by a movie that is either a sequel or part of a major franchise...

Review: Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets

Jul 24 // Drew Stuart
Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets is, once boiled down, a sci-fi adventure. The story is set in the 28th century, where humanity has created a gigantic metropolis in space known as Alpha. Over hundreds of years, aliens from all over the galaxy have come there to thrive and prosper, creating a cornucopia of cultures that mingle with each other every day. Alpha is home to everyone, and the heart of Valerian is exploring this strange world with our main characters, the titular Valerian (Dane DeHaan) and his partner Laureline (Cara Delevigne). The problem with Valerian is how they explore it. The plot has our two agents racing against time to stop an ever-expanding radiation zone at Alpha's core, but that sense of urgency is seldom felt in the actual plot. There are chases, sure, but they have no tension. There's a mystery, but if you're paying attention even slightly, you'll know exactly where the story is going after 20 minutes. The driving point of the plot is supposed to be mystery, but it completely deflates once the movie starts rolling. The best aspect of Valerian is the world, and I'm sure that sentiment will be shared amongst anyone who sees this movie, whether they thought it was good or bad. There's a scene early on that depicts the genesis and growth of Alpha, and is one of my favorite intros of 2017. It's humorous and magical, friendly and dazzling. The various creatures and aliens on Alpha are diverse and interesting, taking that nuanced world-building from Star Wars and executing it with style. Yet, that's about all that Valerian seems to get right. Nearly every other aspect is fundamentally flawed, and I wish that were an exaggeration. Take our leading actors for example. Dane DeHaan and Cara Delevigne have both given their worst performances in their careers in Valerian. No, I'm not exaggerating. DeHaan is in no way a believable federal agent, and his gruff mumbling throughout the film makes the whole thing feel like a fan-film. He's painted as a ladies man at the beginning of Valerian and I nearly burst out laughing when Delevigne referred to him as a 'lady killer'. It's like pointing to a turd and calling it Toblerone; good for a laugh, but I'll be damned if you try and get me to swallow it. I just couldn't stomach the blatant wish-fulfillment when the lead is far from being suave or charismatic in the slightest. Delevigne has never actually given a good performance on film before, but in Valerian her acting stands out as particularly cardboard-esque. Seriously, look at any of these images I have in this review and behold the only face she makes on camera. What makes these performances even worse is that Valerian and Laureline are supposed to be attracted to each other, and they seem anything but. Their interactions are stiff and stale, and even the dialogue they share is poorly written. Kids might be able to get behind these characters, but if you have a fully developed brain then you're in for a sore experience. As I mentioned earlier, the plot is also all over the place. It's flimsy and dull, failing to interest the viewer in the central mystery presented likely due to how obvious the outcome is. The film opens by almost completely explaining the events that are 'revealed' later on at the climax of Valerian, and yet pretends like the audience didn't see what happened. This, combined with some clumsy foreshadowing and telegraphing by the villain spell out the plot for the rest of the film, leaving little to enjoy besides the beautifully designed world. And, call me crazy, but Valerian seems to know this, considering that it takes significant breaks from the plot for trivial side-stories. There's a point midway through where the film drops the little momentum it had to rescue Laureline from some bumbling space creatures. This sequence is pretty to look at, and has moments of fun sprinkled here and there, but serves no purpose whatsoever. In the end, this section of the movie only makes it more painful once our heroes return to the story at hand. Look, I don't hate Valerian. It's a beautiful film, with amazing CG and a set-piece or two that are fun on the surface level. The world it's set in is captivating and unique, something that is so rare today in Hollywood. But no movie has ever become great just by looking good; the plot, the dialogue, the characters need to be written well so the films stunning display can create synergy between the narrative and the visuals. This is how a great sci-fi adventure film is made, and it's something that Besson has completely forgotten how to do with Valerian. Visuals are in service to the writing, and Besson put the cart in front of the horse on this one. The image of Alpha floating in space, filled with interesting creatures and civilizations is incredible, but with a couple of boring humans taking up most of the runtime, you'd be better off watching the trailer and moving on.
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Such a well polished turd.
Luc Besson may not be a household name, but ask any fan of film who he is and you’ll be swept into a drawn-out lauding of his movies. Besson directed both The Fifth Element and Leon: The Professional, both of which foun...

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Game of Thrones Season 7 Recap: 'Stormborn'


Please, try not to scream.
Jul 23
// Rick Lash
HBO has been running it's mouth all week about how big its Game of Thrones season 7 premiere was. How big? Well, I'll have to show you? *Unzips notes* 16.1 million viewers watched the premiere, night of, through live outlets ...
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What world am I living in right now?
Justice League is in the middle of a huge mess right now. DC Comics and Warner Bros. are tooling and re-tooling elements, Ben Affleck was almost phased out of the Batman role (before confirming he'd be staying on), and the fi...

