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Marvel photo
First looks galore
Netflix came out swinging at this year's Comic Con. Not only did they drop a trailer for the upcoming Luke Cage movie, but also teasers for Iron Fist and The Defenders. As you may or may not know the latter of those...

Netflix Flixtape photo
Netflix Flixtape

Netflix launches Flixtape, which is part-playlist and part-mixtape

The first track is most the important
Jul 21
// Hubert Vigilla
Making a good mixtape can be a complex artform. The mix reflects your personal taste and expresses unspoken feelings while ultimately trying to appeal to the recipient. Then there are the unspoken rules of the mixtape, right?...
MoviePass pricing photo
MoviePass pricing

MoviePass unveils new pricing tiers, older members can sign up for them in September

Should have done this in the first place
Jul 13
// Hubert Vigilla
MoviePass changed their pricing and business model recently, and in a way that made people upset. I wrote the other day that they deserved to lose customers and goodwill over this. Yesterday, MoviePass unveiled a new tiered-p...

Unlimited Facepalms: MoviePass deserves to lose customers and goodwill

Jul 11 // Hubert Vigilla
If you go on the MoviePass website right now, they still tout $30 as the starting price for service. Anecdotally, it seems as if the service changes weren't done across the board for all users but only affected some MoviePass users. This included early adopters who may have been with the company since it started in 2011. Meanwhile, other customers who may be newer to the service may not be subject to these restrictive or expensive rate hikes and service changes. New users, for instance, may get the one movie every 24 hours version of MoviePass service rather than having to choose between the $40/$50 package and the $99 package. (Also, $99? Guys, that's a passive-aggressive $100.) Then again, I'm relatively new to the program. I've only been using MoviePass since March. Fellow Flixist writer Alec Kubas-Meyer has had MoviePass longer than I have, though as of the weekend, he had not received an email about service changes. This makes me wonder if the number of movies seen during each billing cycle played a part in who got the email of doom, but that's purely speculation at this point. Based on what I've seen online, it seems like long-term MoviePass users were given no option to grandfather their previous plan despite their loyalty to the company over the years. It was the same limited menu of options: pay more for basically less, pay more than double for additional formats, or leave. Lolo Loves Films has been especially critical about these MoviePass changes, with many of their tweets devoted to this issue. MoviePass contacted Lolo Loves Films and discussed the matter with them by phone. Sadly the representative they spoke to offered no answers about reverting to the old service, no option of older users keeping their previous service, or any other matters regarding these pricing and services changes. They simply listened, offered gentle apologies, and that was it. That's all the customer service reps can do, really, since this wasn't their decision and they're probably just as bummed out as the customers that the higher-ups have messed up the company. Even though they listened, it doesn't seem like MoviePass cares. This isn't the first time the company has implemented changes that upset customers. Ryan Scafuro, producer of the documentary Bending Steel, mentioned that he'd been a MoviePass member at the beginning, when the company allowed customers to see one movie per day without the 24-hour restriction. The 24-hour restriction started in October 2013, at which point Scafuro dropped MoviePass. "That may be a petty reason but it really annoyed me and seemed like a shady move," Scafuro explained. "Now [with the new changes] it doesn't seem worth it at all." "I was a pretty early adopter to the program (I think I signed up in 2012)," Scafuro said. "When I called customer service I expected the rep to offer me some sort of grandfather clause. He was basically like 'I can refund your subscription,' which seemed like a tactless 'f**k you' seeing that they were still in the early stages of operation." Even though MoviePass in its current (and fallen) form could potentially offer savings, there's the principle of it all. The changes have been forced on customers without their input or a dialogue, and the changes have been applied unevenly, targeting certain people rather than all of the customer base. It seems unfair because, well, it's unfair. (I think Yogi Berra said that.) Had MoviePass issued a customer survey of some kind across the board prior to implementing any changes, there'd be more goodwill from customers. There'd be a sense of choice and involvement in the service moving forward, a service that many of these customers liked. Even just a little bit of input would go a long way to easing the change. Instead, MoviePass has basically said, "Here are your choices. Now s**t or get off the pot, kiddo." There's also an issue of the limitations in the new services and the immediate psychological response to having your choices taken away from you very suddenly. I don't care about 3D movies, so paying $5 more to see only six movies a month seems like a limitation on my ability to choose. That's not a good way of maintaining customer loyalty, which is why I can't recommend the service to anyone anymore. As of this writing, MoviePass has yet to publicly respond to the criticism it's received online and from individual members about these price and service changes. On July 5th, they posted a letter to customers on their blog, which was received with overwhelming negativity. Just read them comments. I sent an email to customer service over the weekend when I canceled, though I don't expect to get a response. If there's one thing that seems clear in all this, it's that MoviePass doesn't care what you think anyway.
MoviePass facepalm photo
Roll out of service changes poorly done
As we noted yesterday, MoviePass is raising prices and changing its service plan for select customers. Prior to these changes, MoviePass allowed members to see one 2D movie at participating theaters every 24 hours for as low ...

