Why the Hell did I watch this: Visitor Q

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Growing up (and to this day), I’ve always had a love of horror movies. I can remember sneaking to watch Friday the 13th Part 4: The Final Chapter when it aired one summer night on HBO. As my mother and older brother sat enjoying the Vorhees carnage, I peered from the laundry room of our basement, amazed at the titties and blood and killing and titties. Unable to cope with my boner and tears of terror, I ending the evening crying myself to sleep with visions of Jason’s head sliding down the machete Tommy just lodged upside his head. And a flash or two of some titties.Â

I can’t recall a movie sticking with me the way that shitty slasher flick did (granted, I was 7 at the time) , until I saw Visitor Q by Japanese filmmaker Takashi Miike. Filmed in 2001, Visitor Q is the story of one of the most fucked up fictional families I’ve ever had the pleasure of watching. Incest, bullying, prostitution, domestic violence, necrophilia a
Growing up (and to this day), I've always had a love of horror movies. I can remember sneaking to watch Friday the 13th Part 4: The Final Chapter when it aired one summer night on HBO. As my mother and older brother sat enjoying the Vorhees carnage, I peered from the laundry room of our basement, amazed at the titties and blood and killing and titties. Unable to cope with my boner and tears of terror, I ending the evening crying myself to sleep with visions of Jason's head sliding down the machete Tommy just lodged upside his head. And a flash or two of some titties. 

I can't recall a movie sticking with me the way that shitty slasher flick did (granted, I was 7 at the time) , until I saw Visitor Q by Japanese filmmaker Takashi Miike. Filmed in 2001, Visitor Q is the story of one of the most fucked up fictional families I've ever had the pleasure of watching. Incest, bullying, prostitution, domestic violence, necrophilia and extreme lactating (new to X-Games in 2011) are all elements that individually are awful. When mashed together like some cluster of sick, sprinkled with Japanese humor and an unashamed attempt at "being deep"…they're kind of entertaining. Not "The Human Centipede" entertaining, but entertaining nonetheless.

Set in an unnamed region of Japan I never want to visit, Visitor Q opens with a simple question: "Have you ever done it with your Dad?". Quickly answering "Nope", I continued viewing, intrigued by such a mainstream opening. The story is focused on a dysfunctional family of four (mother, father, daughter, son) and a mysterious visitor who flips their already upside down world on its side. The next 84 minutes of my life were a combination of horror, awe, amazed laughter and a couple of shots of Cabo Wabo. One of my favorite scenes involves the father (seen above) and a dead woman. Yes, a dead woman.  Now, I'm not trying review this or advocate against or for its themes so if you want to check it out, please do/don't.