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Hardcore Henry trailer photo
Hardcore Henry trailer

The trailer for Hardcore Henry is kooky, FPS action delirium


They call me Mr. Fahrenheit
Feb 11
// Hubert Vigilla
Looks like we'll be getting a few first-person shooter-style movies this year. Not too long ago we shared a trailer for the zombie apocalypse FPS movie Pandemic. Today, we have a trailer for Hardcore Henry, an FPS-style actio...

Review: Where to Invade Next

Feb 11 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]219845:42640:0[/embed] Where to Invade NextDirector: Michael MooreRating: RRelease Date: December 23, 2015 (NY/LA); February 12, 2016 (wide) We start the invasion in Italy. Moore sits down with a couple in their living room to discuss what their paid vacation situation is like in the country. They get more than a month off, not including national and local holidays, and any unused vacation time rolls over into the next year. Moore's mouth is agog most of the time--he was genuinely learning all of this for the first time. But there's more. The wages tend to be better, the lunches are longer, and employees tend to be more productive on the job because they are so relaxed. Moore's invasion continues through Europe, with stops in France, Germany, Finland, Slovenia, Norway, and Portugal, continuing over the Mediterranean to Tunisia, then across the Atlantic to Iceland. Each time, there's a novel innovation, and each time Moore seems surprised and inspired. He focuses on one thing each country seems to be doing right. In Slovenia, for instance, all college is free, even for students who've come from abroad. In Finland, they've abolished homework. Moore admits that these countries have their own problems and he's mostly accentuating the positive. My job is picking the flowers and not the weeds, he says. He's also picking cherries, but that's not the biggest problem with Where to Invade Next, which, when it works, offers a fine rebuke of the "Fuck you, I got mine" mentality that pervades much of American culture. Moore's generally at his best when he's a deadpan observer rather than a fiery polemicist. Roger and Me is still his finest film (even though he did fudge the timeline of events) since it's mostly Moore as a citizen journalist documenting others. While framed around Moore trying to get an audience with General Motors CEO Roger Smith, the movie is driven by people who get to tell their own stories about the painful decline of Flint, Michigan. As Moore's clout grew, he became a more prominent figure in his films, and in turn his movies were more about Michael Moore's opinions on a subject rather than the subject itself. Moore develops a feel-good thesis in Where to Invade Next. These innovations in other countries could make America a better place, and they all have a shared origin. But Moore oversteps his skills as a documentary essayist through sloppy thinking and oversimplification. He walks past part of an old section of the Berlin Wall with a friend, and they reminisce about being there as it came down. Hammering and chiseling--the solution was so simple, they say. Well, no. History doesn't work that way. The Berlin Wall didn't come down just because some people in West Germany began chipping away at it for a few nights. There were decades of global history that culminated in that moment, and none of it was easy. While Moore smartly identifies the systemic racism underlying the US drug war, he dumbs down cause and effect in other parts of the film to suggest that the catalyst for change is something really simple. By that logic, the Arab Spring was easy as pie: all it took was for someone to self-immolate. No problemo. The systems themselves are simple and elegant, and yet the implementation of these solutions--free college, prison reform, education reform, greater gender representation in government--would have to be accomplished through legislative action and, even more difficult, a fundamental ideological shift in American attitudes regarding the bullshit of global capitalism and antiquated gender roles. These aren't so simple, they'll take time. But they're worth fighting for, which is why there's an oddly ennobling aspect to Where to Invade Next even for its flaws. In my head during each slip up, all I could think was, "Your argument is facile, but yeah, I agree, Michael." Moore's rhetorical missteps in Where to Invade Next come from a genuine place of concern. It's like a bad college essay. The larger point is good, but it's articulated and argued inartfully, whether through selective anecdotes rather than facts, or through emotional appeals rather than reason. The pat close of the movie is mushy and inspirational at the same time. Moore references a well-known fairy tale that takes place in the Midwest, and in the process made me think of another work (a book by Thomas Frank) about the contradictory relationship between political ideology and voting against your best interests in the Midwest. When film critic Stephen Whitty reviewed Fahrenheit 9/11 back in 2004, he wrote that Moore tends to worry liberals about as much as he infuriates conservatives. "They're people who agree with what Michael Moore says--but refuse to defend to the death the way he insists on saying it," he wrote. Some things don't change.
Review: Where to Invade photo
A feel good movie (but oversimplified)
Michael Moore and Donald Trump have something in common. No, seriously. They want to make America great again. In Where to Invade Next, Moore pretends he's been sent by the Pentagon to invade other countries. His mission: to ...

Batman v Superman photo
Batman v Superman

The final trailer for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice focuses on The Dark Knight


Na-na-na-na-na-na-na-na AFF-LECK!
Feb 11
// Hubert Vigilla
Here's your final official trailer for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, which mostly focuses on The Caped Crusader's mission to ensure the safety of humanity. He punches stuff real good, and even does a running reverse-bul...
The Purge 3 photo
The Purge 3

Watching this trailer for The Purge: Election Day is not a crime


#CrimeDay, #CrimeDeux, and #CrimeTrois
Feb 11
// Nick Valdez
What started out as an ironic love of The Purge's premise (#CrimeDay, the holiest of holidays) quickly grew into an honest joy when The Purge: Anarchy completely reinvented itself. Taking full advantage of all the chaos 12 ho...