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Thor: Ragnarok San Diego Comic-Con trailer is *$#%@!^ awesome


Loki and Thor ... and machineguns!
Jul 22
// Rick Lash
Thor: Ranarok had a tough encore. It's first trailer was the stuff of movie nerd wet dreams and it bowed during the Super Bowl. It's hard to make a better entrance than that. Now disregard everything I just said, as its secon...
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Stranger Things season 2 trailer makes me more excited for Ghostbusters than new Ghostbusters


Cue the male-nerd-nostalgia-rage haters.
Jul 22
// Rick Lash
Now that half the internet is riled up [again], let's take a look at the awesome new Netflix original Stranger Things season 2 trailer, hot off the presses from the San Diego Comic-Con. Holy crap did they kill it with the us...
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The Walking Dead season 8 and Fear the Walking Dead season 3 San Diego Comic Con trailers


8 minutes of Walking Dead trailers!
Jul 22
// Rick Lash
It's been a good day for fans of AMC's The Walking Dead and Fear the Walking Dead. Both series had trailers debut at the San Diego Comic-Con. To s and why, belowe than two standard trailers bundled into one, and it promises a...
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Steven Spielberg's Ready Player One trailer drops at San Diego Comic Con


Gunters got game.
Jul 22
// Rick Lash
Ready Player One should be taught in schools across America because it's about video games, virtual reality, pop culture, and Americans getting fat asses. You know, reality. But until national and state by state curriculums g...
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Your Bad Movie Night Guide, Vol. 2: Zombeavers


Can we please stop with the beaver jokes
Jul 22
// Rick Lash
Some movies are so bad they're good. Like last week's entry, Shark Attack 3: Megalodon; while it appears that it must have been somewhat selfaware (one would hope), at other times, it clearly took itself plenty seri...
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Inhumans

Marvel's Inhumans San Diego Comic-Con trailer is less than impressive


Almost inhumane
Jul 22
// Nick Valdez
There's a weird air around Marvel's The Inhumans. Maybe it's because it's a formerly scheduled film project that got bumped to TV, the fact that some of it being shot on IMAX cameras makes it seem bigger than it actually is, ...
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Hey Arnold!

Hey Arnold!: The Jungle Movie could finally give me the closure I've always wanted


The Pigeon Man lives!
Jul 22
// Nick Valdez
Our current 90s nostalgia boom has resulted in some good things, and lots of bad things. But I am thankful that it's allowed some stories to finally get a real ending. Hey Arnold! was one of the many Nickelodeon shows cut dow...
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The Defenders

Marvel's The Defenders comes together a little more with its San Diego Comic-Con trailer


Sigourney Weaver, the GOAT
Jul 22
// Nick Valdez
I still haven't seen Marvel's Iron Fist, especially after Editor at Large Hubert Vigilla tore it apart in his review, but I guess I'm going to have to read some cliff notes or something if I want the full Defenders experience...

NYAFF Capsule Review: Mon Mon Mon Monsters

Jul 22 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
[embed]221676:43676:0[/embed] Mon Mon Mon MonstersDirector: Giddens KoRelease Date: TBDCountry: Taiwan
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Something different
Giddens Ko’s You Are the Apple of My Eye remains one of the best films I’ve seen at the New York Asian Film Festival. Café. Waiting. Love, which he wrote but did not direct, is another film I enjoyed immens...

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Spawny Boy

Todd McFarlane to direct new R-rated, lower budget Spawn movie


S to the p to the a to the awn
Jul 22
// Nick Valdez
20 years ago Michael Jai White and John Leguizamo put on some crazy outfits and delivered an even crazier film with Spawn. While Todd MacFarlane's Spawn will never be as popular as it was in 1997, a film version now makes sen...
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WB may be looking to ditch Ben Affleck as Batman... but gracefully


Michael Keaton comeback!
Jul 21
// Matthew Razak
Ben Affleck's Batman has been on a rocky road of life, but after being the only saving grace of Dawn of Justice I thought we'd at least get another four or so movies out of him. However, from the moment Sad Affleck came ...
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Rocko's Modern Life returning for one hour even more modern special


I'd wear Rocko's shirt in a heartbeat
Jul 21
// Matthew Razak
Rocko's Modern Life wasn't my favorite Nicktoon. It came out in the second (or third?) wave of Nicktoons where I was just getting a bit too old and "cool" to watch (until I got older and "cooler" and started watching aga...
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One Piece

One Piece is getting a live-action TV series for some reason


Yo ho ho he took a bite of gum gum
Jul 21
// Nick Valdez
Eiichiro Oda's One Piece is arguably the most popular anime series in Japan, so with how much anime has garnered interest in the West it was only a matter of time before some Western company wanted to try their hands at ...

