adventure

Indiana Jones 5 photo
Why did it have to be sequels?
When Disney bought LucasFilm pretty much everyone got excited about Star Wars, but they picked up another franchise that was in series need of saving: Indiana Jones. We all remember where we left that one, right? Space aliens...

Kumiko Trailer photo
Kumiko Trailer

First trailer for Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter


Dec 19
// Nick Valdez
After missing my chance to see it during SXSW earlier this year, Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter has been on my most anticipated list for quite some time. Based on the urban legend of a girl who mistook the movie Fargo for a tru...
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Flix for Short: Manly


By Adventure Time writer Jesse Moynihan
Sep 03
// Liz Rugg
Adventure Time writer and storyboard artist Jesse Moynihan teamed up with his brother Justin Moynihan to create this awesome Cartoon Hangover short film; Manly. In the short we meet Manly, the daughter of the emperor god of ...
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New trailer for Norwegian adventure movie Ragnarok


Jun 20
// Liz Rugg
Ragnarok is the story of archeologist Sigurd Svenden, a man who has always been enthralled with the Oseberg Viking ship, which contains a mysterious engraving in runes that says "Man knows little." When one of his archeology...
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Rumor: Indian Jones could go the way of Bond


Let the eternal casting debates begin
Mar 28
// Matthew Razak
Here's an interesting prospect: Indiana Jones going on forever because Harrison Ford isn't the only man who plays him. Latino Review has gotten word that this might be the next step for the franchise as the window for Ford to...
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Peter Jackson still intent on making Tintin 2


Dec 11
// Matthew Razak
The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn was everything Indian Jones and the Crystal Skull should have been. An action-packed throwback to adventure movies, full of fun and old school daring. The fact tha...
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Check out these awesome Mondo Pacific Rim posters


Jul 10
// Liz Rugg
Earlier this morning Entertainment Weekly debuted these awesome posters via Mondo for Guillermo del Toro's forthcoming monster-robot action movie Pacific Rim. There's four different posters by three different artists. The bla...
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Pacific Rim featurette shows off lots of robots, action


May 31
// Liz Rugg
As if you needed any more of a reason to be excited to see Guillermo del Toro's upcoming Summer action movie Pacific Rim, in this new behind the scenes featurette, the director talks about some of the crazy set design that w...
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Jonathan Rhys Meyers in talks for Star Wars: Episode VII?


May 21
// Hubert Vigilla
So far the actors who'll likely be in Star Wars: Episode VII are Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, and Harrison Ford, all of whom would reprise their roles from the original trilogy. They're still in negotiations, as far as anyone ...
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Peter Jackson's Hobbit back in production for pick ups


The cast and crew have reuinited for a few more weeks of shooting
May 20
// Hubert Vigilla
It's been a little while since we last heard about the next two Hobbit movies, The Desolation of Smaug and There and Back Again. Even though I had some issues with The Hobbit: An unexpected Journey (Matt, like the majority of...
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Paul Verhoeven wants to direct The Legend of Conan


May 20
// Logan Otremba
Arnold Schwarzenegger is 65 years old and Conan the Barbarian came out about 31 years ago. Schwarzenegger is also planning to reprise his role from the 1982 film. The Legend of Conan project currently has no director in mind,...