Sornic photo
Sornic

Sonic the Hedgehog getting a live action/CG movie


Gotta go faaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaast
Feb 11
// Nick Valdez
With Sega's Sonic the Hedgehog series reaching its 25th anniversary, Sega is looking for all sorts of ways to celebrate everyone's favorite to hate hedgehog. Along with a potential new game, Sega's CEO, Hajime Satomi, announc...

Review: Deadpool

Feb 11 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
[embed]220353:42833:0[/embed] Deadpool Director: Tim Miller Release Date: February 12, 2016 Rating: R I think Deadpool will go down in history as the superhero movie that changed everything. It’s all been flipped upside down now. And I can tell you exactly when it happened. During a particularly fantastic montage, time passes through the holidays and a couple’s sexual exploits. It goes and goes and goes, and then suddenly Ryan Reynolds is on all fours. And you think, “No way.” And then, yes way, his girlfriend pegs him. If you don’t know what pegging is, you’re, uh, welcome to look it up. The point is: This is a movie that features that scene. That fascinating, beautiful scene. Of course, I knew right from the outset that this movie was a big deal. Its opening credits are brilliant not just because of what they show, but what accompanies them. It doesn’t some “A Tim Miller Film”; it says “Some douchebag’s film.” Not “Ryan Reynolds” but “God’s Perfect Idiot.” “Produced by Assholes.” Etc. And none of these people get named until the credits roll. Can you imagine that? This big-budget studio movie features an opening credits sequence, but it uses that sequence for an extended gag. No one is above it. Nothing is sacred. Presumably, that’s what you want from a Deadpool movie. I don’t really know, but the elated reaction of those around me certainly implied as much. It’s what I wanted, even though I didn’t necessarily know it at the time. I just knew that I wanted to have a good time and maybe see some fourth walls get broken. Also, ya know, I wanted to see what an R-rated superhero movie would look like. Because no, this is not the first R-rated comic book movie (or even superhero movie), but it is most assuredly the first R-rated superhero movie like this. When I try to think of anything at all like it, I just come up with Kickass. Maybe Wanted? Something inspired by Mark Millar. But those films honestly aren’t anything like Deadpool. They’re small scale, lacking the truly explosive factor of actual superheroes who can actually wreck things with their magical super skills. Deadpool has that, in the form of two members of the X-Men: “An Emo Teen” and “A CGI Character,” per the opening credits. (Of course, you wonder why they only have two, and two that I’d never heard of before. Well, so does Deadpool! Or, rather, he answers it, rhetorically: “It’s like the studio didn’t have enough money for anyone else.” (Or something to that effect.)) But these characters serve as the perfect foil to Deadpool. The emo teen is just that, an emo teen, and Deadpool loves it. He is so absolutely into her attitude problems, and, as such, so was I. The CGI character, whose CG presentation is so-so but effectively justified by him being introduced as “A CGI Character” is even better. He wants to be in a PG-13 X-Men movie so badly, but Deadpool just has to go and do R-rated things. The dynamic there is a joy to watch, and it The first trailer for Batman V. Superman came out around the same time as the first season of the Netflix Daredevil series. At the time, I got into a debate (well, argument) about grittiness in comic book movies. She claimed (and was not alone in thinking) that it was hypocritical of people to praise Daredevil’s grit in the same sentence that they lambasted BvS’s. Of course, that argument is fundamentally flawed, because it’s not about “grit” at all; it’s about staying true to the character. Daredevil’s world is a dark one, a gritty one. Batman’s too, really. Superman has a symbol for hope on his chest, and he’s… what? Man of Steel is a lot of things, but hopeful ain’t one of them. And it doesn’t look like Dawn of Justice is going to do much to change that. Marvel let Daredevil be the character he’s supposed to be, while DC didn’t do the same for a man who blocks bullets with his eyes. Deadpool is Marvel, once again, letting a character be who they should be. I’m oh-so-glad that this was a Fox production and not a Disney one, because I don’t think that would have been true if Disney had handled it. If Deadpool was part of the Cinematic Universe, I think… well, I don’t even think they would have tried to put the character in at all. He simply cannot work within that context. But he can work within his own, and the one in which the X-Men are real. The Fox MCU is all about mutants, and Deadpool both as a title character and a film in general is consistent with that. But Fox took a gamble making an R-rated superhero movie. They could have tried for mass-market appeal (maybe) and neutered the character entirely. But instead, they said, “No. You want Ryan Reynold’s to get pegged? Go for it, dude.” It’s a gutsy move, and it pays off in spades precisely because it feels right, even to someone who knows nothing about Deadpool. I know that this film did the character justice, because there are too many crazy decisions for them to not be. Nothing about this movie is “safe,” and that’s exactly the way it should be. Some people will complain about the fact that we’re getting yet another origin story and that the origin story itself isn’t unique or whatever, but neither of those things bothered me. There are two reasons for that. 1)    I don’t know Deadpool’s origin story. 2)    Being “Original” isn’t even sort of the point. Deadpool’s origin, as told by this film, is fucked up. Honestly, the torture sequences wouldn’t be out of place in some kind of horror movie (something which the film itself notes). The fact that it’s so brutal does make it stand out (thinking back on it, V for Vendetta seems similar, particularly given how the kraken is released), but even if it didn’t, so what? I may be able to expect the beats, but I don’t know them line-for-line like Batman or Spiderman or whoever. As a way to introduce this character to what will hopefully be a flourishing franchise, I really wouldn’t have had it any other way. For the second time in three months, I am imploring you to see this film. Not just because it’s excellent (though it is), but also because it’s a film that deserves success. (Side note: Both this and The Revenant were distributed by Fox. Good on those people. Seriously.) This is a gamble that paid off in spades from an entertainment perspective, and I want it to make a heckuva lot of money. So, make it happen. I know that I’ll be seeing it again. And again. (And again.) ((And again.)) It’s so good, you guys.
Deadpool Review photo
Probably the best superhero movie ever
I have never read a Marvel comic. There. I said it. In fact, I’ve never read any superhero comic that isn’t about a man who dresses like a bat. I think superheroes are all well and good, but I’ve never felt ...

