Halloween Returns photo
Halloween Returns

Halloween Returns will start shooting July without Rob Zombie


The Bat, The Cat, and The Shape
Jun 16
// Hubert Vigilla
The Halloween franchise rides again with Halloween Returns, which starts shooting in July. Halloween Returns, incidentally, is almost as silly a title as Halloween Rides Again but not as good as Halloween: Tokyo Drift or...
Gambit photo
Gambit

Rupert Wyatt to direct Gambit


From Gambler to Gambit
Jun 15
// Matthew Razak
It is kind-of mind boggling that Fox has taken so long to get a Gambit movie off the ground. The character is a fan favorite and perfect for film, and yet they've basically hobbled along for years now with the property. Thank...
Jurassic World box office photo
Jurassic World box office

Jurassic World earned the biggest worldwide box office debut of all time


"That is one big pile of s**t"
Jun 15
// Hubert Vigilla
C's get degrees, and C-grade movies get lots of money. Jurassic World earned an astounding $511.8 million around the world, giving the film the biggest opening global box office of all time. The movie features Chris Pratt all...

5 dinosaur movies you should watch instead of Jurassic World

Jun 12 // Nick Valdez
We're Back! A Dinosaur's Story Ah, We're Back. Truth be told, I had no idea this films existed for a long time. My only run in with it was seeing the awesome looking poster art on the cover of its VHS. It was a little bit after that where I finally watched it and I wasn't disappointed. So I'm guessing the same will happen for you. Instead of watching terrifying super monsters chase a bunch of dumb people around a park for the fourth time in a row, watch some dinos hang out in the Natural History museum.  Besides it was produced under Steven Spielberg's Amblimation line and stars John Goodman, so you know that's a good sign. Clearly it's better than Jurassic World.  The Land Before Time Ugh, this movie is so saaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaad. Why would I recommend thiiiiiis? At the very least, I can argue that a young group of dinos that want to find their families will make you cry because it's well written and not because it's badly animated like Jurassic World. In fact, just cry this weekend and cut out the middle man.  Theodore Rex Remember this? Whoopi Goldberg wishes you didn't. Why not rub this terrible decision in her face while you pretend she's actually stuck in that one manga, Gantz. Or you can just keep crying since you're so alone and would rather write about a movie than go see one yourself. it's not like you have friends to go with you anyway.  Dinosaurs I remember when I had a family once. I used to watch movies with them all the time. I actually saw the first Jurassic Park with my dad. He didn't like it much, so it pretty much changed how I felt about it too. But you know what I had a good time with? ABC's Dinosaurs. If I remember correctly, it was part of the early TGIF block and had a lot of good puppet work. But they always get to be a happy family by episode's end. That's more than I ever got. God, I'm so lonely. My family. Where have you gone? I miss you so much.  Jurassic Park But the best choice is to deny the future and head back into the past. I was much happier back then. With my family, with my loving home, with my friends. Maybe if I watch Jurassic Park instead of Jurassic World, the future will never happen? I can trap time within this little capsule and repeat it for as long as I want! Everything new is old and everything old is new again!  Birth, life, death, rebirth, relife, redeath, rerebirth, rerelife, reredeath, rererebirth, rererelife, rereredeath, rerererebirth, rerererelife, rerereredeath, rererererebirth, rererererelife, rererereredeath Those are my suggestions for five things you can watch that aren't Jurassic World! Are you going to see it? 
Dinosaurs  photo
More than the world
While Jurassic World takes the *ahem* world by storm, I never really connected with the idea. I don't have as big of a connection with Jurassic Park as a lot of folks do, but at the same time, I love me some dinosaurs. Good t...

Ant-Man posters photo
Ant-Man posters

These Ant-Man posters are the best Ant-Man thing yet


Like Avengers? Then you'll blegggggggggg
Jun 12
// Nick Valdez
While Marvel's next film Ant-Man won't have The Avengers, Marvel doesn't want you to forget they exist in the same universe in case you somehow blacked out during the last five years of mass advertising. Either way, Ant-Man's...

