De Niro and Scorsese team up for ninth film

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For the first few years of their careers, Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese practically made all their successes as a team. Rob and Marty cemented their place in the industry with gritty films like Raging Bull, Mean Streets, and Taxi Driver, later adding hits Cape Fear, Goodfellas, and Casino to their list of collaborative accomplishments. It’s been 15 years since Scorsese filmed De Niro, Sharon Stone, and Joe Pesci in Casino, the longest break from each other the duo has ever had. According to Total Film, De Niro and Scorsese are set to break their dry spell, signing on to make The Irishman, based on the novel I Heard You Paint Houses by Charles Brandt.

The story, adapted for film by Gangs of New York screenwriter Steve Zallian, follows a former union official who becomes a mob hit man. With The Aviator and Shutter Island behind him and the child-friendly Hugo Cabret ahead, Scorsese has increased the diversity of his film subjects and genres over the years, but remains one of the crime genre’s most faithful storytellers, as proven with his long-overdue Academy Award win for directing The Departed. While it’s an…

For the first few years of their careers, Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese practically made all their successes as a team. Rob and Marty cemented their place in the industry with gritty films like Raging Bull, Mean Streets, and Taxi Driver, later adding hits Cape Fear, Goodfellas, and Casino to their list of collaborative accomplishments. It's been 15 years since Scorsese filmed De Niro, Sharon Stone, and Joe Pesci in Casino, the longest break from each other the duo has ever had. According to Total Film, De Niro and Scorsese are set to break their dry spell, signing on to make The Irishman, based on the novel I Heard You Paint Houses by Charles Brandt.

The story, adapted for film by Gangs of New York screenwriter Steve Zallian, follows a former union official who becomes a mob hit man. With The Aviator and Shutter Island behind him and the child-friendly Hugo Cabret ahead, Scorsese has increased the diversity of his film subjects and genres over the years, but remains one of the crime genre's most faithful storytellers, as proven with his long-overdue Academy Award win for directing The Departed. While it's an attractive prospect to see these too masters of acting and directing join forces again, I just hope that De Niro can turn in a better performance than the one he phoned intoSaturday Night Live last week.

[via Total Film]