Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around


Television

 photo

Kevin Bacon has worms: Syfy brings back TV Tremors reboot


No, seriously, Bacon has worms.
Jun 27
// Rick Lash
Because Hollywood is essentially a seething heap of worms mindlessly burrowing through recycled soil looking for fresh fodder, we're getting a second Syfy Tremors reboot, but this time with bacon! Kevin Bacon will reprise the...
 photo

New trailer for HBO's Game of Thrones Season 7 satisfies


Winter is here on July 16
Jun 21
// Drew Stuart
It's been roughly a month since the last trailer for HBO's Game of Thrones dropped, but when you're hotly anticipating one of the best shows on TV, that wait can become an agonizing struggle. On top of that, GoT is premiering...
 photo

Continental centric prequel to John Wick planned for TV


Welcome to the possibilities
Jun 21
// Anthony Marzano
In what could only be described as an answer to my prayers, a prequel of sorts to the 2014 breakout hit John Wick is being planned for TV. The kicker? It's all centered around The Continental hotels where no assassin business...
 photo

HBO's Game of Thrones Season 7 has a real trailer, finally


7.16 HBO and I are gonna Netflix & chill
May 25
// Rick Lash
While HBO released a teaser spot for Game of Thrones season 7 two months ago, it was more of a narrative reminder of what's to come based off of existing soundbites. No new footage was revealed. This was a problem for the rab...

Netflixilania photo
Netflixilania

Netflix's Castlevania series looks like an anime


Hopefully good?
May 24
// Nick Valdez
A teaser for the Castlevania adaptation on Netflix has just been posted on Netflix Latin America's Twitter. Watch it before it's gone! Okay, there's not enough here to actually criticize. As for the visuals, I'm fine with it. Besides, it's written by Warren Ellis. I'm sure it'll be fine. 

Review: Baywatch

May 24 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221553:43568:0[/embed] BaywatchDirector: Seth GordonRelease Date: May 26, 2017Rated: R Mitch (Dwayne Johnson) is a lifeguard everyone loves. He may take his job a bit too seriously, but in the world of Baywatch, his lifeguard post includes its own arm of the local government (complete with enough of a budget to afford things like ATVs). When confronted with the disgraced, former Olympian Matt Brody (Zac Efron), he's forced to put his feelings about the new recruit aside when they uncover a larger drug plot at hand that's threatening the entire bay. But when the police won't investigate, Lt. Mitch and his lifeguard crew decide to take matters into their own hands and dicks and boobs.  Like most unfortunate comedies to fall in this category, Baywatch substitutes actual jokes with raunchy humor. Now I don't have a problem with raunch in practice, as dick jokes are as classic as apple pie, but they're only great when they don't disrupt the flow of the film. It's hard to explain, but I'll try and elaborate on my problem with Baywatch's genitalia humor by outlining one of its more problematic scenes. In the first fifteen minutes or so, Ronnie (Jon Bass), the archetypal loser of the bunch, has a crush on the lifeguard CJ (Kelly Rohrback) -- who's only purpose in this film is to be ogled -- and chokes on some food when she runs by. After CJ delivers the heimlich maneuver (complete with thrusting), Ronnie becomes erect. But to hide it from her, he nervously stumbles until he falls and gets stuck, dick first, in a beach chair. Thus resulting in a large crowd of people surrounding Ronnie as CJ and Mitch talk about setting him free. If it sounds like my summary made the scene seem devoid of charm, it was actually much worse experiencing it first hand. Sure it serves the purpose of introducing Ronnie and CJ's dynamic, but paints their friendship in an unpleasant, slog of a light.  It's a shame Baywatch relies so much on low hanging fruit humor, since it can be intelligent when it puts forth an effort. When the film allows itself to be made fun of, it actually makes for pretty fantastic sequences. The film's opening, for example, combines all that you'd expect to see (Johnson diving in slow motion, wide shots of the beach) but injects with a major nod to how ridiculous it all is once the title card shows up. There are even a few inspired raunchy bits (like the talking balls gag), and the fact that Mitch never refers to Brody by his real name. These occasional bright spots in the dialogue only make the rest of the script more disappointing by comparison.  But the major factor at play is how straight it plays the premise. Baywatch, while occasionally winking at itself, also takes things much more seriously than you'd hope. Long stretches are dedicated to plot exposition, or un-interestingly shot action sequences. Rather than laugh, or even question what I was watching, I often found myself having no reaction at all. And with a comedy that clocks in at two hours, that's pretty much the equivalent of drowning in shallow water. It's something that could've easily been avoided had you tried to kick around a bit.  Like the vapid characters of its source material, Baywatch is great to look at but once it opens its mouth you realize how hollow it is. It's almost as if the entire film plays in slow motion.  Baywatch is a bad watch. I know I should feel guilty about not ending this review on a better joke, but that'd mean putting in more effort than the film did. 
Baywatch Review photo
So much emocean
Baywatch is another film in the same vein of nostalgic television reboots like The A-Team, CHiPs, and the crazily successful 21 Jump Street. A show known only for attractive people running in slow motion serving as a sor...

 photo

Eliza Dushku developing, starring in adaptation of Glen Cook's The Black Company


Else, you'd be like who? If pic current
Apr 26
// Rick Lash
The Black Company, a fantasy series written by Glen Cook and begun in 1984 spanning ten books, deals with magic, and an elite mercenary unit. It's kind of right up Eliza Dushku's alley, as you may remember her from her time o...
The Mist trailer photo
The Mist trailer

Trailer for Spike TV's The Mist series takes the Stephen King story beyond the store


It's all foggy and misty
Apr 12
// Hubert Vigilla
Frank Darabont's 2007 adaptation of The Mist played out like a long, taut episode of The Twilight Zone. The movie offered one hell of a downbeat final scene--maybe mockingly downbeat--that differed drastically from the closin...
 photo

Comedy Central's unleashing The President Show, starring: Donald Trump


This is NOT fake news
Apr 04
// Rick Lash
No matter where you find yourself on the political spectrum, there's likely a place for you to find agreement with the following statement: politics and the mainstream news are a circus and someone needs to help me laugh abou...
 photo

Recap: The Walking Dead Season 7 Finale


Apr 02
// Rick Lash
Season seven of AMC’s The Walking Dead began with the bat and it looked like things might end that way too.  We began, back in October, with the group at their all-time low point: they had been outmaneuvered at eve...