Review: When Marnie Was There

Jun 12 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
[embed]219314:42335:0[/embed] When Marnie Was There (思い出のマーニー)Director: Hiromasa YonebayashiRelease Date: May 22, 2015Country: Japan In the wake of Hayao Miyakazi's retirement, Studio Ghibli has "temporarily" shuttered its doors. There may never be another Studio Ghibli film. There are probably people who are mad at Miyazaki for leaving. When Marnie Was There is a response to those people. It's a response to people who hold grudges and hate themselves and take it out on others. It's a a response to the fundamental negativity that drives much of modern society. And it made me cry.  It's easy to forget that cartoons can make you feel real people emotions if you don't watch many of them. And obviously calling a serious animated film like any Ghibli production a "cartoon" is reductive at best and borderline offensive at worst, but the point is that it isn't just the ultra-artistic works like Ghibli films that can get to you. They're probably about the best example, but it's just another toolset for a would-be filmmaker to use. And one that doesn't get nearly enough credit for the things it can do to you. When Marnie Was There starts in a place where the air is bad. It's a city, and Anna is a girl with asthma. She hates herself and keeps herself isolated from everyone around her. She has an asthma attack and the doctor tells her foster mother that she should be sent to the countryside. A countryside where there is nothing but Anna, nature, and whatever creepy, spirit-related things are going on in the town's abandoned buildings. (So far so Ghibli.) Before too long, Anna runs into Marnie, a blonde-haired girl who lives in the Marsh House, an old abandoned mansion at the edge of town. But, of course, Marnie isn't real. You know that. Anna knows that. The film knows it. Marnie's scenes are hyper-stylized, often dream-like, but knowing that she's not real actually makes everything more intriguing. Because the question isn't, "Is Marnie real?" It's, "Who is she?" Or perhaps, "Who was she?"    But what's never a question is what her role in Anna's arc is going to be. From the outset, it's obvious that Marnie is here to bring Anna out of her shell, to allow her to talk to others and stand up for herself and be brave. She's a self-loathing pre-teen. The world has enough of those. Marnie is there to help her come to terms with everything she's gone through. To give her some perspective. And its ability to put things into perspective without being contrived or annoying is When Marnie Was Here's greatest strength. Even in particularly expository moments, everything comes from a place of honesty in a valiant attempt to get at the fundamental beliefs we all have. A conversation between Marnie and Anna about the role of the parent begins a bit stiff, and I was worried that we were heading down the wrong path, but it ultimately turned into something exceedingly compelling. Whether it was critiquing an aspect of society found in both Japan and America, celebrating it, or simply accepting it is probably up for interpretation, but nothing in the film is skin-deep. It's all in service of these moments of revelation that turn both Anna and Marnie into an extremely compelling pair, even if the latter is "imaginary." But imaginary or not, Marnie's impact on Anna is tangible. As the truths behind Marnie's past become clearer, Anna begins to build up the strength to keep her partner safe from the evils of the world. Because there are always evils, no matter who you are or how you live. And even if you can't always fight them yourself, being able to recognize the plights of others and connect with them will make you a stronger person. Perhaps someone who can help others face their own demons as well. And when it all comes down to it, we're all in this together. Films like When Marnie Was There serve as reminders of just how meaningful life can be.
When Marnie Was There photo
All the places you'll go
Every so often, I think about old articles I've written, for Flixist or elsewhere, and wonder how different they would be if I'd written them now. Not from a grammatical or structural perspective. I wonder how my fundamental ...

Zootopia Teaser photo
Zootopia Teaser

First teaser trailer for Disney's Zootopia


"Be-fur"? Ughhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Jun 12
// Nick Valdez
While I still miss Disney's 2D animated style since Winnie the Pooh was great but not a film to end the legacy on, Disney's been hitting it out of the park with their CG efforts. They've found quite a groove with Wreck-It Ral...