MoviePass changes photo
MoviePass changes

MoviePass upsets customers with price increase and plan changes

Select members get screwed
Jul 10
// Hubert Vigilla
MoviePass was bound to change when Netflix co-founder Mitch Lowe became CEO in June. Founded in 2011, MoviePass allowed customers to pay as little as $30 a month to see a 2D movie every 24 hours at participating theaters. (Mo...
Stranger Things photo
Stranger Things

First trailer for Netflix's Stranger Things

Like old school Spielberg made a TV show
Jun 09
// Matthew Razak
When J.J. Abrams delivered Super 8 to us I reveled in its unabashed homage of classic Spielberg adventure films. I kind of wondered why it hadn't kicked off a bit of a renaissance of the 1980s supernatural film, but alas...
Voltron Trailer photo
Voltron Trailer

Here's a trailer for Netflix's Voltron: Legendary Defender

May 13
// Nick Valdez
Adding to the mass of nostalgia, and to Netflix's ever growing original programming, is Voltron: Legendary Defender. Studios have been trying to figure out what to do with Voltron for years with a movie in mind and a failed N...
Punisher photo
One batch, two batch
If you watched this last season of Daredevil you know that someone finally nailed Punisher. Jon Bernthal absolutely stole the show with his slightly psychotic and entirely compelling portrayal of Frank Castle. People lov...

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Netflix announces Wet Hot American Summer: 10 Years Later

Do we all have our act together?
Apr 27
// Matthew Razak
Netflix brought back Wet Hot American Summer last year and it was pretty glorious. Evidently it was pretty glorious for them too as they've just announced a sequel... or is it a second season? I'm not sure. It's either t...

Tribeca Review: Rebirth

Apr 26 // Nick Valdez
RebirthDirector: Karl MuellerRating: NRRelease Date: April 17, 2016 (limited) Rebirth stars Fran Kranz as Kyle, a husband and father who's lives a well off life. But he's been a bit unfulfilled lately as his college dreams have been pushed aside in favor of his family and a boring desk job. When his old college buddy Zack (Adam Goldberg) invites him to a retreat for a weekend, and won't stop talking about how great this "Rebirth" seminar is, Kyle decides to go for it. But Kyle soon realizes that "Rebirth" might be a more twisted program then they initially let on. Despite their mantra of "You're free to leave whenever you want" escaping the seminar proves tough.  Rebirth is a Netflix Original production and the choices within reflect that. It's full of these quirky little details that releasing on streaming services would help it get away with. The film is open to to risks and, more often than not, those risks pay off. Unfortunately, the entertainment is too reliant on those little quirks to succeed. The film is fairly predictable and you can pretty much guess how it's going to get from point A to B, and because of this, the little detours every now and again are that much more interesting. They're often non-sequiturs, so as to not derail the main plot, so these little jokes feel more refreshing. For example, Kyle ends going through several different types of seminar rooms during his escape attempt. Each room has its own theme with the ultimate goal of keeping Kyle around, so the film spends time with each room and plays around with how they'd try and brainwash Kyle. Each of these moments are inconsequential, but fun.  These little touches may not be needed, but they help elevate the rest of the film. It's dark blend of humor and chills turns out to be the perfect take on its premise. And its loose structure of stumbling on room after room, along with Kranz's key performance, amplifies the plot's inherent frustration. You'll start feeling frustration as Kyle continues to fail and seeing how goofy some of the rooms and Rebirth's denizens are will only make you angrier. So while they're inconsequential to the plot, it helps the film's overall vibe and tension. What also helps is just how game everyone is with the film. Each actor turns in a kooky performance as the know exactly what kind of film Rebirth wants to be.  I love Adam Goldberg, and it's always a pleasure to see him pop up in a project. He's slightly underutilized here, but seeing as he steals every scene he's in that's probably best. Fran Kranz does a great job leading the film along, however. His neurotic, terrified performance gives the premise the credibility and weight it needs even when the seminar doesn't seem as dangerous as he's perceiving it to be. Rebirth is also shot in an interesting way with long periods of stillness coupled with short bursts of following Kyle through the dingy house the seminar is in. We're effectively put into Kyle's shoes and when the film truly goes off the rails, we're along for the ride.  Rebirth isn't a bad film at all, but it's not necessarily great either. But it's got such a well crafted personality and it doesn't take itself too seriously. It's a fun little romp that doesn't overstay its welcome. You won't exactly feel a rebirth afterwards, but you won't die either. 
Rebirth Tribeca Review photo
Cult of personality
Festivals are a great time to try out films you would never consider in your personal time. Like a Netflix queue, the options are endless and each film only has a short premise and cast listing to get our attention. Since m...