Review: Star Trek Into Darkness

May 15 // Nathan Hardisty
Star Trek Into DarknessDirector: J.J Abrams Release Date: May 9, 2013 (UK); May 15, 2013 (US IMAX), May 16, 2013 (US non-IMAX)Rating: 12A (UK), PG-13 (US) [embed]215165:39838:0[/embed] Into Darkness follows the next chapter of Captain Kirk (Chris Pine) and Spock (Zachary Quinto) of the Starship Enterprise. From the very beginning, Kirk's leadership is questioned and ripped open by some dramatic events. What happens, alongside all this, is an act of terrorism in London which plunges the entire Federation into alert and into full scale manhunt mode. Kirk is sent, off the record, to track down the man behind the attacks, John Harrison (Benedict Cumberbatch), and is soon thrown into inter-galactic political tensions, alien threats and sciency-wiency laser battles. Kirk must destroy the near unstoppable Harrison and uncover the darker truth underneath Starfleet Command. The plot honestly borrows quite heavily from the likes of The Avengers and The Dark Knight, with most of it revolving around the capture of a dangerous figure and the truth behind the destruction he brings to the world. The film decides to go into full-scale Empire Strikes Back-mode and has character conflicts, reversed relationships, action pieces full of genuinely terrifying sequences and some final beats that reveal the true emotional depth in Abrams' sci-fi tinged fingertips. The plot and general thrust of the film is simplistic, often predictable at times, and yet the evolution of the characters and enthralling pace just keeps you still second-guessing every single moment of this sugary roller-coaster ride. That's not to say the film is completely obsessed with superficial, fizzy detail. The lens flares, clean white atmosphere of the Enterprise and set design all create this gorgeous and often breathtaking scenery that holds a delicious place for Into Darkness to play out. Abrams' meshing of physical sets with digital artistry fuels more confidence that he has complete handle over what makes modern science-fiction truly buzz with excitement, injecting great hope into the claim that he'll make Star Wars work again. What really works, more than anything in the film, is its attention to detail with the characters. These are all treasured icons, and yet Abrams is somehow able to craft new emotional depth and collide new elements together to bring to light what makes Star Trek such a great avenue for exploring characters and relationships. I've never understood the 'bland' and 'unoriginal' critique of Abrams' work. The emotional pulp realism of Cloverfield, the ode to nostalgia in Super 8 and now the crucible of characters with Star Trek show an absolute commitment to humanity, feeling and history. Into Darkness delivers moments in which both Trekkies and everyone else will absolutely delight in equally; it is a simultaneous faithful and fresh vision, one that could be used in a quantum physics textbook as an analogy. That marriage of past and present is possibly the greatest  achievement of Abrams' career thus far. The film doesn't play fast and loose with its roots in any way, besides some small odd referencing that just seems to exist for referencing sake. The fresh up-scaling of the Enterprise is still incredibly faithful, the make-up and costumes carry that same intricate attention that the original series embodied, and it's, as a whole, a trip into what makes Star Trek wonderful. The action set-pieces are all engaging, though a few of these pieces may be a little bit flabby. The film's pace still keeps on that Warp throttle to create a deliciously dizzy sense of involving inertia that never lets your attention fade. Characters rip flaws in each other and shout out revelations over loud explosions and crackling phaser stun-ning shootouts. This is really a film that manages to get its exposition in both subtle and literally explosive means. Into Darkness has a fluid structure to that, just as it seems jarring or jumpy, manages to tie itself all together in succinct ways and develop itself further. Some entire sub-plots are resolved in five to seven words and Abrams manages to still make it all incredibly satisfying to the point of absolute glee. The centerpiece of this film, however, has to be its performances. Chris Pine shines as a Kirk under some impossible pressure, layering on some great showcase of his emotional flexibility and ability to fluidly move from snarky witticisms to full-on feelings. Zachary Quinto's Spock deals with existentialist drama and his entire character arc serves as the film's main thematic backdrop, allowing Quinto to show off his own brand of Spock that makes every single blink from him just make you believe he was born for the role. The way that Abrams manages to neatly insert a special piece of Star Trek history inside of Spock's character arc, to show off Quinto's juicy acting chops, is a testament to the true intelligence that rides inside the film. Benedict Cumberbatch's John Harrison is an incredible shock to the Star Trek system, creating a presence of absolute terror and awe in every scene he is in. If you're a fan of Sherlock you'll be surprised to see just how physical of an actor he can be, and just how scared you'll be to see his cheekbones appear. Zoe Saldana as Uhura is given some time to show off her absolute badassery, while newcomer Alice Eve stutters ever so slightly to find her place on board. Praise also has to be showered on Simon Pegg's Scotty who manages to keep the film in its most outlandish moments still grounded in heartfelt and bubbly territory. My only criticism is that Yelchin's Chekov and Cho's Sulu are relegated to 'sitting around' duty while the entire film takes place. It really feels focused on a handful of the crew members rather than feeling like an entire team's journey into the unknown. Into Darkness is a practically perfect Summer blockbuster. It's not exactly clever in its plot activity and some of its Trekkie references just sit around as mere tidbit mentions rather than actually meaning anything. Still, however, this is an absolutely Cumbersbash of a film. It's a rocket-propelled, stunning symphony of cracking action pieces, character crashes and moments of absolute jaw-dropping delight that just crackles with what a Summer blockbuster should be. Abrams delivers an entirely fresh leap out of the new Star Trek broth, managing to keep it exciting and buzzing with thrills galore. This is, so far, the best film of Summer and, aside from a few niggles from MIA characters, plot holes and pacing that is sometimes unforgiving, it's an otherwise incredible journey into the heart of Star Trek. Abrams, with these films, shows how he is the absolute auteur of blending the old-fashioned with the new-fashioned and shows off exactly what a treat we have in store for us when we get his offering of Star Wars fantasy.
Star Trek II Review photo
Set phasers to Cumberbatch
I thoroughly enjoyed the first Abrams Star Trek with all of its timeline meshing, cute references and lens flares. Into Darkness has been on my radar for a good while, and with Abrams now in the chair for Star ...

