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Hubert Vigilla
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NYFF Review: Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Midway through Céline Sciamma’s masterful Portrait of a Lady on Fire, we get the film’s thematic archstone. So much of this painterly, poetic queer romance is about looking at someone we desire and the feeling of being se...

 
 
 
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NYFF Review: The Irishman

The Irishman feels like it could be Martin Scorsese’s final film. It won’t be—he’s already working with Leonardo Di Caprio on Killers of the Flower Moon—and yet if you told me this was his last movie, I’d...

 
 
 
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Review: The Amazing Johnathan Documentary

My brother and I loved The Amazing Johnathan growing up. The stand-up comedian/magician specialized in oddball sleight of hand and strange props, and we’d often imitate the bit where he sticks a straw into his ear, pulls it out his mo...

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Review: Luz

When a film leans heavily into a retro aesthetic, I sometimes wonder how much is homage and how much of it is an affectation for cachet. Homage I’m fine with, but I have a hard time with filmmakers posturing for cred. I say this becau...

 
 
 
 
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Review: The Farewell

There’s a brief prefatory note in Lulu Wang’s The Farewell that gives viewers an idea of what to expect: “Based on an actual lie.” The film spun out of a 2016 piece Wang recorded for This American Life. I still haven...

 
 
 
 
 
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Neil Gaiman's Sandman is getting a big-budget Netflix series

A live-action adaptation of The Sandman seems to be getting off the ground after years of false starts. Neil Gaiman’s groundbreaking comics series will be coming to Netflix. Netflix has partnered with Warner Bros. TV to bring the crit...

 
 
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Review: Maiden

Every three years since 1973, there’s a worldwide yacht race. Now known as the Volvo Ocean Race, it was originally called the Whitbread Round the World Race. The grueling ordeal takes about nine months to complete, divided into multip...

 
 
 
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Review: The Fall of the American Empire

Every now and then I’ll see a movie that I don’t particularly like but I find thought provoking. Every now and then I’ll see a movie I find thought provoking not because of the depth of its ideas but because of the ideas i...

 
 
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Review: The Last Black Man in San Francisco

The beginning of The Last Black Man in San Francisco will probably be my favorite opening sequence in a film all year. A young girl with a lollipop—its color an almost otherworldly red—encounters men in hazmat suits by the bay. ...

 
 
 
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Review: Shadow

Zhang Yimou’s Shadow is a movie I need to see twice. How fitting. A second watch won’t just help me understand the complicated palace intrigue or enjoy the visual poetry that plays out in stunning tableaux; the images seem rende...

 
 
 
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Tribeca Review: Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound

Film is a visual medium, yet if you remove or tweak the sound elements, the film seems less cinematic. Think about 2001: A Space Odyssey without the classical music cues, or a different T-Rex roar in Jurassic Park, or if the ambient sound i...

 
 
 
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Tribeca Review: Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project

The 24-hour news cycle is ubiquitous yet ephemeral. Cable news networks have so much time to fill, but apart from select shows, the broadcasts are typically aired and forgotten, the footage rarely saved for posterity. That’s what make...

 
 
 
 
 
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Review: The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

The movie in your head is sometimes better than the actual movie. Think of the hype engendered by seeing good trailers and clips, or reading teases of the plot and descriptions of big scenes. The imagination fills in the gaps so well that t...

 
 
 
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Review: The Wind

The opening images of Emma Tammi’s The Wind set up the dread to come. Outside of a home on the frontier, two men wait. It is windswept and desolate and wordless, the light a cold, foreboding pre-dawn blue. A woman emerges in white, co...

 
 
 
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Review: An Elephant Sitting Still

Writer/director Hu Bo took his own life shortly after completing An Elephant Sitting, adapted from one of his own stories. He was only 29 years old. His lone feature film is so deeply moving and despondent. It is beautiful, and yet it aches...

 
 
 
 


About Hubert Vigillaone of us since 11:42 AM on 10.06.2011



Hubert Vigilla is a writer living in Brooklyn, which makes him completely indistinguishable from 4/5 of people who live in Brooklyn. He writes about film, television, books, music, politics, culture, and the internet on the internet.

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