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Michael Fassbender: Assassin's Creed is kinda like The Matrix


DNA memory "elevates" the material
Feb 10
// Matt Liparota
Early looks at the upcoming videogame adaptation Assassin's Creed might give the appearance that the film is an adventure set in the distant past, but all might not be what it seems. Star Michael Fassbender tells Empire that ...
Depp as Trump photo
This is a yuge, luxurious parody
This is a pleasant surprise. Funny or Die just dropped The Art of the Deal: The Movie, a 50-minute mockumentary that lampoons Donald Trump's general douchebaggery. Starring Johnny Depp as The Donald, the parody also features ...

Why the Coen brothers' Hail, Caesar! should have been a series instead of a movie (SPOILERS)

Feb 09 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220337:42831:0[/embed] Both Tasha Robinson at The Verge and Lesley Coffin at The Mary Sue mentioned in their reviews that Hail, Caesar! feels more like a TV pilot than a film, which is accurate. The film introduces a rich cast of characters, many of which could have carried their own films about the trials and tribulations of 1950s Hollywood. There's Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin), a studio head and fixer dealing with the difficult day-to-day grind of running Capitol Pictures and managing his talent. There's Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), a leading man who's kidnapped by a group of subversive Communist screenwriters while he is shooting a swords and sandals epic about Jesus told from the Roman point of view. There's Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), a singing-cowboy who's trying to be turned into a debonair leading man. There's DeeAnna Moran (Scarlett Johansson), a pregnant starlet trying to figure out how to keep her situation under wraps. There's Thora Thacker and Thessaly Thacker (both played by Tilda Swinton in increasingly ridiculous hats), twin sisters and rival gossip columnists. There's Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), a high-toned director of stylish pictures. And there's Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), a tap dancing leading man who looks great in a sailor outfit. It's almost like Joel and Ethan Coen had about six or seven ideas about different Hollywood movies they wanted to do and just decided to jam them all together in one picture. It's no wonder everything feels just half-developed with that ensemble; at a certain point, the characters felt more like cameos, and Hail, Caesar! feels less like a story with actual stakes and more like a pretext for fun gags (one of the standouts is a theological debate over a script), amusing scenes (Hobie killing time before a film premiere by twirling a lasso around), and extended homages to Hollywood's past (overt nods to On the Town, ditto Esther Williams water ballets). When I think of The Big Lebowski, it feels like a film even though it's so packed with colorful characters, but Hail, Caesar! feels like the start of something rather than a self-contained story. I'm obviously in no position to tell the Coen brothers' how to do what they do, but in my head, I could envision Hail, Caesar! as a six-episode miniseries on Netflix, with each episode running 45 minutes. The entire series would still, like the film, take place in just one day, but each episode would focus on a particular plot in the film anchored to a character or group of characters. One episode could cover Baird's kidnapping and the whole Communist conspiracy subplot. One episode would be about the dueling Thacker sisters trying to out-scoop each other. Another about DeAnna's dilemma, what it was like to be an over-scrutinized starlet at that time, and how she winds up with Jonah Hill's character by the end. (About 95% of Hill's total screentime is in the trailers and commercials.) Another episode could be about Lorentz and Burt, their possible clandestine relationship, and the experience of closeted gay talent in Hollywood during this era. Hobie's episode would be a comedy of manners as he drifts between high and low genres as well as casual and formal situations. And of course, there'd be an episode about Mannix and his choice of being the fixer of a studio or accepting a better and easier position at Lockheed. Each episode would occasionally intersect with other episodes, presenting the same scene, but possibly offering a different point of view of that scene. (Think Elephant or Jackie Brown.) The constant in every show, however, would be Mannix. He's the moral core and center of the studio, and without him these lives would fall apart. The final episode, which would be Mannix's episode, would cover all of the things he did in the day that weren't in the other episodes, like the bookending confessions, his theological meeting, his big decision about the Lockheed gig, etc. It would also give a chance to see more interactions with his wife (a wasted Allison Pill), his secretary (Heather Goldenhersh), and an editor (Frances McDormand). The Coen brothers have shown a knack for aesthetic shapeshifting, and had Hail, Caesar! been a series instead of a movie, they could have made each episode have its own style and mood befitting the character and plot being covered. Most importantly, though, the characters would all be given their due and have their stories told--plots rather than subplots, an ensemble cast rather than a collection of cameos. We're in a golden age of television, streaming, and episodic storytelling. It would have been great to see the Coen brothers pay homage to that waning golden age of Hollywood in a serialized medium that is now coming into its own.
Hail, Caesar! as a series photo
The Golden Age of Hollywood: The Show
The Coen brothers' Hail, Caesar! is not a bad film. The Coen brothers are such expert craftsmen that they are incapable of making a bad movie. They're always at least watchable. If you look at their filmography, they have mad...