Every Power Rangers Season, Ranked

Mar 27 // Nick Valdez
Honorable Mention: Power Rangers Ninja Steel As of this writing, Ninja Steel is only ten episodes in (so halfway through the first half), so I can't fully rank it among the others yet. I've been enjoying what I've seen so far, however. Far removed from Neo-Saban's (when Saban reacquired the rights to the series' production in 2012) early growing pains, this season resets the age of the team -- they're teens in high school again -- and it's got all of the goofiness of the OG seasons but with better acting. I mean, they just introduced a gold ranger, who's a country western star and his helmet has a hat on it. What's not to like?  20. Power Rangers Operation Overdrive Summary: Two brothers try to steal a legendary crown (the Corona Aurora), but are imprisoned. Years later, explorer Andrew Hartford uncovers the crown, freeing the two bad bros. Andrew then brings in five folks, including his son, to become Power Rangers and gather the pieces of Corona Aurora before the baddies do.  Operation Overdrive is just a huge mess. I'm not exactly sure who or what to blame for its overall terribleness, but it's a combination of terribly written plots, terrible acting, terrible suits, a rap opening theme, and a bunch of characters who were all awful jerks. Seriously, this is the only season in Power Rangers where each member of the team is a selfish person with little redeeming value. The worst season of the Disney era, and the worst season overall.  19. Power Rangers Samurai/Super Samurai Summary: After otherworldly monsters invade feudal Japan, the Shiba clan trains generations of samurai to fight them and keep the otherworld (the Sanzu River) from flooding into the human one.  After Saban reacquired the production rights to the series from Disney in 2010 (which fans have dubbed the "Neo-Saban Era"), they took one of the shows I never thought would be adapted, Samurai Sentai Shinkenger. The original series was unequivocally Japanese, so naturally there would be translation pains. But Samurai was the victim of a lot of factors. The series had moved to Nickelodeon, seasons were cut down to 20 episodes apiece (thus separating each series into two halves), episodes were aired out of order (the premiere was the fourth one produced), acting was all around awful (not to mention the worst child acting of the series), and it directly adapted plots from the original Japanese series even if it didn't make much sense in English. But, regardless of all of these factors, the show became popular enough (again) to keep going, mostly due to how unique of the season's theme was.  18. Power Rangers Mystic Force Summary: After dark forces of magic threaten the world, a great sorceress gathers five destined teens to be become Power Ranger wizards and fight the armies of the undead.  Like Samurai, Mystic Force is another season with a theme unique from the rest. The magical world (along with the admittedly cool look for the rangers themselves) could've been a great thing. However, the season became too focused on world building, introducing new characters every few episodes rather than allowing the season to breathe and/or give its core Ranger team the focus necessary. It became a Red Ranger season, meaning the Red Ranger got the bulk of the character work, but this was also a huge misfire since the Red this season (named Nick, sadly) was bland and uninteresting. The finale also had a random "mystical creatures vs. normies" kind of thing that sort of popped up out of nowhere, but the less said about that the better.  17. Power Rangers Megaforce/Super Megaforce Summary: Five teens are chosen to defend the world from an invading insect army then unlock powers at an alarming rate, eventually resulting in the ability to morph into every generation of Power Rangers before them.  Okay, there's quite a bit to unpack here. Megaforce was technically announced as the 20th Anniversary of the series, but nothing was officially done about it until Super Megaforce. Imagine the combined 100 episodes of two different shows mangled into a 40 episode nonsense machine and that's Megaforce. Rapid pacing combined with random tributes to Power Rangers never seen before (not even editing the Sentai exclusive teams out of the footage), and an overall laziness contributed to this season's downfall. Even more troublesome was what happened behind the scenes during their big anniversary episode. Saban had initially invited a bunch of old cast members but rescinded many of those invites before filming because they had become too expensive. So that's why you get two minutes of Tommy toward the end of the season and not much more there. But the suits and power changes were cool, so whatever.  16. Power Rangers Turbo Summary: The Rangers drive cars really fast.  Turbo was such a bad season it nearly ended the series altogether. After debuting with Turbo: A Power Rangers Movie (which is oddly counted in the series' story despite being f**king terrible), it took footage from the Japanese Carranger, which was made as an intentional parody and saved Super Sentai overseas, and gave it gritty overtones. Its constant need to be taken seriously clashed with episodes where they got baked into a giant pizza or that one where Justin was stuck on a bicycle moving on its own. None of it was helped by a major casting change midway through when the OG cast decided to move on from the project after a few of them had stayed on for like a billion episodes. The one thing that saves this particular series is the fact I liked the new cast quite a bit. Patricia Ja Lee was the first Asian American Pink Ranger, and Selwyn Ward was a great Red Ranger. The two injected much of the needed personality this season (and beyond).  15. Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue Summary: When Demons attack Mariner Bay, the Lightspeed organization recruits five individuals with expertise to become a rescue squad of Rangers to save the day.  For these next few entries, there are seasons which were almost good but not quite there. These seasons often had great ideas but were hindered by other aspects of the production. Lightspeed Rescue was awesome for a number of reasons: The military theme gave the Rangers a more professional vibe than in seasons past; the suits had a nice, clean look to them; it had a good theme song; they created a unique power ranger for the series; and Carter Greyson was an awesome, no-nonsense Red Ranger who shot first and asked questions later. What keeps it from being great, however, is the lack of interesting villains, often befuddling writing (such as focusing the traditional team-up episode between seasons on some random child actor), and  the fact that one of the main villains was just terrible.  14. Mighty Morphin Power Rangers S3 Summary: The Rangers get ninja powers before turning into children and then aliens show up.  While fans are nostalgic for Power Rangers' initial run, most seem to forget how bad the third season was. A strong brand with the gradual loss of popularity, the writers had no idea what to really do anymore. With an increased budget leading to less Japanese footage, it adapted Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie into the series proper, adding in Ninja Powers, the Tengu Warriors, the Ninja Megazord (even using toy footage when the Ninja Megazord combined with the old Titanus zord), and eventually turning the Rangers into kids for the last half of the season. The brief (and terrible) Mighty Morphin Alien Rangers mini-season debuted here, and those are probably the worst episodes of the initial run. And I'm including Trini's troll doll. Still a lot better than the seasons higher up on the list, however.  13. Power Rangers Wild Force Summary: Five people are gathered on the floating island of Animaria, an island full of ancient animals called upon to protect the earth from pollution and environmental junk like that.  Wild Force suffers many of Lightspeed Rescue's issues,  with uninteresting villains (until the last few episodes anyway), weird decisions (their mentor was the worst), increased focus on Red Ranger, and an overbearing environmental message, but it's a rung above thanks to some standout episodes. Its crossover, "Reinforcements from the Future," is one of the best; the 10th Anniversary "Forever Red" episode remains one of my favorites; the suits were cool, and I actually was a fan of its Red Ranger until he committed an actual murder. I can't look at this season the same anymore, sadly.  12. Power Rangers Dino Charge/Dino Super Charge Summary: Five, then six, then seven, then ten people gather together when each discovers a long hidden dino gem, full of a transformative power that helps them fight the forces of evil.  The reason Megaforce was such a hearty failure is that it no longer had the excuse of Saban re-learning how to produce the series. But apparently they needed two series to figure out exactly how to handle things, because Dino Charge was a major improvement all around. It had better pacing, better filler episodes (meaning they don't contribute to the story but often provide character growth or comedy), a better cast of actors (Brandon Mejia is a great Red Ranger), and goes down in Ranger history for having the most Rangers on a single team at ten. Though not all of the Rangers were worthwhile (it's hard to develop ten different people in 40 episodes) and it fell apart toward the end, Dino Charge was still more enjoyable than most.  11. Power Rangers Zeo  Summary: After the destruction of the Command Center leaves them stranded, Zordon unveils a new set of powers from the Zeo Crystal, and this new level of power is needed more than ever against an invading machine legion.  Although Power Rangers was no stranger to change the first three seasons, the series didn't officially receive its first major overhaul until Zeo. Accompanied by an opening theme touting these new powers (based off of footage of a new season of Super Sentai) as "stronger than before," Zeo was an interesting thing. The Machine Empire had a larger villainous scope than Rita or Zedd, but they never accomplished anything concrete. There may have been a new Command Center, powers that technically grow in strength forever (thus leaving a plot hole for fans to argue about ad infinitum), and a starkly different suit overall, but Zeo also felt like a step down from the original series. It was a strange but much-needed transitional period, resulting in the loss of David Yost (who stepped out of the series due to terrible conditions behind the scenes), the loss of Karen Ashley's Aisha (who was written out of the show as a child), and the loss of quite a few viewers. This is where the nostalgia ends for most folks. But there were some great episodes within, like "King for a Day," which featured one of the best Bulk and Skull plots of the entire series. 