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David Goyer helming new Count of Monte Cristo adaptation


Mar 19
// Hubert Vigilla
Eventually I'll get to reading Alexandre Dumas's The Count of Monte Cristo. Eventually. In fact, I'm looking at my good, cheap 880-page Wordsworth Classics copy of it right now and I'm thinking, "Yup, I'd love to read this......
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New Robin Hood movie called Merry Men in development


Mar 04
// Hubert Vigilla
Robin Hood has been a staple of big screen adventure ever since the days of Douglas Fairbanks and Errol Flynn. The most recent high-profile Robin Hood movie was the 2010 Ridley Scott film starring Russell Crowe, which most pe...
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The Hobbit: There and Back Again delayed to December 2014


Peter Jackson's trilogy capper moves from summer to winter
Mar 01
// Hubert Vigilla
When The Hobbit went from a pair of movies to a trilogy, the original plan was to release The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey on December 12, 2012, The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug on December 13, 2013, and The Hobbit: There...
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UPDATE: Super Bowl TV spot for Star Trek Into Darkness


Tickets for early screenings on sale if you download the Star Trek App
Feb 05
// Hubert Vigilla
[UPDATE: In addition to getting tix to early screenings of Star Trek Into Darkness, downloading the Star Trek App will also give users an exclusive look at an extended cut of this Super Bowl spot. A little more information a...
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Super Bowl TV spot for The Lone Ranger


It could be worse, kemo sabe
Feb 04
// Hubert Vigilla
Now if memory serves, this TV spot for The Lone Ranger marked the transition from normal commercials to Super Bowl commercials. It was a long spot, essentially a trailer for people watching on TV, and you know what? It doesn...