Netflix Five: Under-the-radar horror films

Feb 09 // Sean Walsh
[embed]220351:42826:0[/embed] The Veil (2016)Director: Phil JoanouRating: 3/5 From the director of the totally excellent Punisher: Dirty Laundry fan film with a script by Robert Ben Garant of Reno 911 fame, The Veil features Jessica Alba, Tom Jane, and American Horror Story alum Lily Rabe. The film tells the story of the lone survivor of the group suicide of a cult known as Heaven's Veil (Rabe) led Jim Jones Jacobs (Jane). A young woman (Alba) and her film crew convince Rabe's character to return to the scene of the suicide and help them find footage that was shot at the compound but never found. Shocking nobody, things get spooky and bodies start piling up fairly quickly. The Veil wasn't anything special, but it was okay. Tom Jane's charasmatic cult leader was well-acted and certainly the best performance in the film, similar to Michael Parks' role in Red State. Alba's character feels awfully underdeveloped and Rabe is there to more or less help move the plot along. One saving grace was that the filmmakers made the smart decision of not making The Veil a found footage film (which it was originally going to be!) , despite the importance placed on film footage and even the usage of footage to help tell the story. While it isn't groundbreaking by any stretch, had they made it into a found footage film it would be just another addition to a sea of mediocre films. Bottom line: you can certainly do worse than The Veil. [embed]220351:42827:0[/embed] Kristy (2013)Director: Oliver BlackburnRating: 4/5 Most home invasion thrillers usually take place at, well, homes, so the fact that Kristy took place on a college campus was a refreshing change of pace. The plot is as simple as they come: a girl stays on campus over Thanksgiving break and finds herself terrorized by three people in hoodies and masks that keep calling her 'Kristy' (her name is Justine). See? Simple. The trope of 'victim fights back' is as old as they come, but it's especially effective in this film. Once things get going, which blissfully doesn't take all that long, they move at a fast pace all the way up to the end. The simplicity and execution of Kristy offsets the edgy social media motivations of the killers, who really didn't need any explanation beyond their rants about 'Kristy.' The three masked intruders in The Strangers had zero backstory and it was far more effective that way. That said, Kristy is an excellent addition to the home invasion genre.  [embed]220351:42828:0[/embed] Butcher Boys (2012)Director: Duane Graves Rating: N/A (didn't finish) A girl and her friends end up on the wrong side of the tracks and in the sights of a group of bad boy leather jacket cannibals. Yeehaw. I got about halfway into Butcher Boys before giving up the ghost and moving on to pulling out my brains like the Egyptians did during mummification, as it was considerably more preferable than continuing this film. The big problem is that instead of taking characters akin to Leatherface and his family out of the country and into an urban setting, we get a bunch of uninteresting bad boys with a taste for flesh. I recently read Shane McKenzie's Muerte Con Carne and standing next to that, Butcher Boys was bland and boring. If I had to give what I watched a rating, it would be echh/5. [embed]220351:42830:0[/embed] Contracted (2013)Director: Eric EnglandRating: 5/5  Contracted is a cautionary tale about going to parties and drinking too much like Requiem for a Dream is one to doing hard drugs. Poor Samantha drinks too much at a party to forget about her ex-girlfriend and is date raped. What Samantha passes off as a hangover proves to be far more grave and in the days that follow the party, she finds herself having contracted (do you see what I did there?) a very, very heinous case of the STD blues. This film is not for the weak of heart as it is essentially a grotesque variant of torture porn as we spend the admittedly short run time (clocking in at a paltry 78 minutes) watching Samantha fall apart. The effects are spectacular, gross enough to give Tom Savini pause, and they really make it apparent that Sam is really not in for a good time. Ultimately, Contracted feels like the first in what could easily be a trilogy (and with a second installment out, it certainly seems likely), showing us at length the prologue to an epidemic, something that usually only takes up a small piece of a single film. After having watched both Contracted and its sequel, I am certainly excited to see where they take it next. [embed]220351:42829:0[/embed] Frankenstein's Army (2013)Director: Richard Raaphorst Rating: 5/5  As I touched on above, found footage films can be really hit or miss. Fortunately for me, as I was incredibly hungry to see this film based on the DVD art alone, Frankenstein's Army was awesome. Frankenstein's Army has another fairly simple premise: during World War II, some Russian soldiers respond to a distress call in Germany and find themselves neck-deep in Silent Hill body horror insanity with little to no hope of escape. While the movie may not be the Citizen Kane of the horror genre, the designs of the titular 'army' alone would've gotten this a 5/5 with me. The monsters are absolutely horrific and unlike anything I've seen in live-action movies. I don't want to even try to describe them, lest I ruin the surprise as each one rears its ugly head. My only problem with this film is the fact that the footage looks like it was shot with a modern video camera as opposed to something that would've been used during WWII. Considering how awesome the monsters looked, I can't imagine it would've been too hard for editors to age the film so make it look era-appropriate. Despite that one issue, Frankenstein's Army is up there with The Children and Event Horizon in my personal favorite horror films. 
Netflix 5: horror films photo
Give new meaning to "Netflix and chill"
Netflix Five is a quick and dirty look at five films or shows that we've watched and want to either recommend or condemn for our readers to help make their trip through the instant queue a little less overwhelming. Not every ...