Review: Dunkirk

Jul 21 // Rick Lash
[embed]221733:43672:0[/embed] DunkirkDirector: Christopher NolanRelease Date: July 21st, 2017Rated: PG-13Format: IMAX 70mm Dunkirk tells an early,  yet historic story from World War II when Allied (then only British and French) forces are being pushed back to the sea centering around the town of Dunkirk. The film opens, effectively, on a group of soldiers walking through abandoned French streets when fliers begin to rain down from above. One of the soldiers grabs one and we're treated to a glance of what they see; that is, a German advertisement encouraging the Allies to surrender with a graphic map detailing how bleak their situation is. It's a somber tone-setter which is quickly augmented by the realities of war as a soldier grabs several out of the air in an attempt to collect it for toilet paper. And then, things get chaotic, and never really slow down. Despite several attempts to void his bowels, this solider, our soldier, Tommy (Fionn Whitehead) never clearly gets to. The act of surviving becomes so all-encompassing that it's to the point where his body forgets it needs relief. And that's the point: an experience so immersive that nature's calls go unheeded: literally everything but survival is forgotten. It's no accident that immersion is at the forefront of the piece. The action is tightly wrought, like floss wrapped round your fingers too many times: the blood continues to pump, but has no where to go; the flesh turns white; and sensation builds as numbness should set in. Nolan designed the film, from his insistence in shooting film rather than digital, to the carefully orchestrated score by Hans Zimmer (simply amazing), to the avoidance of digital effects and the minimal quantities of dialogue to be immersive. If you were to pass Christopher Nolan on the street today and shout out at him, "Hey Chris! Where should I go see your dope new movie Dunkirk! Dark Knight rules!" He'd probably yell back, "Hey asshole, you don't know me!" Or just pepper-spray you to the face. But if he deemed you with a response, he'd be sure to recommend you take the time to find an IMAX theater showing Dunkirk with a film projector. It's how he intended audiences to see the film. Film is known for feeling more real and alive. And IMAX film formats not only capture more information, but the screen size allows more to be displayed, and using film projectors does this best for the format. Couple this with the use of real, true to life and 'historically accurate' warships, fighter planes, and props (like scale models and stand-ins for large group shots) and you have a movie that pops off the screen like few others. There's a shot from above of three British Royal Airforce fighters flying in wing to wing formation that was one of the crispest, most real feeling moments I've ever seen that I wanted to screen grab live because I knew nothing I could share in a review would do it justice. This is a reference shot, but it's a poor imitation of a cheap knockoff. It's true, not everyone's going to see it in this format--which is unfortunate, but if you're wondering if you can, it turns out Dunkirk's website will help you figure that out. Search here to see if any 70mm showings are near you. If they're within driving distance, I'd consider making the trip: it's that worthwhile. The experience was so immersive that I failed to recognize both Kenneth Branagh and Tom Hardy (in fairness, his face is obscured for most of his screen time). I was actually lauding Nolan for going with relative unknowns entirely. Cillian Murphy does make a cameo (an early Nolan collaborator from Batman Begins), but it felt well-incorporated and didn't jar. The lack of dialog didn't jar either; it served the purpose of letting the action and tension dictate emotional response and immersion. The film's a triptych, with three non-linear sequences taking place on land, air, and water. Yet, despite this, our lead, if you can pick one out, Tommy, doesn't open his mouth to speak until something like 30-40 minutes into the movie, outside of a single word. The dialog is noticeably reduced and it worked so well. There are no grandiose speeches, no overblown discussions on politics or course of action that can bog movie paces down. It's frenetic. From the first time shots are fired, the pace of the movie builds and carries until the finale. This is all done without enemy soldiers ever really appearing on screen, and with the violence and horror of war (which are quite viscerally present) not being exploited for gore or shock value. The reality is one in which every person present accepts that they may very well be killed at any given moment, but they still operate within the rules of their world while best trying to survive. With the pace not waning, these rules are eventually put to the test and war stretches conventions to the point that they break when individuals survive. Yet in spite of that grittiness, the film focuses on sacrifice and the willingness to put oneself at risk for others. These moments pile up throughout the film so that bleakness is balanced with inspiration and grief with triumph. It's a movie about a retreating army, a defeated group (at least for the moment) that achieves victory through survival, with the one most-noted casualty coming from the unlikeliest of sources. War turns conventions, much as Nolan's committed filmmaking does, and in one microcosm within a this microcosm, we're reminded that heroic deaths need not be grandiose, they only need conviction behind them. It's incredibly resonant. In reviewing this film, I find myself hard pressed to compare it to others. It's a standalone. I say this, knowing that Nolan took inspiration from a variety of sources (for inspiration on total settings in war movies to inspiration for pacing and tonal setting in movies in general). And in trying to score it for two separate websites, I only know that it has no real failures: it is a great film, one that just far outstripped it's summer competitors.
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Take a bow, Mr. Nolan, and cue the appla
Christopher Nolan is a well-known name. As modern-day filmmakers go, his name is near the top of the list of directors that studios will trust with boatloads (literally in this case) of money to bring projects to life. Strang...


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