Review: Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters

Jan 25 // Logan Otremba
[embed]212729:38795[/embed] Hansel & Gretel: Witch HuntersDirector: Tommy WirkolaRating: PG-13Release Date: January 25, 2013 Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters starts off similarly to the fairy tale and continues roughly where the fairy tale left off by having the siblings becoming orphans at a young age. Years later, they become bounty hunters of the witch-kind since they seem to kill them efficiently. Hansel (Jeremy Renner) and Gretel (Gemma Arterton) have become experts in their field seeing as they were able to kill a witch as children and somehow not die in the process. They are hired to find out what happened to some children, and the townspeople assume that it is the fault of witches and have gone the ways of Monty Python and the Holy Grail by seeing if a woman named Mina (Pihla Viitala) is a witch. A witch by the name of Muriel (Famke Janssen) has taken the children so that all witch-kind can become more powerful. Thus Hansel, Gretel, and a handful of sidekicks have to save the day and the children. The movie is strung together with an easy to follow plot and numerous actions scenes of the siblings hunting down witches. It does try to add a sprinkle of complexity to the story by adding in a toss away romance, and a back story to explain the siblings’ ability to hunt witches and what happens to their parents. It just doesn’t really add more to the overall story though; however it doesn’t detract from it either. The love story does strike a chord for me only because it was under developed and it ends in such an anti-climactic way. Between the backstory of why the siblings were orphaned and the love story, there is a whole good versus evil motif that tries to play out but ends up being underwhelming. It could have led to a potentially awesome witch versus witch action sequence, but it instead becomes a cop out to ending one of the story arcs. I will say that the movie does have an interesting world that is crossbreed of two time periods. This is highly recognizable in the weaponry that the siblings use in the movie because everything is basically modern technology re-imagined as 18th century technology. With them having access to modern day weapon look-alikes, it makes action sequences less complex to a degree. I would have liked to see them have flint-lock pistols and blunderbusses while trying to hunt down these witches because it would be more of a challenge for them. Still, these weapons and tools lead to some creative methods towards the eradication of the witches. When these action scenes play out though, it devolves into rapid cutting along with trying to keep up with whom is fighting who. The witches also added an interesting element to the world of the film. They appear as grotesque, and animalistic in nature. Gone is the iconic cackling laugh of a typical witch, and insert more growling and hissing in its stead. I rather liked the different approach to what is a witch. It was a nice change from the norm, and added the idea that there are many different types of witches. Despite the appaently harsh outlook of the movie, I found myself laughing throughout it and enjoying it as well. While the story is not exactly original and is predictable, it has pretty decent pacing and is enough to keep on paying attention. Renner and Arterton have some good chemistry between them when they are together on the screen, providing a well-represented brother and sister relationship. They are the stars of the movie, leading to the assortment of secondary and tertiary characters that are really not necessary. One more important secondary character, Ben (Thomas Mann), does not have much screen time. When he does though, the scene could have been easily done with him not there because his character doesn’t contribute much to the film. Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters is very much a run-of-the-mill action-adventure movie. We got the interesting action scenes, creative methods of witch extermination, and a pretty creative, dark twist on the original fairy tale. It isn't awful, but it isn't even remotely a cinematic masterpiece.
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This is not your parents' fairy tale
I like it when a movie skews the usual perspective of a concept, genre, or an idea that the general public feels to be a certain way. Remember growing up and reading fairy tales like“Hansel and Gretel"? Did you ever bel...

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Trailer: Mud


Jan 18
// Nick Valdez
Mud stars Matthew McConaughey as he tells stories to young children. Then bounty hunters show up, and those stories seem more like reality. I may have over-simplified the premise, but I'm intrigued by the fact that I can do ...
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Trailer: Trance


Jan 10
// Liz Rugg
Danny Boyle's newest venture, entitled Trance, looks like a good old fashioned psychological thriller mixed with an art heist movie. Starring James McAvoy, Rosario Dawson and Vincent Cassel, Trance follows an art thief (McAv...