10. Power Rangers Jungle Fury Summary: Three students of the kung-fu Order of the Claw are chosen to fight an ancient evil, Dai Shi, and rebalance the chi of the world.  Almost the final season of the series (before Disney decided to give it one last victory lap, RPM), it would've been a fine one to go out on. While it's got some goofy qualities (like talking flies and master karate folks turning into animals at the end for some reason), it was an ambitious season. Featuring only three initial Rangers (with a fourth and fifth debuting much later), this season played out like a kung-fu movie for kids. The suits are pretty cool, the fights were well choreographed in-suit and out, and instead of making a motorcycle to promote toy sales like other seasons, Jungle Fury chose to add three unique Rangers (who were initially evil puppets: another cool layer).  The finale may have been a bit rushed and unfulfilling, but it featured all eight Rangers fighting an undead army of monsters before a giant King Faux-dorah showed up for ten seconds. Also, the villains had a face turn, and that was pretty cool.  9. Power Rangers Lost Galaxy Summary: Five strangers pull five mystical swords out of a rock and gain the power to save their floating space colony from an evil scorpion.  While Lost Galaxy isn't one of my favorites, I have to give credit where it's due. It's a season filled with so many of my personal favorite episodes ("The Rescue Mission," "To the Tenth Power/The Power of Pink," just to name a few) and one of my favorite sixth Rangers (Magna Defender, who eventually turned his powers over to Leo's brother Mike), but its shoes were just too big to fill. This was the first season of the series where the cast rotated out every year, and the first of the post-Zordon era, and after In Space's great finale everything felt lacking, naturally.  No matter how good in might've been in retrospect, it's another victim of growing pains. Quite a common problem for the series overall, as you might've noticed.  8. Power Rangers Ninja Storm Summary: After their entire ninja school was kidnapped by the evil ninja Lothor, three less than great ninja students are chosen to become the Wind Ninja Power Rangers and fight to save their fellow ninjas.  Though Disney acquired the production rights to the series mid-Wild Force, its first actual foray into the show was a fantastic debut. Though fans had to get used to a lot of new norms (32 episode series lengths, New Zealand locations and actors, less direct violence), there was an overall newness to the series that felt like a breath of fresh air. This first season focused on three initial Rangers (which had never been done before) before adding two Rival Rangers to the foray and had some pretty great acting from its main cast. The main villain, Lothor, was too hokey for it, and some of the episodes bordered on cartoonish terribleness, but the stark contrast of its style to seasons before and after helped make its mark among the others.  7. Mighty Morphin Power Rangers S1 Summary: When evil sorceress Rita Repulsa escapes her prison of 10,000 years, a giant floating head and his robot butler recruit a team of teenagers with attitude. He endows them with dinosaur powers and they learn the value of teamwork and environmental friendliness.  Yes, the season of the series with the most fans isn't the best one. Though it began the Power Rangers legacy and introduced traditions (like the mythical sixth Ranger) and other mythos to the series, it was back before any nuance was added. There were monster-of-the-week episodes --  most of which are unmemorable (save for the "Rapping Pumpkin"), the teens themselves didn't have as much attitude as advertised (they were goodie goodies who recycled and the like), and it was back before good dialogue was a thing in this show. But, credit where it's due and all that.  6. Power Rangers Dino Thunder Summary: When the Mercer Corporation unleashes an army of dinosaurs, three kids stumble on dino powers and Tommy Oliver recruits them to form his very own team of Power Rangers.  When the ratings for the series began to falter, Disney brought the series back to its roots. A dinosaur theme, three Rangers at the start (which honestly might be why some of Disney's seasons worked so well), and the return of Jason David Frank as series mentor. Naturally, this meant Tommy Oliver got such a heavy focus (he became a Ranger again and got one of the best episodes of the series with "Fighting Spirit"), but the the rest of the cast were no slouches either. It takes quite a bit to take attention away from Tommy, but this team managed to do it.  The teens felt like teens for once (they fought among each other, hated school and things like training), the main villain was complicated (which was a welcome change post-Lothor), and it even managed an evil Ranger plot with everything else going on. It's not higher on the list because it has to compete with tighter series, but Dino Thunder is highly recommended.  5. Power Rangers SPD Summary: Space cops in the future.  I'll just say it outright: S.P.D. was slept on. With the best non-MMPR opening theme (which was no coincidence, as it brought back longtime composer Ron Wasserman) and the best suits from the Disney era, it nails a military theme that Lightspeed Rescue attempted years before. It also has a complicated set of Rangers in its core team, and is set years into the future, giving it a different vibe from previous seasons. Plus, there was a major story thread teased throughout which actually got the most focus toward the end of the season. A Power Rangers season with actual good foreshadowing? Yeah, it happened.  You see, this team was officially the "B Squad" or the second best. When the A Squad goes missing mid-season and re-emerges as bad guys toward the end. the final arc became overcoming their "second best" anxiety rather than taking on their generic villain.  4. Power Rangers Time Force Summary: Earth cops from the future.  Time Force is the closest to B-movie quality the series has ever come. With an older cast (some of whom with previous acting experience, which is why so much of the series is well acted), a team of Rangers from the future, some of the best suits the series has ever had, the best non-Tommy sixth Ranger (Eric the Quantum Ranger), and an unconventional villain (Rancic) who eventually gave up his evil ways when he put his daughter in danger. Though it's not a perfect series, as Rancic is the core of many of its problems (he's sort of an unsympathetic jerk despite the series trying to portray him as the opposite), and some of the team isn't as developed as others, the season featured quite a bit of nuance in its storytelling, which hadn't been present in the series before. It'd be years before it got that level of nuance again.  3. Mighty Morphin Power Rangers S2 Summary: Zordon's team of teenagers with attitude face even greater challenges than before like how to negotiate proper pay per episode.  The best season of Power Rangers' initial run was after they worked out the kinks. Lord Zedd was introduced, Tommy lost his Green Ranger powers and became the White Ranger, there's an episode where Kimberly impersonates Rita Repulsa, three of the original cast were written out of the show due to contract disputes, Rita and Zedd get married, the Green Ranger and White Ranger fight in colonial Angel Grove, and Kimberly goes back in time and fights a Mexican stereotype cactus monster with the help of Wild West versions of her friends.  Writing this all out highlights how goofy the season was overall, but that's what I love about it. It wasn't overly serious like the first season, didn't have the budget of the third season, and it's the version of the OG series I remember most fondly. Still not great, but great by early Power Rangers standards for sure.  2. Power Rangers RPM Summary: After a computer virus creates an army of machines, the remnants of humanity retreat to the domed city of Corinth, where a team of Power Rangers is the last line of defense for everyone.  Intended to be the final season of the series, showrunners decided to go for broke and throw everything they had into creating a post-apocalyptic film for kids. Lifting creative elements from films like Mad Max and Terminator, then adding a Power Rangers layer helped give this season a vibe no other season had before. It was more creatively cemented than years past, and actually had good cinematography, which had made RPM look much different than its predecessors. It truly had a sense of finality and reverence that the series had only had once before.  What keeps it from the top however, is  that behind-the-scenes events (going over budget, shifting showrunners) led to problems toward the second half. Most problematical, one of its major plots aped a famous villain from many years before. This may not have mattered to most fans, but this one small flaw does keep it from the top spot in my eyes. But not by much.  1. Power Rangers In Space Summary: When an army of villains defeats the Power Rangers, the team escapes into space and gains a new set of powers before returning to Earth and laying the smackdown on errybody.  Like RPM, In Space was originally going to be the final season of the show, but it had such good ratings it basically saved the series. Going for broke, the production team decided to send it off with a space opera. A villainess fondly remembered for her multiplicity (which was huge for a kids show), the return of Adam for a guest-starring role in an episode as the Black Power Ranger, a set of evil Rangers that took multiple episodes to defeat, a Silver Ranger with a cool sword gun, and an actual end to the story started years before in Mighty Morphin episode one.  It featured a finale (which, admittedly, seems weak in retrospect when compared to the better written seasons of the later years) that not only captured Power Rangers at its best but also reflected the series' campy-yet-serious spirit. It had a scope no other kids show had at the time and truly set the series on the path it's on today. There you have it! Those are how every season of Power Rangers ranks among the others. If you're looking for particular episodes to watch, here are my favorites:  1. "Doctor K" -- Power Rangers RPM E11 2. "Countdown to Destruction" -- Power Rangers In Space E42-43  3. "Green With Evil" Mighty Morhpin Power Rangers S1 E17-21
Power Rangers Month photo
After 10,000 years and 831 episodes
It's been a weird twenty something years. Power Rangers has seen good days and bad days, both supreme bouts of popularity and near cancellation. Yet somehow, this series has survived so long that it's managed to get three dif...