Nick's Top 15 Movies of 2015

Feb 08 // Nick Valdez
30-16: Tangerine, The Voices, Everly, Welcome to Me, Predestination, Turbo Kid, It Follows, The Good Dinosaur, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, True Story, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, Inside Out, Trainwreck, Sicario, Sleeping With Other People 15. The Intern You can argue that Robert DeNiro's name doesn't have the same amount of drawing power that it used to. What was once a name synonymous with fantastic work is now a name for someone who seemingly accepts whatever project gets put on his desk. The Intern at first glance seemed like yet another cash in for DeNiro, but instead holds a surprising amount of depth within. It has one of the best screenplays of the year with a nuanced platonic relationship between its two leads, layers of depth to DeNiro's character that's only really hinted at (he cries at one point, and it's wonderfully mysterious and never talked about), and it's just unique. It's a story that's been kind of done before, but not in this fashion. A breath of fresh air from everyone involved.  14. The Martian The Martian checks all the boxes of a standard crowd pleaser. It's based off a best selling book, Ridley Scott is director, it's got a great cast, and it allows Matt Damon to charm us for two hours straight. I would've preferred a greater sense of his isolation (that's why it's not higher on this list), but I do like what we've gotten instead. Charming performances made all that science easily digestible, and it was just a good time. There were very few films last year with honest to goodness "happy endings," so this stood out all the more.  13. Ex Machina In this ever advancing technological age, philosophers and scientists alike question the nature of artificial intelligence. If technology ever advances to the point where we can create and shape sentient beings, how much of that artificial nature is truly man-made? Films like Blade Runner and even Terminator have explored this theme before, but the question has never been posited better than it was in Ex Machina. With enthralling performances (and the one Alicia Vikander should've really been nominated for), Ex Machina is an intimate exploration of inanimate things. Also, Oscar Isaac's disturbing yet erotic dance number is one for the record books.  12. Spotlight I'm usually skeptic of films based on true events. Something always gets lost in translation and muddies up the final product. Spotlight has zero of these issues. As its title suggests, Spotlight is laser focused in its premise and what it wants to get across. Driven entirely through dialogue and excellent camera work as its docu-drama presentation invokes a sense of urgency as the deadline to story break gets closer and closer. Intense, gorgeous, and full of sleights that can definitely be ignored if you don't pay attention. It's gripping from beginning to end.  11. The Final Girls There's been a rise in meta-narrative films over the last few years. Thanks to the "ironic" nature of millenial pop culture, it's become popular to break film genres down into their cynical core components and ridicule them. I expected the same with The Final Girls. When I found out the film was about a few kids getting trapped in a horror film, I figured I was in for the same kind of "let's avoid stupid horror mistakes" that films like Cabin in the Woods and Tucker and Dale vs. Evil perfected years before. Instead, the film delivered a sincere and heartbreaking story of dealing with the loss of a loved one. And of course, it's also pretty funny.  10. The Hateful Eight You know what you're getting with Quentin Tarantino. Both an auteur and a gore junkie, Tarantino's films all have a distinct style and flair. You also know the film's probably going to be great. It's not higher on this list thanks to his usual trappings (I wish he didn't resort to violence for every finale now), but it earns its place by being a technical marvel. I didn't get to see it in 70MM, but what I did see was absolutely gorgeous. And it's a film entirely focused on the dialogue that's made him famous. The Hateful Eight has some masterful tonal work and I had no idea whether I should laugh or cringe. It spends its run time messing with your expectations, and by the time the end rolled around, I had no idea I sat there for three hours.  9. Straight Outta Compton Biopics are rarely done well. Either they get the facts wrong, or they focus on the wrong period of time, or they just aren't interesting enough of a subject to work. While Straight Outta Compton definitely has some of those pitfalls, it's the most entertaining biopic I've ever seen. Encapsulating a time period, a rap group, and a cultural movement all into one nearly seamless package is a filmmaking marvel. It's also got a litany of fantastic performances from actors who I hope go on to do great things. I can't wait to see what the main trio of O'Shea Jackson Jr., Corey Hawkins, and Jason Mitchell do next.  8. Cartel Land Honestly, I was torn between Cartel Land and Sicario. Both tackle the seedy underbelly of the cartel world, but only one gets into its real gritty nature. As Cartel Land shines a light on a shadow world that's so often ignored, it also teaches people cultures they probably don't understand. Sure worshiping gang leaders through narcocorridos and legends seems weird at first, but when