Bright photo

Netflix drops $90M on David Ayer, Max Landis, and Will Smith film Bright

Mar 22
// Nick Valdez
Whoa, this is getting serious. With Netflix slowly taking over all home media as we know it with its original programming, Adam Sandler deals, and decades in the making sequels, it seems its heading for the big time. While it...

Paramount drops The Little Prince, Netflix picks it back up

-insert inherent ska joke here-
Mar 18
// Geoff Henao
I've never actually read The Little Prince, but I know fans keep their memories of the 1943 French novella in the warm places of their hearts. Despite a stellar cast comprised of Jeff Bridges (The Giver), Paul Rudd (Captain A...
Pee Wee Herman Netflix photo
Pee Wee Herman Netflix

Watch the trailer for Pee-wee's Big Holiday, coming to Netflix in March

Faster, Pee-wee! Kill! Kill!
Feb 16
// Hubert Vigilla
After years in production hell (and a successful Broadway stage show), Paul Reuben's manic manchild Pee-wee Herman is back again an all new adventure thanks to Netflix. And it looks sort of like Pee-wee's Big Adventure. ...

Why the Coen brothers' Hail, Caesar! should have been a series instead of a movie (SPOILERS)

Feb 09 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220337:42831:0[/embed] Both Tasha Robinson at The Verge and Lesley Coffin at The Mary Sue mentioned in their reviews that Hail, Caesar! feels more like a TV pilot than a film, which is accurate. The film introduces a rich cast of characters, many of which could have carried their own films about the trials and tribulations of 1950s Hollywood. There's Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin), a studio head and fixer dealing with the difficult day-to-day grind of running Capitol Pictures and managing his talent. There's Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), a leading man who's kidnapped by a group of subversive Communist screenwriters while he is shooting a swords and sandals epic about Jesus told from the Roman point of view. There's Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), a singing-cowboy who's trying to be turned into a debonair leading man. There's DeeAnna Moran (Scarlett Johansson), a pregnant starlet trying to figure out how to keep her situation under wraps. There's Thora Thacker and Thessaly Thacker (both played by Tilda Swinton in increasingly ridiculous hats), twin sisters and rival gossip columnists. There's Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), a high-toned director of stylish pictures. And there's Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), a tap dancing leading man who looks great in a sailor outfit. It's almost like Joel and Ethan Coen had about six or seven ideas about different Hollywood movies they wanted to do and just decided to jam them all together in one picture. It's no wonder everything feels just half-developed with that ensemble; at a certain point, the characters felt more like cameos, and Hail, Caesar! feels less like a story with actual stakes and more like a pretext for fun gags (one of the standouts is a theological debate over a script), amusing scenes (Hobie killing time before a film premiere by twirling a lasso around), and extended homages to Hollywood's past (overt nods to On the Town, ditto Esther Williams water ballets). When I think of The Big Lebowski, it feels like a film even though it's so packed with colorful characters, but Hail, Caesar! feels like the start of something rather than a self-contained story. I'm obviously in no position to tell the Coen brothers' how to do what they do, but in my head, I could envision Hail, Caesar! as a six-episode miniseries on Netflix, with each episode running 45 minutes. The entire series would still, like the film, take place in just one day, but each episode would focus on a particular plot in the film anchored to a character or group of characters. One episode could cover Baird's kidnapping and the whole Communist conspiracy subplot. One episode would be about the dueling Thacker sisters trying to out-scoop each other. Another about DeAnna's dilemma, what it was like to be an over-scrutinized starlet at that time, and how she winds up with Jonah Hill's character by the end. (About 95% of Hill's total screentime is in the trailers and commercials.) Another episode could be about Lorentz and Burt, their possible clandestine relationship, and the experience of closeted gay talent in Hollywood during this era. Hobie's episode would be a comedy of manners as he drifts between high and low genres as well as casual and formal situations. And of course, there'd be an episode about Mannix and his choice of being the fixer of a studio or accepting a better and easier position at Lockheed. Each episode would occasionally intersect with other episodes, presenting the same scene, but possibly offering a different point of view of that scene. (Think Elephant or Jackie Brown.) The constant in every show, however, would be Mannix. He's the moral core and center of the studio, and without him these lives would fall apart. The final episode, which would be Mannix's episode, would cover all of the things he did in the day that weren't in the other episodes, like the bookending confessions, his theological meeting, his big decision about the Lockheed gig, etc. It would also give a chance to see more interactions with his wife (a wasted Allison Pill), his secretary (Heather Goldenhersh), and an editor (Frances McDormand). The Coen brothers have shown a knack for aesthetic shapeshifting, and had Hail, Caesar! been a series instead of a movie, they could have made each episode have its own style and mood befitting the character and plot being covered. Most importantly, though, the characters would all be given their due and have their stories told--plots rather than subplots, an ensemble cast rather than a collection of cameos. We're in a golden age of television, streaming, and episodic storytelling. It would have been great to see the Coen brothers pay homage to that waning golden age of Hollywood in a serialized medium that is now coming into its own.
Hail, Caesar! as a series photo
The Golden Age of Hollywood: The Show
The Coen brothers' Hail, Caesar! is not a bad film. The Coen brothers are such expert craftsmen that they are incapable of making a bad movie. They're always at least watchable. If you look at their filmography, they have mad...