Every Sixth Power Ranger, Ranked

Mar 17 // Nick Valdez
19. Blue Senturion/Phantom Ranger -- Power Rangers Turbo Look at these goobs. Though never officially designated as sixth Rangers, both the Phantom Ranger and Blue Senturion fulfilled the role normally designated for the sixth. While Blue Senturion was introduced with a new set of powers and a zord, the Phantom Ranger was a mysterious guy that never got developed. There was apparently a planned plot to make him Zordon's son, but it fell through. It was probably because no one cared. Turbo was such a bad season overall, and it definitely suffered more with its terrible sixth Rangers.  18. Solaris Knight -- Power Rangers Mystic Force Look at this goob. One of Mystic Force's core issues were the numerous introductions to new characters without much follow through. One victim of this was the sixth addition, Solaris Knight. Debuting alongside some weird cat genie (which got its own special episode, one more than Solaris Knight had gotten), this was a Ranger that could've gone somewhere. Revealed to be the Red Ranger's long lost father, this guy used a lamp blaster gun and was just kind of an overall lamewad. He didn't have any of the majesty a legendary warlock Ranger required and just fell by the wayside after his introduction.  17. Mercury Ranger -- Power Rangers Operation Overdrive Look at this goob. Operation Overdrive had an entire team of goobs, but the one who stood out the most was the sixth addition Tyzonn. His story seemed interesting at first since he was a guy from another planet suffering from survivor's guilt after a team of rescue explorers he commanded had died on a mission. This was after he had been wandering around in a monster form for a few episodes too. But much like everything else that season, Tyzonn was an idea that went nowhere. He was latter shunted in favor of making him a weird dad always disciplining the rest of the team.  16. Gold Ranger -- Power Rangers Samurai What do you do when you cast a Thai actor for a Latinx character? Samurai seemed to think that meant turning him into a fisherman speaking in Tex-Mex. After being introduced by a flashback featuring the worst child acting in the entire series (which is saying a lot), Antonio came onto the scene spouting "fantastico" and using a fish blade. Admittedly he had a cool fighting style and was a shinier version of gold than seen in the past, but I'm sure this is one of those Rangers that made more sense in the Japanese version of the show. His dialogue was always annoying, but it is neat that he created his own zords...uh a squid and a lobster.  15. Gold Ranger -- Power Rangers Dino Charge  As you'll notice with a lot of these sixth Rangers, they all seem to be from another time or place. In Dino Charge, the Gold Ranger was Sir Ivan, a knight from some made-up country of Zandar. He was trapped in the body of one of the season's villains, Fury, until being freed during a big battle. But once his unique reveal was out of the way (he's the only sixth Ranger literally stuck inside of a monster instead of being one, being evil etc.) he was super boring. With his only quirk being occasional formal speech, his personality was bland. This wasn't helped at all by the eventual addition of four other Rangers to the team.  14. Robo Knight -- Power Rangers Megaforce Like much of Megaforce, Robo Knight didn't make any sense. Just as Turbo's Phantom Ranger and Blue Senturion weren't technically sixth Rangers, Robo Knight was this robot who apparently rested in the Earth for centuries until there was a threat to the environment. I mean, even if monsters had already attacked this guy didn't deem it necessary to intervene until some pollution mutants attacked. Once he was introduced, his whole schtick was being a robot who wanted to learn about human things (thus reading in the library seen above), but what's gotten him here over the others is that he eventually sacrifices himself to save the Rangers. But what knocks him back down is a revival a season later for no reason or explanation.  13. Ranger Operator Series Gold/Ranger Operator Series Silver -- Power Rangers RPM RPM was one of my favorite seasons of the series overall, but it also has some of the worst sixth Rangers ever. Twins Gem and Gemma were kids stuck in a laboratory developing young geniuses until the robot apocalypse destroys the place. Thought lost forever, the twins show up years later as the Gold and Silver Rangers. The had better suits and weapons than the rest of the team, but they finished each other's sentences when they spoke. It was this constant, annoying character trait that never ceased even as the series rolled on. The two didn't have time for character development either as they were introduced so close to RPM's endgame. Because of this, it's yet another idea that didn't quite fit the serious vibe of the season.  12. Lunar Wolf Ranger -- Power Rangers Wild Force Look at this goob. Like Dino Charge's Gold Ranger, Wild Force's sixth Ranger shared a body with a Wolf monster guy without knowing it. Also like most of the sixth additions, he was a warrior from another time who had silver streaks in his hair and really loved to play pool (loved it so much that his big super attack was pool related). On paper he sounds too goofy to work, and in practice this definitely rings true. But there's something about his goofiness that was just right for the series. Wild Force's season, overall, was this goofy message about environmental protection and the Red Ranger eventually went on to commit actual crime so it's a wash.  11. Super Megaforce Silver Ranger -- Power Rangers Super Megaforce In Super Megaforce, the team from Megaforce gained access to the powers of every past Ranger season and the sixth Ranger had all of the sixth powers. As a refugee from a war torn planet, Orion had all the makings of a good sixth Ranger. He had the most character growth out of anyone in the two seasons, but like a common complaint seen here he was just kind of boring after his introduction. Suffering from Super Megaforce's rapid pacing (and random episodes celebrating the anniversary), he rarely had any lines. Honestly, he made it this far up the list because his super mode included the goofily awesome shield seen above.  10. Green Samurai Ranger -- Power Rangers Ninja Storm Ninja Storm had a few problems, including how goofy their sixth Ranger eventually became, but this season absolutely nailed their sixth Ranger. Cam, son of the Ninjas' sensei and basically the Billy of the season (serving as the guy who provides tech and info), became the sixth Ranger after being sent back in time, learning a bit more about the Ninja code, and having a discussion with his deceased mother in order to gain confidence. It was a two-parter that was a highlight of the season overall. It felt like an earned, natural evolution of a character we'd seen since the first episode. The only thing knocking him back is his stupid baseball motif and electric guitar weapon.  9. Silver Ranger -- Power Rangers In Space Oh guess what? It's another guy from another world and time! After sustaining a severe injury, Andros (the Red Ranger of this season) seals Zhane a tube and waits two years for him to heal. Other than taking the boss ass suit from In Space and making it even cooler, this guy had a laser sword. There hadn't been enough laser swords in Power Rangers, oddly enough so this was a delight. Although his actor was bland, they actually gave Zhane a lot of personality. He was in a faux love triangle with Ashley and Andros, he had an on again, off again thing with the season's villain Astronema, he tricked the rest of the team into thinking he was dying, and he even dressed up as one of the Psycho Rangers in a creative way to beat one of them. After Turbo's lackluster sixth additions, it really helped to get a guy who actually did things.  8. White Dino Ranger -- Power Rangers Dino Thunder The first Ranger on this list to not come from another world or time. Trent was the son of the season's villain, Anton Mercer (who himself was a split personality of the actual villain of the season, Mesogog...long story), and gains Ranger powers when he stumbles on the White Dino Gem. Since Mesogog had given the gem evil influence or something, Trent's Ranger form is actually an evil Power Ranger that he can't control. After throwing around the team for a few episodes, he joins them in full (sound familiar?). But what's different about his introduction is the eventual cloning of his power, leading to a White Ranger vs. White Ranger fight (...sound familiar?). Trent was a bit of a lamewad that wanted to pursue art (...terrible art), and his evil self didn't really accomplish much when you boil it down. But at least he's a lot cooler than others on this list!  7. Shadow Ranger -- Power Rangers S.P.D. Doggie was the Chief of Space Patrol Delta who's wife was presumably killed by the season's villain. When he finally confronted the main villain, he was attacked by 100 monsters (eventually reflected by the cool "100" on his suit) and became the Shadow Ranger. He probably had the coolest suit of S.P.D. overall, and Doggie eventually landed the final critical blow during the season finale, but as we reach the higher ranks on the list he's been bumped down by some personal faves of mine.  6. Magna Defender -- Power Rangers Lost Galaxy Magna Defender might not be considered a sixth Ranger by fans, but I've always considered him one. With two versions of the character (both badass), there was plenty to work with. The first Defender was a father avenging the death of his son (who was straight up killed on-screen), and the second was Leo (the Red Ranger)'s thought dead brother from the first episode, Mike. Using a sword (that also was a gun) to transform into a Knight looking guy, Defender was even able to grow and become his actual Megazord. He even sacrificed his powers to save the entire space colony toward season end, which was just another example of how selfless Mike was (as he both sacrificed himself to save his brother in the pilot, and refused to take the Red Ranger powers even if he was the rightful owner of them). He was also the first Ranger to have a cape in the series. Capes are cool.  5. Titanium Ranger -- Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue The Titanium Ranger may not be the coolest Ranger on this list (though try arguing an axe-gun isn't cool), but he cracks the top five by being unique. See, the rest of the Rangers on this list were a by-product of their parent Japanese versions. Kyukyu Sentai GoGoFive, the series Lightspeed Rescue took its footage from, didn't have a sixth Ranger so the showrunners decided to make one for themselves. It's why his suit's so bulky in comparison to the others, and the only thing that kept him relevant to the story was a snake curse that threatened to kill him everyday in his dreams or something, but I'll give credit where it's due. Being an entirely American invention was a risk, but it's one that paid off. If he didn't show up, fans would have definitely questioned why there wasn't a traditional sixth member.  4. Gold Ranger -- Power Rangers Zeo Zeo kind of fudged the Gold Ranger's first introduction by laying out this mystery before revealing his identity as a goob who turned into three goobs (who know one knew, so it was a wash). But it definitely made up for it the second time around. After introducing several candidates who could've been a great Gold Ranger (Tommy's brother, Billy), and after keeping his identity hidden, his eventual reveal as Jason (the former Mighty Morphin Red Ranger) was one of the biggest surprises (and bits of fan service) the series had since Tommy's reveal as the White Ranger. Jason fit the series like a glove, and the character's history with Tommy eventually led to the great "King for a Day" two-parter which had the two fighting for the first time since their season one days, and had a cooler look than the rest of the team overall. What keeps him out of the top three, however, is the fact that the goob triplets have to come back and take the powers away because story reasons or something, I don't know.  3. White Ranger -- Mighty Morphin Power Rangers S2-S3 Well, at least one version of Tommy was going to get the top spot and it's definitely not the White Ranger. While he's cool and all (much cooler than a lot of the list by nature of his very existence), and he's the one thing taken from the Japanese series Gosei Sentai Dairanger from where MMPR season two got most of its footage from, Tommy doesn't really do much after his great introduction. His surprise reveal (coming down from a beam of white light in, uh, "White Light") after the loss of his Green Ranger power was a great moment, but he just became the de-facto leader of the team after the original Red Ranger was written out of the series. Despite his cool new theme and talking sword making him seem different, and fighting Lord Zedd to a standstill once, this was just Tommy all over again. To me it always felt like a downgrade from the Green Ranger power rather than the intended upgrade. I mean, just ask folks who remember the show. Do they say they want to be the White Ranger or the Green Ranger? It's always Green before White.  2. Quantum Ranger -- Power Rangers Time Force What? Tommy isn't both of the top spots? Well, no. Time Force was one of the best seasons of the series for its great villain, great Pink Ranger, great Red Ranger character arc, and notably, its sixth Ranger. In fact, the Quantum Ranger was so effective he was even brought back to a Red Ranger exclusive anniversary team up years later. As a rival to the richly born Wes (the Red Time Force Ranger), Eric was a poor kid who worked hard all of his life in order to prove he was just as good as the rich kids. Eventually growing to resent rich boys like Wes, he forced his way into Ranger powers by finding the Quantum Power first. Taking most things by force, he led a military team to attack the mutants (the baddies in Time Force), eventually gained control of the Q-Rex Megazord, and was more of an anti-hero through the season. Eventually he grew to be friendly with the others, even lending his Quantum Power to Wes toward the end of the season. On top of having a fantastic actor, Daniel Southworth, the Quantum Ranger was the first sixth member to have a full character arc since Tommy's in MMPR. With the added layer of not being mind controlled, or under some evil spell, Eric was just a guy who was so used to fighting for what he wanted he hated when others just seemed to get things handed to them.  1. Green Ranger -- Mighty Morphin Power Rangers S1 As it could be any other Ranger. The Green Ranger is important for a number of reasons. It started the sixth Ranger tradition (even for the Japanese Super Sentai, as he was the first over there too), the "Green With Evil" story line is one of the most fondly remembered by fans (both hardcore and nostalgic), Jason David Frank's see-ayaaaahs became a hallmark of the series (with JDF starring in five seasons over the course of the series) as he eventually became the face of it, and it was the first time I remember being engrossed by a TV series as a kid. Here was this evil guy with all of the powers of the good guys, only much cooler with a friggin' Dragon and better fighting skills, who went from bad guy to good guy over the course of a week.  I remember school feeling so long that week as I waited to see the next part of the epic story. No other Ranger (sixth or otherwise) has left that big of an impression. So big, in fact, folks are clamoring for his addition to the new movies. While I'm sure the Green Ranger will be added to the films, the new version will never be as cool as the original. 
Power Rangers Month photo
Rangering through the six with my woes
Through its 24 seasons or so of existence, Power Rangers has become a show with its own set of traditions. Each season of the show may change, but a lot of the core elements stay the same: a rocking theme, colored spandex, an...