you understand how intense of a fear a society can be put through, you'll realize how people can try to find the positive within the negative. It's frightening how Cartel Land numbs you to the pain within its short time span and even more so when it restates how very real it all is.  7. Felt As the general glut of popular cinema fights to become more diverse, no film challenged the state of the industry more head on than Felt. With popular TV and film culture becoming more enamored with sexual aggression and violence in order to get attention, Felt reminds us of our follies. Cranking up the film's intimacy to an almost intimidating degree, the viewer and subject are caught in a constant battle of agency. Diverting your gaze will only succumb you to aggression while falling into the film's visuals is further stealing its main character's power within. Featuring a magnetic performance from Amy Everson, who only worked on the film as an art project, Felt was one of the most enlightening experiences I had last year.  6. Anomalisa I always look forward to animated films every year. Animation can do things we could never hope to do with normal cinematography, so I always wonder what surprises are in store. I had no idea that 2015 would bring me an animated film that changed how I looked at myself. Anomalisa at surface level is about a man bored with life who meets someone who changes his life for a moment. But there's so much going on underneath. An exploration of a self-centered ego, the use of stagnancy to enhance the awkwardness of the entire situation, and having only three cast members fill an entire world full of people is just sublime. That's really the only word I can use to describe Anomalisa.  5. Mad Max: Fury Road Who would've guessed that a Mad Max sequel decades in the making only to be stuck in development hell for four years would go on to be one of the best films of the year? Mad Max: Fury Road is so good, you can really only use buzzwords to capture its magic. Every cheesy and overplayed adjective absolutely means something here. "Gorgeous"? I've never seen a desert look better? "Action packed"? The film is a two hour chase scene. "Gripping"? Absolutely. All while putting the focus on the badass Furiosa and her army of equally as badass women. I hope it's not another hundred years before we get the next Mad Max.  4. Room Isolation films always do a number on me. One of my greatest fears is to be stuck into some kind of solitude, so films of that kind always hit me harder than usual. But Room isn't like every other isolation film. Rather than wallow in the peril of the moment itself, the characters are always looking outward. This comes through especially in its two leads as Brie Larson portrays a woman with a damaged underbelly and its young lead, Jacob Trembley, keeping up with her every step of the way. He turns in the best child performance I've seen in some time. Room is dark, highly emotional, and incredibly uncomfortable. Yet, I couldn't look away.  3. What We Do in the Shadows A lot of my favorite films last year were smaller releases. None smaller perhaps than What We Do in the Shadows, a quiet "blink and you'll miss it" release that I ended up watching four times. It's been a long time since I watched a film and instantly re-watched it right after, and I'm happy this was in my life. Packed to the brim with jokes (so packed you'll need a re-watch to catch them all), fine tuned comedic performances, and a well realized world (I can't wait for that werewolves movie), What We Do in the Shadows is a brilliant time. I want to quote it endlessly here, but I'll limit myself to my favorite: "If you are going to eat a sandwich, you would just enjoy it more if you knew no one had fucked it." 2. Dope As 2015 saw an increase in diverse storytelling (though I hope 2016 improves even more), Dope was a story as diverse as they come. Following a unique protagonist caught in a story we've only seen a few times but told in a fresh way, the film was entertaining from beginning to end. Plenty of films try so hard to catch the "youth" culture, but watching Dope seamlessly blend new visuals with nostalgic music and themes was astounding. It was just great to see a real underdog win for once. All in all, Dope was well...dope.  1. Creed No matter how many films I watched before and after this, I still can't get Creed out of my head. In fact, even as I jot this down I'm reminded of how fantastically it nails everything. It's a reboot, yet an epilogue to another story. It's a sequel, yet can stand all on its own. It's reminiscent of the past, yet never feels like a retread. Creed managed to capture the same vibe as the original Rocky saga, reminded you how great of a big dumb lug Rocky Balboa was (and how emotionally present Stallone could be given something he really cares about), was culturally relevant as it really should be used as the spearhead of a new cinematic movement, and is ultimately a technical marvel as it changed the way boxing films should be shot forever. Creed was my favorite film of 2015 and could very well go on to be my favorite of the decade. 
Top 15 of 15 photo
2015 certainly was something
2015 was a crazy year for a lot of us here at Flixist. There were some major changes inside and out. On my end, I moved across the country and have been getting into new digs for the past ten months. I'm loving my new life ri...