Book: Tarzan - The Centennial Celebration

Dec 17 // Hubert Vigilla
Tarzan - The Centennial Celebration is the size of two vintage pulp magazines. Tarzan was a character so much of his time. In his foreword to the book, Tarzan actor Ron Ely situates the character smack in the middle of 1912. A century ago, travel was treacherous and difficult. The comforts of society and its technological innovations would be rivaled by the primordial tumult of the jungle wild. These overgrown and unmapped places housed mysteries -- intelligent apes, lost cities, unknown (and therefore likely cannibalistic) tribes. That's just part of the zeitgeist that gave birth to Tarzan, though. There's also the nascent superhero model built in the pulp adventures of the early 20th century, with characters like Tarzan and John Carter paving the way for Philip Wylie's Gladiator, Robert E. Howard's Conan, Lee Falk's The Phantom, and Doc Savage (though created by three people, the character is best linked to the mind of co-creator Lester Dent). And then there's Burroughs himself, and 1912 was an ideal year for him to make a living for as a writer, something that seems more difficult now, especially given the pressure to do this sort of thing while young. Burroughs turned 37 in 1912, the year he wrote and published his first John Carter and Tarzan stories. Before this, he'd been unhappy and/or unsuccessful at his other jobs: stenography department manager at Sears, patent medicine salesman, proprietor of a stationary store, and railroad policeman. (Today, all of those occupations would probably pay better than full-time fiction writer.) After covering Burroughs's early life and first writings, Griffin steers the reader through The Centennial Celebration book by book in chronological order. There's a basic plot synopsis for each Tarzan tale accompanied by some excellent full-color art by people like Neal Adams, Frank Frazetta, Joe Kubert, and Boris Vallejo. A few original Burroughs sketches are included as well. The Tarzan synopses are followed by some publication history, which explores how Burroughs negotiated payments with various competing pulps and leveraged his growing popularity to his advantage. There's a certain anarchic absurdity to the later Tarzan books that is absolutely incredible Along the way, Griffin takes time to dispel a few Tarzan misconceptions. For one, the Tarzan of the Burroughs stories was well-versed in many languages rather than a grunting, monosyllabic savage. He could speak English, Mangani (ape language), German, Arabic, Swahili, French, Dutch, and much more. Essentially, if the story called for it, you could count on Tarzan to know it. The Centennial Celebration even includes an ape-to-English and English-to-ape glossary, showing Burroughs's dedication to world building. (If only there was more time -- there would be an entire section of this piece written in ape.) The MGM movie version of Tarzan (played by Weissmuller) defined many public perceptions about the character, which explains the common idea of Tarzan as a dim yet noble brute. This frustrated Burroughs to no end and led him to produce his own Tarzan films with Herman Brix in the lead. The Centennial Celebration details some of MGM's studio tactics to limit the success of the Brix films. The most interesting misconceptions about Tarzan stemming from the films involves two supposed Tarzanisms: "Me Tarzan, you Jane" and the all-purpose ape-language word "umgawa." Neither of these appeared in Burroughs's books. ("Umgawa" is clearly ape for "Play it again, Sam" and "Elementary, my dear Watson.") As Burroughs progressed with his Tarzan books, his imagination seemed to become unbridled, hurtling Tarzan into undiscovered cities, sending the hero to fight against the Nazis, and even placing him in fantastical situations. In the tenth Tarzan book, Tarzan and the Ant Men, Tarzan teams up with the diminutive race of humans known as the Minunians, a clear riff on the Lilliputians from Gulliver's Travels. (And of course Tarzan speaks Minunian.) There's also an adventure in the world of Pellucidar, a land in the hollow interior of the Earth that can only be accessed by a hole in the North Pole. While in Pellucidar, Tarzan (who obviously speaks the language) battles pterodactyls and other prehistoric creatures. Not only does Tarzan conquer the wild while traipsing between the savage world and the civilized world, he battles the unknown, the unimaginable, the unreal. Waiting for Tarzan in the 21st century And I suppose it's this absolute openness to the Tarzan tales that makes me wonder why there hasn't been a 21st century attempt at a Tarzan film. Here's a character whose fingerprints are all over superhero comics and imaginative fiction -- from the perambulations of Spider-Man, to the primate obsessions in DC Comics (e.g., the gorilla cities of The Flash), to the homage/pastiche in Alan Moore's Tom Strong and Warren Ellis's Planetary. The character is still well known, and I'm pretty sure children still know what a Tarzan yell sounds like and could mimic one if pressed. Though maybe Tarzan would have suffered a box office fate similar to his fellow Burroughs centenarian, John Carter. I wonder if there's something distinctly early-20th-century about Tarzan in the same way there's something so late-19th-century about Captain Nemo and Phileas Fogg. Is there something about the foundling in the wild becoming a hero that doesn't transfer to the heroes of the 21st century? We prefer our orphans in human homes, maybe. Even if Tarzan is a kind of relic, there's a certain kind of spirit that seems ripe for exploration. If the Disney Tarzan could use skateboarding to help send the character around the trees (which sounds even more quintessentially 90s when I type it out), why not parkour on the jungle floor and up in the canopies of trees? There's less and less to explore in the wild, which is definitely different than the world Burroughs lived in. And travel is more convenient -- daring hipster tourists with the right vaccinations and a little know-how could probably tackle the jungle with some help from local guides. If lost in the jungle, they'd only need to listen for an engine somewhere while following the advice of Les Stroud and Bear Grylls. (Me Tarzan... better drink my own piss?) But there seems to be room for Tarzan in the 21st century. Perhaps it just needs a kick of Burroughs-like imagination to make it happen.
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Scott Tracy Griffin looks at 100 incredible years of Tarzan
Last month, Titan Books released Tarzan - The Centennial Celebration by Scott Tracy Griffin, a massive full-color coffee table book that looks at 100 years of Tarzan. It's a gorgeous book, and perfect whether you're an avid f...