Every Power Rangers Theme Song, Ranked

Mar 10 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221220:43333:0[/embed] 20. Power Rangers Operation Overdrive (2007) Back when Disney owned the rights to Power Rangers, they made quite a bit of changes in order to reinvent it for their network. Punches and kicks were replaced by more lasers, explosions allegedly couldn't occur in front of the Rangers themselves, and they wanted to do a rap theme for some time. Unfortunately for all of us, their idea of rap was total garbage.  Highlighting the worst season of Power Rangers is faux-techno rap babble with the lyrics "There's treasures to be found, there's some lives to be saved, our planet to look after, there's a whole lot of space!" There's a whole lot of something, all right.  [embed]221220:43334:0[/embed] 19. Mighty Morphin' Alien Rangers (1996)  I wasn't originally going to count this, as the Alien Rangers arc is the capper of Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers' final season and it's merely a copy of the OG theme with "alien rangers" in the lyrics, but you'll see in the next couple of entries this theme has a bit more effort in it than others.  I'm giving it credit for merely existing when it didn't need to. We didn't need a new theme, but it was nice to hear something different in preparation for the major reboot the series would go through a season later.  [embed]221220:43335:0[/embed] 18. Power Rangers Samurai (2011) / Power Rangers Super Samurai (2012) When Saban re-acquired the rights to Power Rangers (which fans have dubbed the "Neo-Saban"-era), they chose to reintroduce the series to kids on Nickelodeon with a remix of the show's original theme with the additional lyrics, "Rangers Together, Samurai Forever." But unlike the Alien Rangers theme, this remix is weak. I get the need to reintroduce the series' mythos to a new generation, but Saban missed the chance to highlight the show's obviously Japanese influences.  It's reflective of Saban's growing pains over the next few seasons that'll only get worse. Even worse is having the characters shout their names during the title sequence, treating kids like little idiots.  [embed]221220:43336:0[/embed] 17. Power Rangers Megaforce (2013) / Power Rangers Super Megaforce (2014) Megaforce was a worse season than Samurai in a lot of ways. Chiefly it's biggest disappointment was in how lazy of a show it was. It's exactly the same theme, complete with characters shouting their names during the credits, but it's just slightly better thanks to the first couple of seconds. With a season as lazy as this was, take what you can get.  [embed]221220:43337:0[/embed] 16. Power Rangers Mystic Force (2006) Just as Operation Overdrive somehow needed a rap in its theme song, Mystic Force was the first attempt at it. It's not a full-on trash rap, nor is it just a retread, but it's not an accomplishment by any means. This season was weak for a number of reasons, but the theme should've been the first indicator of its overall terribleness. [embed]221220:43354:0[/embed] 15. Power Rangers Jungle Fury (2008) Remember the band Metro Station? What about 3OH!3? Well, if either or those bands wrote a Power Rangers theme song it'd be whatever the hell this song is. Taking advantage of the faux-emo wave at the time is this piece of work which in no way suited a cool season of kung-fu Rangers.  Jungle Fury had a lot of great things going for it, but I could imagine this theme song turning kids away. It's just way too in your face with its awfulness.  [embed]221220:43338:0[/embed] 14. Power Rangers RPM (2009) Originally intended to be the final season of the series, as Disney got tired of spending money on it, RPM was a surprisingly mature story of the last bits of humanity fighting against machine apocalypse. Borrowing imagery from films like Mad Max and Terminator, this series was as awesome as Power Rangers has ever gotten...but the theme didn't tell you any of that. Other than some techno mess in the middle of it, this theme was a little too generic. All it's got to offer are a few "Power Rangers RPM, get in gear!" thrown in every now and again, and it's a letdown for what's arguably the best season of the series.  But it's not a rap song, so there's that.  [embed]221220:43341:0[/embed] 13. Power Rangers Wild Force (2002) Wild Force was basically a Power Rangers version of Captain Planet, as the Rangers fought against pollution and what not, so a boring season unfortunately got an equally boring theme song. There's nothing technically wrong with the song, it's just a little too loud and busy to really hit home. Accompanying animal roars, a tone that's constantly aggressive, with nothing sticking out to make it unique. The best seasons (as you'll read in a bit) have themes with distinguishing, memorable characteristics. Don't expect anyone to remember this.  [embed]221220:43340:0[/embed] 12. Power Rangers Ninja Storm (2003)  Ninja Storm's opening theme is about as forgettable as Wild Force's, but what makes it win over in the end is how unique it is. Matching its series' tone of extreme sports loving ninja masters is a chill rock song that helps play up the "Storm" in the series title. There still has yet to be a theme like it.  [embed]221220:43342:0[/embed] 11. Power Rangers Lost Galaxy (1999) Since Lost Galaxy was the first self-contained season of the series, not continuing the story started in MMPR, it needed a theme that sounded wholly different than what had come before. And it got that...for the first thirty seconds or so. As the first opening theme of the series not composed by Ron Wasserman (who's credits include MMPR through In Space and the Mummies Alive! opening theme), it's different enough to stand out yet feels similar enough to themes before. But after the great "ahhhhhhhh," it starts feeling repetitive. Granted all of these themes are repetitive, but this one really lets down its grandiose beginning.  [embed]221220:43343:0[/embed] 10.  Power Rangers Ninja Steel (2017) Since this season just premiered it might be a bit too soon to have the opening theme crack the top ten, but it's pretty dang good. It's the opening few seconds that really drive the point home. While I'm not sure if the series will live up to the Asian influences the theme presents, it already seems much different than seasons before. Coupled with a remix of the original theme (in order to keep building the mythos, as mentioned) thrown in for good measure, and I'm pretty stricken with it.  [embed]221220:43344:0[/embed] 9. Power Rangers Turbo (1997) As the only season of the series to premiere with a movie, Turbo didn't have to do much. The season itself had a ton of problems, but its theme has the best final seconds of any season. While the full version of this theme breaches hilariously bad territory (complete with a car starting up for the first 20 seconds), the show's 30 second cut was amazing. It's surprising the series never returned to 30 second themes, but it at least helped Turbo.  [embed]221220:43346:0[/embed] 8. Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue (2000) I don't know why, but Lightspeed Rescue has the one theme I found myself singing the most as a kid. Like Lost Galaxy, the second half doesn't have as much to offer as the first but I prefer the lyrics here than in most of the other themes. It's goofy, but in a series about an emergency rescue team of Rangers, the lyrics "the signal is calling, our planet is falling, the danger will test you, better make it Lightspeed Rescue!" are just hype.  [embed]221220:43345:0[/embed] 7. Power Rangers Zeo (1996) Zeo marked a lot of first for the series. It was the first reboot, it was the first time the Rangers had wholly new suits and powers, and it was the first real season to change the theme. Thankfully, it delivered on everything it was supposed to. With lyrics like "stronger than before" and "powered up for more," mixed it with the standard "Go Go Power Rangers!" you really got the idea that these new powers were different, better maybe.  [embed]221220:43347:0[/embed] 6. Power Rangers Dino Charge (2015) / Power Rangers Dino Super Charge (2016) Speaking of remixes, Saban wouldn't get it right until much much later with Dino Charge. The first good season of the Neo-Saban era, Dino Charge burst out of the gate with a theme sounding like an original until it reminded you that it's a remix of the original song. If Power Rangers could've been reintroduced with this series, this opening theme, than it be a much bigger hit for Nickelodeon than it is now. There's something about dinosaur themes that really makes Power Rangers pop.  [embed]221220:43350:0[/embed] 5. Power Rangers In Space (1998) Just as how RPM was intended to be the final season of the series years later, In Space was initially planned to be the final season before doing well enough in the ratings thanks to its space opera narrative. This theme may have an atonal quality to its lyrics, but the opening countdown has always set it apart in my mind. As the final theme (at the time) composed by Ron Wasserman, it has a ton going for it. The final half, while admittedly as repetitive as other themes on this list, is too hype to pass up. I think the "go go go fly!" always does me in, haha.  [embed]221220:43352:0[/embed] 4. Power Rangers Time Force (2001)  Time Force was a much better season than it got credit for. It was right around the time less kids paid attention to it as we were all starting to grow out of waking up early on Saturdays, but it had so much good in it. The actors were all great (most of them having had experience in film and TV beforehand, which is sadly notable for this series), the premise was great (time patrollers fighting mutants), and it had a memorable theme song. The guitar solo here was the best in a long time and it's better than a lot that came after it. Just like how In Space has a line that does me in, here it's "timeless wonders, fire and thunder, all to save the world." It's goofy when written out, but trust me on this.  [embed]221220:43351:0[/embed] 3. Power Rangers Dino Thunder (2004) As I'm sure you've guessed, Power Rangers has gone through tons of reinventions and new beginnings in order to keep kids entertained. Disney bought the rights to the series mid-Wild Force, but it wasn't until after Ninja Storm that Disney had their own take on the series. To go along with another dinosaur themed team of Rangers, the series also tried to bring back old fans with Jason David Frank, an evil Ranger storyline, and most importantly, a kick-ass rock theme song. This theme is probably the closest to an actual "song" in the entire series, and it's the one theme that's most fit for a sing along. With the strongest lyrics of the entire series, this theme song is only beaten by musical greats. [embed]221220:43349:0[/embed] 2. Power Rangers S.P.D. (2005) Although Ron Wasserman composed a few demos during the Disney era, only one of them really made it to the actual show. Thankfully, it was the best one. The only theme on this list to highlight percussion rather than guitar riffs made it stand out for a number of reasons. It's entirely strong throughout with a kick-ass opening and a final ten seconds which elevate it over the other seasons' themes. It'd be the best overall if not for the final entry on this list.  [embed]221220:43353:0[/embed] 1. Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers (1993-1995) C'mon, like I was going to put something else here. I'd be lying to myself, and you, if I didn't pay tribute to the original. It's the theme everyone remembers for a reason. With a harder rock composition than kids deserved, it treated this new series with an awesome reverence that would sadly never get matched again.   They just don't make theme songs like this for kids anymore. 
Power Rangers Themes photo
Go Go
[Editor's Note: This feature has been re-posted in honor of Power Rangers Month on Flixist] Pop culture is full of different kinds of media, but the ones with the most lasting power all do a very important thing: build mythos...