Netflix Five: Under-the-radar horror films

Feb 09 // Sean Walsh
[embed]220351:42826:0[/embed] The Veil (2016)Director: Phil JoanouRating: 3/5 From the director of the totally excellent Punisher: Dirty Laundry fan film with a script by Robert Ben Garant of Reno 911 fame, The Veil features Jessica Alba, Tom Jane, and American Horror Story alum Lily Rabe. The film tells the story of the lone survivor of the group suicide of a cult known as Heaven's Veil (Rabe) led Jim Jones Jacobs (Jane). A young woman (Alba) and her film crew convince Rabe's character to return to the scene of the suicide and help them find footage that was shot at the compound but never found. Shocking nobody, things get spooky and bodies start piling up fairly quickly. The Veil wasn't anything special, but it was okay. Tom Jane's charasmatic cult leader was well-acted and certainly the best performance in the film, similar to Michael Parks' role in Red State. Alba's character feels awfully underdeveloped and Rabe is there to more or less help move the plot along. One saving grace was that the filmmakers made the smart decision of not making The Veil a found footage film (which it was originally going to be!) , despite the importance placed on film footage and even the usage of footage to help tell the story. While it isn't groundbreaking by any stretch, had they made it into a found footage film it would be just another addition to a sea of mediocre films. Bottom line: you can certainly do worse than The Veil. [embed]220351:42827:0[/embed] Kristy (2013)Director: Oliver BlackburnRating: 4/5 Most home invasion thrillers usually take place at, well, homes, so the fact that Kristy took place on a college campus was a refreshing change of pace. The plot is as simple as they come: a girl stays on campus over Thanksgiving break and finds herself terrorized by three people in hoodies and masks that keep calling her 'Kristy' (her name is Justine). See? Simple. The trope of 'victim fights back' is as old as they come, but it's especially effective in this film. Once things get going, which blissfully doesn't take all that long, they move at a fast pace all the way up to the end. The simplicity and execution of Kristy offsets the edgy social media motivations of the killers, who really didn't need any explanation beyond their rants about 'Kristy.' The three masked intruders in The Strangers had zero backstory and it was far more effective that way. That said, Kristy is an excellent addition to the home invasion genre.  [embed]220351:42828:0[/embed] Butcher Boys (2012)Director: Duane Graves Rating: N/A (didn't finish) A girl and her friends end up on the wrong side of the tracks and in the sights of a group of bad boy leather jacket cannibals. Yeehaw. I got about halfway into Butcher Boys before giving up the ghost and moving on to pulling out my brains like the Egyptians did during mummification, as it was considerably more preferable than continuing this film. The big problem is that instead of taking characters akin to Leatherface and his family out of the country and into an urban setting, we get a bunch of uninteresting bad boys with a taste for flesh. I recently read Shane McKenzie's Muerte Con Carne and standing next to that, Butcher Boys was bland and boring. If I had to give what I watched a rating, it would be echh/5. [embed]220351:42830:0[/embed] Contracted (2013)Director: Eric EnglandRating: 5/5  Contracted is a cautionary tale about going to parties and drinking too much like Requiem for a Dream is one to doing hard drugs. Poor Samantha drinks too much at a party to forget about her ex-girlfriend and is date raped. What Samantha passes off as a hangover proves to be far more grave and in the days that follow the party, she finds herself having contracted (do you see what I did there?) a very, very heinous case of the STD blues. This film is not for the weak of heart as it is essentially a grotesque variant of torture porn as we spend the admittedly short run time (clocking in at a paltry 78 minutes) watching Samantha fall apart. The effects are spectacular, gross enough to give Tom Savini pause, and they really make it apparent that Sam is really not in for a good time. Ultimately, Contracted feels like the first in what could easily be a trilogy (and with a second installment out, it certainly seems likely), showing us at length the prologue to an epidemic, something that usually only takes up a small piece of a single film. After having watched both Contracted and its sequel, I am certainly excited to see where they take it next. [embed]220351:42829:0[/embed] Frankenstein's Army (2013)Director: Richard Raaphorst Rating: 5/5  As I touched on above, found footage films can be really hit or miss. Fortunately for me, as I was incredibly hungry to see this film based on the DVD art alone, Frankenstein's Army was awesome. Frankenstein's Army has another fairly simple premise: during World War II, some Russian soldiers respond to a distress call in Germany and find themselves neck-deep in Silent Hill body horror insanity with little to no hope of escape. While the movie may not be the Citizen Kane of the horror genre, the designs of the titular 'army' alone would've gotten this a 5/5 with me. The monsters are absolutely horrific and unlike anything I've seen in live-action movies. I don't want to even try to describe them, lest I ruin the surprise as each one rears its ugly head. My only problem with this film is the fact that the footage looks like it was shot with a modern video camera as opposed to something that would've been used during WWII. Considering how awesome the monsters looked, I can't imagine it would've been too hard for editors to age the film so make it look era-appropriate. Despite that one issue, Frankenstein's Army is up there with The Children and Event Horizon in my personal favorite horror films. 
Netflix 5: horror films photo
Give new meaning to "Netflix and chill"
Netflix Five is a quick and dirty look at five films or shows that we've watched and want to either recommend or condemn for our readers to help make their trip through the instant queue a little less overwhelming. Not every ...