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Peter Jackson working on Tintin sequel for 2015


Dec 13
// Hubert Vigilla
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey comes out tomorrow, but Peter Jackson isn't ready to slow down. He's already shooting a new movie next year: a sequel to Steven Spielberg's The Adventures of Tintin. Jackson served as co...

Trailer: The Lone Ranger

Dec 11 // Hubert Vigilla
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Newest trailer for Gore Verbinski's expensive western epic starring Johnny Depp
A new trailer has just come out for The Lone Ranger, Gore Verbinski's big-budget action-western starring Johnny Depp, Armie Hammer, Tom Wilkinson, and Helena Bonham Carter. While I don't think it's as good as the first trail...

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13-minute featurette on The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey


New footage of Peter Jackson and company in this behind-the-scenes video
Dec 07
// Hubert Vigilla
We're one week away from The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, and if you're looking for some new footage to get you hyped, here's a 13-minute featurette for the film via Warner Bros. Belgium. It's got loads of new stuff, inclu...
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New Hobbit TV spot and Entertainment Weekly covers


Dec 06
// Hubert Vigilla
For some reason it hasn't quite dawned on me that I'll be seeing The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey next week at midnight. The original Lord of the Rings Trilogy came out when I was in college, and I remember going to the mid...
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Teaser: The Monkey King


Donnie Yen's Chinese odyssey looks like a bogus Journey to the West
Dec 04
// Hubert Vigilla
Yesterday we shared the new poster for The Monkey King from director Soi Cheang, a forthcoming Chinese fantasy film based on characters from the book Journey to the West. The film stars Donnie Yen, Chow Yun-fat, Aaron Kwok, ...
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New Hobbit TV spot has brief glimpses of Smaug


Dec 03
// Hubert Vigilla
The latest TV spot for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey features a few scant shots of Smaug. And I mean very scant. He just swoops in and destroys stuff, sort of like what he did in the Star Trek Into Darkness poster this m...
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New poster for The Monkey King starring Donnie Yen


Dec 03
// Hubert Vigilla
In the comments of the 12 best Donnie Yen fights, hbomb and I mentioned that we hadn't heard anything about The Monkey King in a while. It's an IMAX 3D fantasy epic directed by Soi Cheang and based off characters from Wu Chen...
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The Hobbit midnight IMAX posters; stream the film score


Nov 30
// Hubert Vigilla
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey will be out in two weeks, if you can believe it. And so the hype machine continues with a new TV spot and lots of other keen things. First of all, if you're attending a midnight 3D IMAX scre...






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