BADaptation: Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie

Mar 09 // Nick Valdez
[embed]215186:39856:0[/embed] Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The MovieDirector: Bryan SpicerRating: PGRelease Date: June 30, 1995 I'd like to clarify a few things before I get started. This article isn't a review of some kind where I'll point out whether MMPR:TM is a good or bad film (although a good deal of us can agree and which end of the spectrum it lies). I'm going to focus on why it's a bad adaptation of the original TV show, and how it's "badness" affects the property overall. Also, I'm very aware that the TV show itself uses Japanese blah blah blah (although I didn't learn about it until I saw an episode of VH1's I Love the 90s), but that doesn't matter here either since I'm going to reference the show as the standalone version it's meant to be. Okay now since that's out of the way, we can get to the good stuff.  Mighty Morphin Power Rangers was a Saturday morning TV show on FOX Kids (then later weekdays) about five "teenagers with attitude" picked by a giant floating head named Zordon to fight the recently awakened Rita Repulsa (and later Lord Zedd). To fight this evil, they're given the powers of dinosaurs and were able to transform into five/six colored heroes. MMPR: The Movie however, greatly changes this formula. In the film, the six teenagers instead have to fight a new villain, Ivan Ooze (the amazing Paul Freeman!), but instead are launched to an alien planet in order to gain the "ancient powers of Ninjeti" (or ninja skills to pay the bills) and save Zordon, who has now been reduced from a floating head to a dying man.  One of MMPR:TM's (which I'm going to refer to as The Movie from now on to save time) first inherent issues is that it has to take a story from a 23 minute an episode series and expand it to fit at least a 90 minute film. And to fix the problem, The Movie's solution is to just tell a standalone story all together. While this all well and good, since not every adaptation needs to rely on the original's material to succeed, it's a little disheartening when you realize that the show's wide array of available, expandable stories weren't deemed worthy enough to get a bigger screen, wider audience version. By taking only key elements of the original, it's hard to see how The Movie is an adaptation at all.  But sadly it is. The Movie needs to be an adaptation to work since it apparently wants to be a companion piece to the show. It assumes the audience has an established familiarity with the franchise and eschews traditional character introduction. It boils down the "teenagers with attitude" to "teenagers who participate in extreme sports," there's no origin story (the Power Rangers are already Power Rangers), and lots of information and terminology are thrown around without real weight given to anything. And on top of this is the original story which introduces brand new characters to the franchise (Ivan Ooze, that pig thing, the Tengu warriors, and Dulcea) and treats them (with the exception of Ivan Ooze) like they've been a part of the series forever. I'm sure this must have been confusing as all get out for the poor parents (mine, of course) who were dragged by their kids to see this.  And if the new content is delivered in a confusing manner and not tied to show in any fashion, how important is that new content? The greatest thing about the Power Rangers television series is that despite the goofy look of everything and quirky dialogue exchanges, everything is given importance and weight while still tinged with humor. Every fight in the series is for the fate of the Earth and those five kids seem like underdogs who eventually overcome great odds. With The Movie's larger budget (which means mo' money mo' problems), the teens get new suits with all sorts of fancy gadgets like headlights and infrared vision, different weapons like tasers, and are now suddenly able to perform all sorts of fancy acrobatics and wire work. Even when they lose their powers for a bit (spoilers?) and become awesome ninjas, there doesn't seem to be a big difference between their powerless selves and powerful selves. These Power Rangers are unrecognizable.  So now we have an adaptation, that's not a true adaptation, full of unrecognizable characters. Were there any positives? Did The Movie manage to adapt anything well? Well...yes and no. For some reason when The Movie adapts a factor of the original series well, it somehow makes the adaptive material look more ridiculous than it should. For one, the series and film take place in the city of Angel Grove and answers a question I had for a long time. Where are all the people? With the extra run time and money available to The Movie, Angel Grove is full of people that do things. In the show, there's no room for normal people problems when there's giant robots to be had. But in giving the citizens something to do (and for having them exist in the first place), it makes the Power Rangers look like terrible heroes. In the film they're so wrapped up in defeating Ooze and saving Zordon, the citizens of Angel Grove nearly jump off a cliff. They're only lucky some random kid stuck his nose into their business.  Another great choice The Movie makes which hurts the TV show is giving the film a great standalone villain. Since the film's budget could afford a great actor like Paul Freeman (Dr. Belloq in Raiders of the Lost Ark), it unfortunately makes the TV show's villains seem more ridiculous than they purport to be. Freeman is great as Ooze. He hams up the screen, and his performance lies somewhere between perfect in tone and borderline ridiculous. And CG animating the giant robot fight at the end seems like a good decision, but it just takes what supposed to be a great event and turns it into a huge joke. The Power Rangers' new Megazord is now just some weird robot with no face (but still has a conspicuous blonde mustache) who crotch kicks to win.  All in all, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie was perfect to me at the time. As a kid, I was so enamored with the premise I had no idea The Movie actually takes the original's material and tries to turn it into some sort of epic story that doesn't work. There's an air of seriousness about the film (but without the accepted ridiculousness the TV show brings) which sort of takes the soul out of Power Rangers. Sure the goofy humor and all the characters you love and recongnize are still present, but they're not themselves.  Oh I almost forgot something. What kind of Power Rangers movie doesn't feature the ridiculawesome rawkin' theme song for more than thirty seconds? For all of the reasons above, my friends, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie is...a BADaptation. 
Power Rangers BADaptation photo
It's Morphin' Time...apparently
[Editor's Note: This feature was written four (!) years ago in anticipation of a rumored Power Rangers reboot. It has been re-posted for Power Rangers Month.] I knew as soon as I joined the Flixist staff that one day I would ...