Groening/Netflix photo

The Simpsons' Matt Groening developing animated series for Netflix

Jan 18
// Nick Valdez
We're pretty big fans of The Simpsons here at Flixist. We've done lists, we've made every possible reference we could, and poke around our posts long enough and you'll find at least 65% of them have Simpsons gags as the lede ...
House of Cards photo
House of Cards

House of Cards trailer makes me want to watch

So this show is good, huh?
Jan 11
// Matthew Razak
Please don't kill me, but I haven't watched a single episode of House of Cards. It's not that I don't want to, it's just that I haven't. Yes, I've probably been watching a bunch of other shows that aren't as good, and I keep ...
The Get Down photo
The Get Down

Watch the trailer for The Get Down, Baz Luhrmann's Netflix series on disco and the birth of hip-hop

Recreating New York City in the 1970s
Jan 08
// Hubert Vigilla
There's a lot of romance surrounding New York in the 1970s even though it wasn't necessarily the place you'd want to live. Crime, poverty, economic collapse, garbage strikes, tenement arson to collect insurance money. Then ag...
Hidden Sequel photo
Quite a title
When Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon first hit the scene it changed the world. All manner of wire fu technology took Hollywood by storm and eventually led to a second boom of big budget kung fu flicks. After that trend died do...

Lost in Space photo
Lost in Space

Netflix making a Lost in Space series

Pun about being found
Nov 23
// Matthew Razak
I've never quite gotten the love for Lost in Space. Aside from the greatest robot ever the series always felt bland when I caught it on reruns. Then again, I thought the film adaptation was actually kind of interesting so tak...

Netflix drops a Very Murray Christmas poster

Sadly, Scrooged still not available
Nov 09
// Matthew Razak
As everyone knows Bill Murray has already starred in one of the greatest modern Christmas films of all time, Scrooged. That's not enough for him, however. He's about to hit us up with another. Netflix's A Very Murray Christma...

FlixList: The Ten Best Horror Films on Netflix Instant (2015 Edition)