Larry David #FeelTheBern photo
Larry David #FeelTheBern

Watch Bernie Sanders appear on SNL and make Larry David #FeelTheBern


Totes biffles and bros
Feb 08
// Hubert Vigilla
The presidential race is heating up for the Democrats and Republicans, with the New Hampshire Primary taking place tomorrow. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders got away from the campaign trail and made a brief stop in New York to...
10 Cloverfield Lane TV photo
10 Cloverfield Lane TV

10 Cloverfield Lane teases a certain monster in this mysterious Super Bowl TV spot


Roooaaar
Feb 08
// Hubert Vigilla
The first trailer for 10 Cloverfield Lane came from out of nowhere. (Sort of like an RKO.) Directed by Dan Trachtenberg and produced by J.J. Abrams, the film had a similarly mysterious Super Bowl TV spot that teased the poten...
Independeuce SB Spot photo
Independeuce SB Spot

Independence Day: Resurgence's Super Bowl spot fights for independence again


Feb 08
// Nick Valdez
All the Earthlings, independent, throw your hands up at me.  Independence Day: Resurgence opens June 24th. 
Marvel Money photo
Marvel Money

Hulk and Ant-Man fight over coke for our money


Feb 08
// Nick Valdez
Sad over the lack of Hulk in the latest non-Avengers yet still Avengers movie, Captain America: Civil War? Well here he is fighting chasing down Ant-Man and a can of Coca-Cola. Wait, why am I even writing on this? It's not like Coke paid me off or someth- drinkcokedrinkcokedrinkcokedrinkcoke
Deadpool Superb Owl photo
Deadpool Superb Owl

Deadpool talks about the football in this here Superb Owl TV spot


Chimichangas
Feb 08
// Hubert Vigilla
I think we all can agree: the Superb Owl is one of the best sporting events in all sport. To explain his love of sportball, here's Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) talking about his athletic aspirations. Remember, sports fans: there...
Turkish Batman v Superman photo
Turkish Batman v Superman

Watch the Batman v Superman v Turkish Airlines Super Bowl TV spots


Do you bleed... or offer bonus miles?
Feb 08
// Hubert Vigilla
Even though I've been generally down on the grim and gritty tone of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, these two Super Bowl TV spots were lots of kooky fun. It's a little bit of levity in a dour world of adolescent power fan...
Jason Bourne photo
Bond vs. Bourne again
The Bourne franchise was supposed to be going its own merry way without Matt Damon, but after The Bourne Legacy failed to be a mega hit the actor was lured back to the character to help the universe out again. The first ...

TMNT 2 SB Spot photo
TMNT 2 SB Spot

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows gets a Krang-zy trailer


Krang!
Feb 08
// Nick Valdez
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of Shadows is coming off very apologist. After the first film was knocked about by fans (I liked it enough and it got the turtles' personalities right), the sequel wants to do everything it c...
X-Men: Apocalypse SB Spot photo
X-Men: Apocalypse SB Spot

X-Men: Apocalypse's Super Bowl spot locks it down


Finally, some Psylocke action
Feb 08
// Nick Valdez
I was a bit worried after X-Men: Apocalypse's first trailer seemed like a mess, but the tighter editing on this 30 second Super Bowl spot cleaned it up. Rather than seem over packed, the little tidbits we're shown are cool lo...
Civil War SB Spot photo
United and divided through Twitter
It's really hard looking at Captain America: Civil War and reminding myself that it's not just another Avengers movie. Dropping all of the friend stuff from the first trailer, this Super Bowl spot definitely wants you to choo...

Life-sized Batman photo
Life-sized Batman

For $8,000, you can buy a life-sized Ben Affleck Batman collectible


Batman: The Real Doll
Feb 07
// Hubert Vigilla
As the hype builds for the March 25th release of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, news came in of a new movie tie-in collectible. If you have ever wanted a 1.95 meter (6'4") statue of Ben Affleck as an armored Batman, it c...

Review: Hail, Caesar!