How To Do It: Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers Reboot

Mar 03 // Nick Valdez
1. Start over from the beginning. In the press release, the new film is classified as a "re-imagining" of the old show. This makes perfect sense given most of the audience of the first couple of seasons have now grown up and are willing to thrown down major cash on a nostalgic property. The problem with this is, those same people have too fond memories of the show. They've built it up to some pedestal, so any new film is already needing to prove itself. What most of you all out there need to remember is, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers is really, really bad. Bad dialogue, bad acting, and some of the most 90s situations you'll find on children's television.  But that's also not a bad thing. If we go into this new movie with an open mind, and the new film starts over from the beginning,  then we're in for a good time. So to be successful, the reboot needs to use the bankable names of the original five (maybe six) "teenagers with attitude" (Zack, Kimberly, Billy, Trini, Jason) because those are the names we'll remember. Most old fans won't remember who played those characters, so it's not important to bring the actors back, but we will remember the names. Start over from the beginning, tell the same simple origin story (teenagers are chosen by a floating space man to fight monsters), and we're golden. No need to reinvent the wheel.  2. Don't bring back old actors from the show.  When movie studios "reimagine" properties, they cast an entirely new set of people to play the characters we all know and love. That's going to be the case here. In order to completely separate itself (and thus create a new universe of movies), keep the television actors away. For example, Jason David Frank (who played Tommy in over 242 episodes of Power Rangers, and is arguably the most popular actor in the series) is already lobbying his fans to write to "lion gates" in order to get in the new movie. If they have to bring him (or anyone) back, and chances are they will, make sure it's only in a cameo capacity. Maybe have Tommy run the juice bar (like in the Wild Force episode, "Forever Red"), pass the torch to the new kids, and then disappear forever. As much as we might like the guy, seeing a thirty year old man run over in a tight spandex suit for a kid's show (like he is in the upcoming Power Rangers Super Megaforce finale) is kind of sad. Besides, the new kids watching this movie won't really know or care who Jason David Frank or any of these older actors are.  3. Use actors who can believably do their own stunts (and real suits!) One of the reasons Power Rangers became such a hit was because it delivered on things we've never had before. Although the acting and dialogue were bad, it had great action. It had cartoon action brought to real life, and it was pretty f**king cool. The series also still has some of the best fight choreography around. It's important to bring that back. Can you imagine what the fight effects could look like with a larger budget? Remember what the fights looked like in Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers: The Movie? Never mind, those were terrible. But a bigger budget could lead to bigger things. It's simple. Keep the suits real, but CG everything else. Like any other superhero, it's all about tangibility.  And that comes from the actors too. In the show, the teens would still kick butt out of the suits. Story wise, it shows the audience the effect of the power coins, and quality wise, it helps the audience attach the person to the hero. It's very important for us to remember who's in the suits. It's not enough for people to put them on, we have to believe people are in them.  4. Have a good villain.  Whether the new film goes with Rita Repulsa, Lord Zedd or even Ivan Ooze, it's important to have a memorable bad guy. Once again, don't reinvent the wheel. Don't create a new, generic villain for the film unless the right person is behind it (Paul Freeman was the only reason Ivan Ooze worked in the movie), and there's plenty of material to draw from so there's no reason to create a new one anyway. If I could have it my way, I'd go for Rita Repulsa. She's the greater villain since she posed a threat, her powers led to the "Green With Evil" storyline which introduced a sixth ranger, and she has some of the best catchphrases ("You're giving me a headache!" "Magic wand, make my monster grow!").  If they went that route, they could introduce Lord Zedd for the sequel (just don't make him overtly dark or scary, remember it's for kids!), lead in to their wedding, Serpentera, and the possible stories are endless. All I'm saying is the material is there, so Lionsgate would be wise to use it.  5. Do it for the kids.  This is hardest thing to say, but this new movie isn't going to be for me or you, it's for the kids. Although the name is there to get butts to the seats, Saban's probably trying to make this work into a children's franchise. It's going to be an all ages affair, so don't expect a dark and gritty take on these heroes. No blood, no adult situations, and the word "kill" will be replaced with "destroy." But that's the way it's always been, and it's always worked, so no reason to be worried about that now.  As long as the new movie gets the tone right. That's actually the most important thing on this list. Please don't take this movie seriously as nothing about the Power Rangers is serious. And even when the show decides to lean toward heavier subjects, it's only because they're destroying all of the current zords to introduce a new line of zords/toys to kids.  6. Don't forget to have fun.  With the rising amount of gritty reboots these days (just look at Man of Steel, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Spider-Man, and Transformers), I'm a little worried about how this'll turn out. Power Rangers has survived all these years despite its bevy of bad decisions because it's so lovably goofy. It's always so sincere about its laughably bad puns, heavy handed messages of protecting the environment and teamwork, and telling its stories with a half baked seriousness. Although every week a new monster threatens to destroy the world, there's still time to ride dirt bikes as part of the high school dirt bike club or something. It just all meshes together in a tone that works for everyone.  There's action, comedy, giant robots punching other giant things in the face, and lots of attractive men and women. If the new movie gets even one of those right, that'll be morphinominal. 
HTDI: Power Rangers photo
There's a wrong way, and there's a Morphinominal way
The Power Rangers series is an odd one. It started out as one of Saban Entertainment's many attempts to re-dub a Japanese kids show for American audiences and turned into a juggernaut spanning 21 seasons, comics, videogames, ...