Oct 26 // Nick Valdez
Honorable Mentions: Let the Right One In, American Mary, Children of the Corn, The Lazarus Effect, The Sacrament, the V/H/S series, Teeth, Starry Eyes, Stage Fright, Vampire in Brooklyn, Odd Thomas, We Are What We Are [embed]218490:41925:0[/embed] Tucker and Dale vs. Evil Although Tucker and Dale is more of a parody of the horror genre (as teens find themselves in precarious violent situations while the two try to save them), that doesn't mean it isn't full of the same suspense or gore you'd expect. If gruesome deaths are your horror bag, then this film's for you. If not, there are quite a lot of laughs mined from those gross moments.  [embed]218490:42673:0[/embed] The Babadook Not all horror monsters are the same. While some are in your face and some are barely noticed at all, Babadook somehow creates a truly terrifying monster without showing up at all. This magnetic thriller all takes place within a fever dream of a mother who's pushed too far and just wants to punch her annoying child in the mouth. It's not perfect, but it's too different to ignore.  [embed]218490:41928:0[/embed] All Cheerleaders Die With a name like All Cheerleaders Die, you'd be forgiven for writting off this neat little flick. It's not as overtly sexual as the name implies, and is fact a nice twist on that pulpy horror "sexy beast" gimmick. It's not until the finale kicks in that you really see what kind of horror film it is, but it's worth it.  [embed]218490:41930:0[/embed] Scream Out of all the slasher films on Netflix Instant, I'd have to pick Scream as my favorite. Maybe it's because this one stars Neve Campbell too, but it's the first film I remember utilizing the meta narrative that's exploited so much today. It was a hipster horror film before hipster horror was even a thing. A film you can ironically and un-ironically enjoy. Also let me just mention Neve Campbell one more time. So good. [embed]218490:42674:0[/embed] Monster Squad It's certainly not the best, or the funniest, or even a horror film, but I just like it so much I had to put it here. Plus Monster Squad reminds me of Space Jam because it sounds like the result of smashing the Monstars and the Tune Squad together.  [embed]218490:42675:0[/embed] A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night The most intriguing entry on this list by far, A Girl Walks is incredibly chilling. It's superbly put together with its black and white tone creating a stark eerineess that never once lets up. Despite its horror premise, it's a film that can be seen throughout the year with no problems. It's a work of art, and it's a brilliant debut from writer/director Ana Lily Amirpour. Blending new age with a sort of vintage style, yet still rotted in her Iranian culture, A Girl Walks is just something that needs to be experienced.  [embed]218490:41933:0[/embed] Battle Royale In Battle Royale, a group of Japanese schoolmates are randomly chosen each year to kill each other in order to appease the adults. Although I'm no longer at the age where this premise has a direct effect on me, it's still chilling. I guess if you're not into foreign films, just watch The Hunger Games for a lighter take on this idea. As long as the horrific themes sink in, you're golden.  [embed]218490:42676:0[/embed] Creep I love me some Mark Duplass, but I had no idea what to think when Creep was first revealed during SXSW. It's a found footage thriller where one man is hired to film Duplass' character Josef as he plans as series of events for his unborn son. But as the film progresses, you realize Josef's a bit more unhinged than he lets on (putting an ad on Craigslist should've been the tipoff, really). This film's only really horror thanks to the icky feeling you get while you watch, but isn't that just the best? [embed]218490:41931:0[/embed] Rosemary's Baby This film continues to give me nightmares to this day. Whether it's a fear of children, of women, of punishment for sexual desires, a paranoia of those around me, or the Devil itself, Baby taps into all of them and cripples me each time I see it. In fact, I'm getting goosebumps right now just thinking about it. And it's not just the horror aspects, Baby is just a damn good film. With an outstanding performance from Mia Farrow, excellent set design, and pulsing score, it's a film I'd recommend to everyone above all else.  [embed]218490:42677:0[/embed] The Guest From the awesome duo who brought you You're Next (which is on Netflix too!) comes The Guest, a film so good I couldn't stop talking about it for weeks after its release. A thriller with a killer soundtrack, great acting, a fantastic finale, and with its tongue planted firmly in cheek. Few horror films, or films in general, will bring a bigger smile to your face this season. 
Horror Films on Netflix photo
Do you like scary movies?
The tradition of watching scary movies during the Halloween season is now easier to keep up with than ever thanks to Netflix Instant. But with all the content available on the service, how do you know which ones are truly wor...


NYCC's Daredevil sizzle reel offers a brief glimpse of season two

Check out the back of Punisher's head
Oct 16
// Matt Liparota
So the first season of Netflix's Daredevil was pretty great, and Marvel knows how much everyone loved it. It's no surprise, then, that they hyped the show at New York Comic Con last week during their joint panel with Netflix ...
Jessica Jones photo
Jessica Jones

Jessica Jones teases some violence

I don't give a damn
Oct 01
// Matthew Razak
I may actually be getting more excited for Jessica Jones than I was for Daredevil. Netflix has done and awesome job at promoting this show and the new teaser is no different. We still haven't seen Kristen Ritter's face a...