Feb 05 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
[embed]220336:42811:0[/embed] Hail, Caesar!Directors: Joel and Ethan CoenRelease Date: February 5th, 2016Rating: PG-13  I feel for whoever it was who had to cut together the trailer for Hail, Caesar! I imagine it was a nightmare scenario, trying to take what is really just a series of occasionally linked comedic sequences and turn it into something that appears to be dramatic and compelling. And so whoever it was built a narrative, one where George Clooney, a big-name actor who sometimes forgets his lines at key moments, is kidnapped by a mysterious organization, and stars like Channing Tatum and Scarlett Johansson are enlisted to help get him back. Cameo appearances by Tilda Swinton and Jonah Hill and the like just serve to make it all one big star-studded Hollywood mystery. But… no. That’s not what Hail, Caesar! is at all. A couple of those things happen, but the context presented in the trailer is, to put it bluntly, bullshit. In fact, that opening, with George Clooney’s big speech? That takes place less than ten minutes from the end of the film. Yeah. That’s not the introduction to that character. It’s the resolution. In fact, much of the trailer comes from the second half of the film, and it almost feels like it went in reverse chronological order. The “reveal” of the secret society that ends the trailer feels like a big end-of-act reveal. Maybe the end of the first act? And sure enough, that does happen around then. Problem is, all of the imagery the trailer subjected us to up until that point takes place after we already know who they are. Because it’s not even really a secret. I’m not going to tell you, but that’s pretty much entirely because you’ve already had the ending spoiled, so why not give you something?  You don’t watch Hail, Caesar! for the narrative, because there is no narrative. As I said, it’s a series of occasionally linked comedic sequences. That’s honestly the best way to describe it. Characters come in, do their funny thing, and then are never seen from again. Or they come in briefly a handful of times, all teasing some far more interesting existence than the one we’re seeing. It’s all potential. This is a film of unending potential. Each character has a backstory that seems rich enough to justify not necessarily a movie, but certainly an episode of a series. I would watch Hail, Caesar! the series. None of the myriad characters really gets their due, and it’s such a shame. I wanted more of damn near everyone. And arguments could be made that being left wanting is better than the alternative, but I have to wonder: What’s the point of it all? It’s like a cupcake with a nice foil wrapper. You look at it, and it looks good. You take a first bite, and it is good. But then you pull back the foil wrapper, and you realize that there’s nothing more to the cupcake. It’s just air. You liked those couple of bites you got, but you’re so disappointed that that’s all there was. No cream filling? Heck, you would have even accepted just more cake! But you don’t get that. Instead, you just have a well-crafted cupcake top in the guise of something more. Of course, what is there is good. Let’s not pretend otherwise. The Coen Brothers are beloved for a reason: They know how to make good movies. Hail, Caesar! is pretty, funny, fun, and any number of other adjectives, but that’s just baseline. There’s nothing more here to remind you of why the Coen Brothers are a household name. You get some really fun sequences – and I sincerely hope that the musical numbers are practice for a full-blown musical film that they’ve got up their sleeves – but there’s nothing to really bite into. You go from fun thing to fun thing, always expecting more. Always hoping for more. Always feeling that there is more, but the Coen Brothers don’t think you’re cool enough to see it. When I think about the movie, I don’t really have any “complaints,” per se. I have my big fundamental issue, but from moment to moment, there’s not really much negative to say. But there’s also nothing wildly positive to say. This is a movie that is Good and nothing more. It doesn’t even really aspire to be more. It seems content in its Goodness. I don’t have a problem with Good movies – I appreciate any movie that has the audacity to be simply enjoyable – but I wanted this to be great. And it just isn’t. I never thought that word, or felt it, but I wanted to oh so badly. I felt like there were times where I should have thought, “Wow! That was great!” but I just… didn’t. And from the Coen Brothers, that stings. They’ve made so many classics, comedic and otherwise, that something merely Good from them feels lazy. This is a Coen Brothers puff piece, some something they did to fulfill a contract. And a Coen Brothers puff piece is still worth seeing, but it’s certainly not something worth celebrating.
Hail, Caesar! Review photo
Act One?
Joseph Kahn, director of Detention, the best film ever made, is an exceedingly well respected music video director. Most recently, he’s known as the guy who makes all those amazing Taylor Swift music videos. Together, t...

The Witch and satanists photo
The Witch and satanists

The Satanic Temple is holding early screenings of The Witch, which has a new trailer


"I sell shoes!"
Feb 03
// Hubert Vigilla
Ever since hearing about Robert Eggers' The Witch at last year's Sundance Film Festival, I've been waiting eagerly to see it. If you live in New York City, Los Angeles, Austin, or Detroit, you can catch the movie a few days e...
Pandemic trailer photo
Pandemic trailer

Watch the trailer for Pandemic, an FPS-style take on the zombie apocalypse


Needs HUD with health/ammo information
Feb 02
// Hubert Vigilla
There have been quite a few films shot entirely from the first-person perspective. The results of this can vary. You have loads of found-footage movies, for example, many of which are fodder with some memorable exceptions (th...
Green Room trailer photo
Green Room trailer

Watch the red band trailer for Green Room, starring Patrick Stewart as a neo-Nazi (NSFW)


From Blue Ruin director Jeremy Saulnier
Feb 02
// Hubert Vigilla
Writer/director Jeremy Saulnier's Blue Ruin was an exceptionally made, critically acclaimed revenge thriller that drew comparisons to the Coen Brothers' Blood Simple. It was one of my favorite movies released in 2014. For a f...
JLA vs. Teen Titans photo
JLA vs. Teen Titans

Check out the trailer for Justice League vs. Teen Titans, a new DCU animated film


Heroes vs. Possessed Heroes
Feb 02
// Hubert Vigilla
In general, I'm more excited about the animated DCU releases than I am their live-action blockbusters (Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Suicide Squad). There's something about classic and newer DCU animation like Batman: T...
New John Carpenter album photo
New John Carpenter album

John Carpenter's Lost Themes II coming in April, with live shows and possible US tour dates


If I were a carpenter...
Feb 01
// Hubert Vigilla
Last year, horror maestro John Carpenter released the album Lost Themes, a collection of original compositions that could have come from one of his movies. If you loved Lost Themes, you'll be happy to know that a new Carpente...
Ewan McGregor Star Wars photo
Ewan McGregor Star Wars

Ewan McGregor discusses his Star Wars: The Force Awakens cameo


Obi-Wan Kenobi speaks
Feb 01
// Hubert Vigilla
Several months ago we reported that Ewan McGregor might have a cameo in the new Star Wars films. Turns out the rumors were true. While promoting Jane Got a Gun (a western starring Natalie Portman) on Jimmy Kimmel Live, McGreg...
Bill Clinton viewing list photo
Bill Clinton viewing list

Behold: A complete list of every movie Bill Clinton watched in The White House


Naked Gun 33 1/3 - March 12, 1994
Feb 01
// Hubert Vigilla
The Iowa caucuses are today, which means that the race for The White House is really kicking off tonight. Whoever becomes the new POTUS will have the fate of the free world in his or her hands. He or she will also be able to ...

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