Top 10 Weirdest Power Rangers Episodes

Mar 01 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221257:43435:0[/embed] 10. "And...Action!" (Power Rangers RPM, Episode 23)  While Power Rangers RPM definitely earns a spot as one of the better seasons of the series, it was no stranger to strangeness. After losing the season's showrunner (whether it was his own volition or not is still up in the air to this day) and finding a replacement, one episode of RPM was dedicated to catch-up. With a behind the scenes special breaking up the series just as it was heading into the final plot of the season. this was just an anomaly. As everyone stayed in character, fans didn't even get a full-on behind the scenes special. It was this weird, half-assed thing ultimately only making sense when all of the production trouble came to light years later.  9.  "Once a Ranger" (Power Rangers Operation Overdrive, Episodes 20-21)  As the series went on, the central cast changed several times leading to fan-favorite crossover episodes when a previous Ranger team joined forces with a current one. For the show's 15th anniversary, then current owner Disney decided to have a special team-up episode featuring a few of their seasons. The resulting episode highlighted how the series can put a ton of effort into being lazy. Shortcuts (they found Alpha in a box), Adam returning without the MMPR theme music yet everyone else having theirs, a supposed son of Zedd and Rita with a weird costume, and showcasing how terrible of a team Overdrive was, this was the weirdest crossover ever. It's just strange that they did it at all considering how it felt like everyone involved hated the idea.  8. "Rocky Just Wants to Have Fun" (Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers S2, Episode 32)  Most of Power Rangers' early seasons had episodes dedicated to teaching all sorts of values and moral lessons. My personal favorite also happened to be the weirdest one of the bunch. Sure there were episodes featuring ugly troll dolls and rapping pumpkins, but I still can't believe there was an episode about how much Rocky loved gambling. When the Juice Bar gets a pachinko machine, Rocky gets hooked to thing. Every time someone asks him to do things, he's like "I'm just going to play." It's kind of like that one episode about humans dating robots on Futurama when the kid says "No thanks, I'd rather just make out with my Monroe-bot." Then the pachinko machine takes monster form and turns the Power Rangers into balls. I almost went with the football monster episode here (because that's another case of the Rangers being turned into inanimate objects) but that was goofy rather than weird and this is my list anyway so whatever.  7. "Movie Madness" (Power Rangers Time Force, Episodes 24-25)  Power Rangers Time Force was the closest the series had come to great B-movie territory. The best actors in the series to date, and honestly the best story overall at that point. But as with RPM, being a good series didn't save it from Power Rangers' trademark weirdness. In this episode, a monster named Cinecon traps the team inside of their favorite movie genres. A jungle movie, a samurai film, a Western, an even a kung-fu flick featuring the Jackie Chan knock-off Frankie Chang. It sticks out like a sore thumb among the other episodes of this season since it's really the only time any of them have any fun. Also, there hadn't been an episode like it (other than "Wild West Rangers," which almost took the spot here for the Mexican Cactus monster) yet or since, really.  [embed]221257:43436:0[/embed] 6. "Shell Shocked" (Power Rangers In Space, Episode 4) While not the first crossover episode, and not even the first crossover with another series, this one is definitely the weirdest by far. Since Fox was promoting Ninja Turtles: The Next Mutation at the time, the cast managed to pop up in an episode of Power Rangers. When the turt bros and sis get a little too turnt on Astronema's mind control, they take control of the Rangers' space ship and almost ruin everything. But without any of the good stuff from crossover episodes (fights between teams showcasing why each team is great), this was just a weird, clear-cut commercial for a bad show.  5. "Another Song and Dance" (Power Rangers Zeo, Episode 46) When a show runs as long as Power Rangers has, there are bound to be musical episodes. It's a standard trope of TV and, when done well, can be great. But in Zeo's case, it sure was awful. When a spell causes Tommy and Aisha to sing all of their dialogue, you've got some hokey weirdness because 1.) No one else is singing and 2.) It's all sans music. So you've got two singing fools just singing instead of speaking normally for no reason.  4. "Lost and Found in Translation" (Power Rangers Dino Thunder, Episode 19)  Dino Thunder was Disney's attempt to wrangle in old fans of the series (with Jason David Frank's return as Tommy) and this all came to a head with this episode. As Power Rangers borrowed footage from Toei's Super Sentai series, there had been an unspoken rule about not saying it out loud. But with Dino Thunder's cheeky in-jokes, came this episode. Showing a poorly dubbed over episode of its parent series, Bakuryuu Sentai Abaranger, Dino Thunder poked fun at the idea of fans preferring one over the other. But I can't imagine how off-putting this must've been for kids at the time. Here they were told Japan stole the Power Rangers idea and decided to make a knock-off version while their Power Rangers just sat on a couch all episode laughing at it. Just a weird experiment that was really for older fans of the show.  3. "Island of Illusion" (Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers S1, Episodes 28-29)  The first season had its fair share of terrible, experimental ideas (fighting literal Frankenstein, the vagina monster), but the one that always stuck out to me the most was this two-parter. Here, Rita trapped the team on an island where they all had to fight off depressing memories otherwise they'd fade away forever. But the weirdest/worst part about all of this is there's a little person who only speaks in rhyme and plays the flute every time one of the Rangers goes through their whole thing. It's not like he was put there by Rita but he's just some mystical guy that likes to mess with people. This was one of the series' first forays into multi-part storytelling (after the famous "Green With Evil" story) without heavy use of overseas footage. It's all pretty much self-contained nonsense.  2. "Trouble By the Slice" (Power Rangers Turbo, Episode 22)  When Power Rangers Turbo villain Divatox loses her memory and takes a job at a pizza place, her henchman try and save her by distracting the Power Rangers with a monster created from the pizza place's logo. The villain, Mad Mike, speaks with a heavy, stereotypical Italian accent, uses pizzas to take control of their super cars (long story), and then proceeds to famously bake them into a pizza. Then a police alien comes to save the day with a stoplight and I still can't believe this was an episode. Turbo had episodes like this with even worse ideas like a bicycle that forces you to ride it forever, but this was the episode which inspired the list in the first place. At the end of the day, however, this was still just another average Power Rangers episode. 1. "The Rescue Mission" (Power Rangers Lost Galaxy, Episode 18)  But this entry wasn't an average episode of Power Rangers. When a distress signal reaches Terra Venture (the home base of the Lost Galaxy team), two of the Rangers are sent to check out a seemingly abandoned ship in search for a mystical book of some sort. Before long a spider monster begins abducting the team one by one in a low-rent Alien story. This episode was a dramatic departure from the rest of the series and featured almost no actual Ranger action. It was the best episode of the season, and the weirdest. In fact, it's the weirdest episode of Power Rangers. You should check this one out above all else. 
Power Rangers Month photo
Ninja Turtles, gambling, and pizza
One of the more popular throwaway quotes among Power Rangers diehards comes from the "Forever Red" episode of Wild Force. T.J., the Red Turbo Ranger, says "Did I ever tell you guys about the time I got baked into a giant...

Baywatch photo
Those ABS
I'm not sure anyone was actually looking forward to the Baywatch movie. We heard Dwayne Johnson and Zac Efron signed on to star, but it wasn't on anyone's radar until now. This first trailer for the upcoming reboot actually g...

Sega Films and TV photo
Sega Films and TV

Walking Dead producers working on Streets of Rage, Altered Beast adaptations


Part of Sega's major film and TV push
Dec 06
// Nick Valdez
Sega and Stories International announced plans to adapt more than 40 Sega properties (including the likes of Golden Axe and Crazy Taxi) a few years ago, but we haven't heard many rumblings until this year with films...
YJ S3 photo
YJ S3

Young Justice returning for a third season


Nov 08
// Nick Valdez
For what is truly a victory for fans after years of online support, WB Animation has confirmed that Young Justice is indeed returning for a season three. The series ran from 2010-2013, as part of Cartoon Network's DC Nation b...
The Simpsons photo
The Simpsons

You're not ready to watch 600 episodes of The Simpsons in a row


FXX's second "Every Simpsons Ever"
Sep 23
// Nick Valdez
When Fox first launched its spin-off channel, FXX, back in 2014, we were treated with an "Every Simpsons Ever" marathon. A week long event that showed the 552 episode long series in full. Now topping that is their second mara...
Black Lightning photo
Black Lightning

DC's Black Lightning coming to TV, but not on The CW


Sep 09
// Nick Valdez
As we've reiterated many times in the past, what WB/DC can't seem to do in their films they've been excelling at on TV. One major player has been producer Greg Berlanti, who pretty much reinvented DC on TV with Arrow, The Fla...
Jon Favreau photo
Jon Favreau

Jon Favreau will direct Seth MacFarlane's new space comedy show


Not a Star Wars parody
Aug 25
// Matthew Razak
I fell off the Family Guy band wagon after season five or six, but that doesn't mean I'm not excited for Seth MacFarlane's as-of-yet unnamed new science fiction comedy show coming to Fox. The live-action show will hopefu...
Legion Trailer photo
Legion Trailer

Check out the trailer for Fox and Marvel's Legion TV series


Jul 24
// Nick Valdez
With the X-Men series doing so well in theaters, Fox has been wanting to do a television series for quite a while. But since Marvel holds the rights to X-Men TV shows, any new project had to wait until the two compa...
LOTHT Trailer photo
LOTHT Trailer

Watch the Legends of the Hidden Temple movie trailer from San Diego Comic-Con


Coming to Nickelodeon this fall
Jul 24
// Nick Valdez
With Nickelodeon tapping into the 90s kid frenzy with The Splat and shows like Hey Arnold! getting a resolution, they have also been re-working some of their old properties. Case in point is Legends of the Hidden Temple. Base...
Stranger Things photo
Stranger Things

First trailer for Netflix's Stranger Things


Like old school Spielberg made a TV show
Jun 09
// Matthew Razak
When J.J. Abrams delivered Super 8 to us I reveled in its unabashed homage of classic Spielberg adventure films. I kind of wondered why it hadn't kicked off a bit of a renaissance of the 1980s supernatural film, but alas...
Voltron Trailer photo
Voltron Trailer

Here's a trailer for Netflix's Voltron: Legendary Defender


May 13
// Nick Valdez
Adding to the mass of nostalgia, and to Netflix's ever growing original programming, is Voltron: Legendary Defender. Studios have been trying to figure out what to do with Voltron for years with a movie in mind and a failed N...
Netflix photo
Netflix

Netflix announces Wet Hot American Summer: 10 Years Later


Do we all have our act together?
Apr 27
// Matthew Razak
Netflix brought back Wet Hot American Summer last year and it was pretty glorious. Evidently it was pretty glorious for them too as they've just announced a sequel... or is it a second season? I'm not sure. It's either t...
Power Rangers photo
Power Rangers

Here's the first image of Elizabeth Banks as Rita Repulsa


Green with evil
Apr 19
// Nick Valdez
I've gone back and forth over Lionsgate's upcoming Power Rangers movie too many times to count now. Everyone has specific fandoms they know too much about and one of mine happens to be the Power Rangers. So for the first time...
Supergirl Trailer photo
Supergirl Trailer

Check out this fun trailer for CBS' Supergirl/The Flash crossover


Mar 23
// Nick Valdez
If you're excited about the prospect of two of your favorite heroes teaming up on-screen without being mad at each other first like in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, the upcoming Supergirl and The Flash crossover ep...
Groening/Netflix photo
Groening/Netflix

The Simpsons' Matt Groening developing animated series for Netflix


Jan 18
// Nick Valdez
We're pretty big fans of The Simpsons here at Flixist. We've done lists, we've made every possible reference we could, and poke around our posts long enough and you'll find at least 65% of them have Simpsons gags as the lede ...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...