Second teaser trailer for Jessica Jones crushes it

Short and sweet
Sep 28
// Matthew Razak
We still have no idea what Netflix and Marvel's Jessica Jones is going to be like. The first teaser gave us almost nothing but a hint at the style. This second one actual delivers a bit more info. It looks like they'll b...
Black Mirror Netflix photo
Black Mirror Netflix

Netflix teases its 12 new episodes of Black Mirror for Season Three

Twelve! Twelve episodes! Ah-ah-ah!
Sep 25
// Hubert Vigilla
It's now official: Netflix has ordered 12 new episodes of Black Mirror for Season 3. As we reported last time, Charlie Brooker is currently writing the new series, and the show will be produced in collaboration with House of ...
Jessica Jones photo
Jessica Jones

First images of Netflix's Jessica Jones are not so superhero

No masks. No capes. Just scarves.
Sep 17
// Matthew Razak
It's been pretty clear that Netflix's Jessica Jones, the second of their Marvel shows to land, wasn't going to be quite like the rest of Marvel's line-up. To start the plot is about a superhero who has retired and now she's s...
Jessica Jones photo
Solving super powered mysteries
Netflix has announced, in a oddly trippy teaser for the show that you can see below, that Jessica Jones will be landing at 12:01 a.m. on November 20th. That's only two months away guys! Anyone who dug Daredevil shou...

Black Mirror Netflix photo
Confession: I loved the pig episode
Charlie Brooker's Black Mirror was given new life when Netflix added it to its streaming library in late 2014. Many a thinkpiece ensued, and pretty much everyone you knew probably asked if you'd seen it at some point or ...

The Thirteen Best Korean Films Streaming on Netflix Instant (2015 Edition)

Sep 08 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
The Vengeance Trilogy (Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, Oldboy, and Lady Vengeance)Director: Park Chan-Wook  When you're trying to get into Korean cinema, The Vengeance Trilogy is both the best and worst place you could possibly start. Best because it's one of the strongest trilogies in cinema history and each film is fascinating in and of itself. Worst because it's one of the strongest trilogies in cinema history, which means that it's pretty much all downhill from there.  I'm frequently asked which film in the trilogy is my favorite, and it's hard to choose. I love them all for different reasons. Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance is the most visceral, Oldboy is a narrative marvel, and Lady Vengeance (especially the fade-to-black-and-white version, sadly not available on Netflix) is simply gorgeous. Many people would just put Oldboy here and be done with it, possibly relegating the other two to separate entries, but that does a disservice to everyone involved. Absolutely watch Oldboy, but don't watch it in a vacuum. Watch Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance here, Oldboy here, and Lady Vengeance here! The Man From NowhereDirector: Lee Jeong-Beom  I like The Man From Nowhere quite of lot, and many people like it a whole lot more than me. It's definitely one of the more enjoyable Korean action/martial arts films, following a mysterious protagonist as he works his way through a criminal ring that takes children and forces them to drug-related labor. It's an intense film with some truly badass moments (the through-the-window shot is among my favorite in recent memory), and even if it sometimes feels a bit too... American (it often feels like the film pulls punches in a way that something like The Chaser does not), it's well worth a watch. Watch it here! Lee Jeong-Beom's follow, No Tears for the Dead, is also available, and it has some pretty awesome moments as well. There's a whole bunch of crazy shootouts, explosions, and a ridiculous amount of blood. I don't know if it's better than The Man From Nowhere, but it's definitely worth checking out. Watch it here! The HostDirector: Bong Joon-Ho  Snowpiercer (also on Netflix) may have done more to bring Bong Joon-Ho's films to a wider audience, but The Host is definitely the better film. (Memories of Murder, which cemented his status as an essential Korean director, is sadly no longer available for streaming.) I could go on and on about how great The Host is, but I think Scott Tobias said it best on Twitter a little while back: [embed]218531:41946:0[/embed] A monster movie set during the day? Freaking genius. And it works. Oh boy does it work. For people who are a fan of giant monsters wrecking things, this is an easy recommendation. But even people who aren't really into that sort of thing should see it, because it's a spectacular and unique take on a very familiar concept. Watch it here! The Good, the Bad, and the WeirdDirector: Kim Jee-Woon  Kim Jee-Woon is my favorite director. It's not just that The Good, The Bad, and The Weird is an amazing film (although it's certainly that); the way it fits into Kim's filmography is so appropriate and bizarre. Following up A Bittersweet Life (among my favorite gangster films of all time) and A Tale of Two Sisters (a fascinating horror film that goes on and off of Netflix with unfortunate regularity), a straight-up comedy Western seems like a hardcore turn away. But it goes back further, and it's more reminiscent of Kim's second film, The Foul King, which is a comedy about a wanna-be Luchador wrestler. While The Good, The Bad, and The Weird turns things up to 11, it serves as a reminder of just how versatile a director Kim is. Watch it here! I Saw the DevilDirector: Kim Jee-Woon  Remember that time when I said that Kim Jee-Woon is my favorite director? Yeah, this list could have turned into a Kim Jee-Woon-fest if there were any more of his films on Netflix. This is quite probably the most depressing Korean revenge thriller, which you may know is a particularly depressing subgenre. Sometimes it seems like the film is delighting in just how fucked up it is and just how soul-crushing it can be, but that does nothing to diminish the artistry of it all. You need to be in a particular frame of mind to watch I Saw the Devil, but if you go in prepared for serious emotional pain, you'll only have your night ruined and not your entire life. (And it's worth that much.) Watch it here! New WorldDirector: Park Hoon-Jung  When Choi Min-sik told me about New World at the New York Asian Film Festival in 2012 (damn, time flies), he compared it to The Departed. I found that fascinating and just a little bit offensive. Was he implying that, as a white person, I hadn't seen Infernal Affairs and had only seen Scorsese's American-ized version? Problem was: I hadn't seen Infernal Affairs yet. I'd had a copy waiting for me at home for at least a year by that point, but I never got around to seeing it. Now I've seen Infernal Affairs, and it's a great movie that I highly recommend to those of you who have also been putting it off for inexcusable reasons. You know what else is great? New World. Watch it here! A Company ManDirector: Lim Sang-Yoon I've said in the past that A Company Man is the kind of film I joke about when I joke about the ultra-violence of Korean cinema. Here is a film that goes all-freaking-out in service of a message that really doesn't justify the bloodshed. Yes, all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, but even Jack Torrence didn't bring an M-16 to the office. So it's kind of problematic, and its message is hit-you-over-the-head-and-shoot-you-fifty-times blunt... but that didn't stop it from being enjoyable. It's certainly not on the level of Lesson of the Evil, which I still question my response to every so often, although it's also not quite as well-crafted as that film. Still, it's an interesting film and an enjoyable one. As long as you can handle bloodshed, you'll certainly be intrigued and most likely have a good time. Watch it here! PoetryDirector: Lee Chang-Dong  I knew that Poetry was going to be on this list from the moment I decided to write it. That moment was more than a year before I saw the film. For a long time, I simply neglected the works of Lee Chang-Dong. I don't have any good excuse for having done so, but he was the one big name in arthouse Korean cinema that I was aware of but seemed to be avoiding. I'm not avoiding him any longer. If you have neglected his works as well, I suggest fixing that immediately. But, like other films on this list, Poetry hits hard. It hits really, really hard. This is a film that will make you sad, and then it will just keep making you sad until the exceedingly sad ending. There is no catharsis, no hope, no redemption. There is simply life. Perhaps it's poetic, beautiful in some twisted way, but it goes straight for the heart, and once it latches onto you, it doesn't let go.  Watch it here! Hide and SeekDirector: Huh Jung  Hide and Seek is a movie that's terrifying in its plausibility. It's a creepy and tense thriller following a family that is being stalked by a helmeted murderer. They don't know why, and they don't seem to be able to stop it. The ultimate reveal is fascinating and also really freaking scary, and it gets at an interesting societal problem, one that may be Korea-focused but is certainly more broadly applicable. You can't sympathize with the murderer, but even understanding what might drive them to do this puts this a step above most films of its sort. I wish I could say more, but... it's best if you just see it for yourself. Watch it here! BreathlessDirector: Yang Ik-June  Breathless is like nothing else on this list, for a lot of reasons, but the biggest one you notice from the very first frame. Most films on this list are gorgeous. They've got high production value. They look and feel like cinema. Breathless... doesn't. It's ugly. It looks like a movie shot on tape in the late 1990s early 2000s. The audio isn't particularly well-mixed, high quality, or even apparently functional. There are weird bouts of silence throughout that seem like mistakes, though I don't think they were. It's also painfully slow... but none of that matters. This is a bleak and unrelenting look at a part of society that people try to ignore and/or forget, where bad people do bad things to innocents and everyone has to deal with the consequences. It takes a very long time to get into it, but commit and you'll be rewarded with something unique, fascinating, and depressing as hell. Watch it here!
Best Korean Netflix Films photo
This would be one hell of a marathon
For the past six or seven years, I've told people that my favorite type of international cinema is Korean. And even though I've been a little less in the loop recently than I was a few years ago, I still have a deep love for ...

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