Review: Jurassic World

Jun 12 // Per Morten Mjolkeraaen
Jurassic WorldDirector: Colin TrevorrowRelease Date: June 12, 2015Rated: PG-13 Jurassic World is set twenty-two years after the events in the first movie, and takes us back to Isla Nublar, now a fully functioning dinosaur theme park. It's been running successfully for years, but now visitor rates are declining because, as Bryce Dallas Howard's Claire puts it, "no one is impressed by dinosaurs anymore." This short, blink-and-you'll-miss-it piece of dialogue sets up the entire movie, from narrative to structure and concept. Because, on a narrative level, no one cares about dinosaurs anymore, a new attraction has to be revealed: a genetically-modified super-dinosaur! But as one can imagine, this super-dinosaur decides to break free and eat a lot of people. On a structural level, the fact that no one cares about dinosaurs anymore, allows director, Colin Trevorrow to make this movie without indulging in the inherent awe-inspiring nature of dinosaurs. Conceptually, as I said above, it speaks volumes about Jurassic World as a genre movie. The film is less related to its predecessors, but more so a close cousin to the modern high-concept monster-disaster movies.   The plot is simple, but I didn't expect - nor want - anything else. Two young boys (Ty Simpkins and Nick Robinson) arrive at Isla Nublar to experience the theme park in all its functioning glory, while Chris Pratt loves and respects his Raptors because he's just that chill and awesome and cool, and everyone loves Chris Pratt - even Raptors, which the previous Jurassic movies always said were the most dangerous dinosaurs of all. Even an uptight businesswoman like Claire has a soft spot for Chris Pratt, and she doesn't even want kids, nor does she know how old her nephews are, so you know she's an uptight businesswoman, because... character development.  This was my biggest concern going in, and unsurprisingly, it is my biggest fault with the movie as a whole. The characters are so poorly written and developed, it's almost offensive to the cast. There's no nicer way to put it, sadly. It's a real shame to see talented individuals like Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard, Vincent D'Onofrio, and Jake Johnson go to waste, because they're given nothing to work with here. They're all caricatures, stripped down to the most simplistic and banal. The worst has to be Bryce Dallas Howard, who I actually feel bad for. Dallas Howard is a nuanced and versatile actress, but any and all of her talent is tossed aside by the screenwriters. It's not exclusively lazy character development either, but rather the fact that she's created as she is to contrast and support the free-spirited nature of Chris Pratt's Owen. And of course Owen will change Claire "for the better" throughout the movie, because any business-focused woman who doesn't want children is an inherently bad person, and needs a man to change her. However bad that is, both Chris Pratt and Jake Johnson still managed to charm me from time to time, but that's only because Chris Pratt and Jake Johnson are my charming man-crushes, not because the movie does them any favors.  But let's talk positives: The movie is fun and action packed, and Chris Pratt is charming as hell. As soon as the super-dinosaur escapes and starts eating people, the movie gains a lot of points. I was really cynical about the idea of a genetically-modified dinosaur before seeing the movie, but I'll happily eat my own words of cynicism and criticism if it means a better movie, which is the case here. Having the big baddie be GM allowed for a lot of creative freedom to come up with and construct quite a few fun and original action set pieces. I'm always hesitant to say too much, but the so-called Idominus Rex has a few tricks up his sleeve (Disclaimer: Although the Idominus Rex has longer arms than the T-Rex, it does not have actual sleeves.)   Mr. Idominus Rex takes a stroll across the island, eating anyone who comes in its way. At one point he smashes through a huge aviary, allowing a flock of pterosaurs to fly wild across the island killing people. There is one scene, in this PG-13 movie, that albeit bloodless, is pure torture porn and really shocked me. Sadly, not in a good way. The rest of the pterosaur-attack is fresh and fun however, as the scary winged creatures has been sorely missing from the previous movies - save a few strange minutes in the third movie. As the conclusion comes closer, the humans, dinosaurs, and the super-dinosaur converge at the central plaza of the theme park, and it becomes a full-fledged Godzilla movie. It's grandiose and fun, but it's a formula that's been done to death, and Jurassic World adds nothing new to it. For those who want to see a simple, mindless monster-flick, I think this conclusion will satisfy, but for those wishing for something more, it lacks a lot.  Even with all its problems, there's a lot to like about Jurassic World. The scenes with the Idominus Rex in the wilderness are unique as far as dinosaurs killing things go and fun to watch. It's surprisingly well choreographed, and luckily, the CGI isn't terrible. There was a lot of talk about the CGI and its lack of detail in recent months, but it's clear that they've spent some time trying to fix it. While it still isn't the best, it seems more alive and works much better with its environment than we saw in the trailers - especially the fish-tank-dinosaur. However, as someone who always want CGI to be a last resort - a way for a director to enhance the practical - it is too obvious at times. It doesn't help the movie that we've been spoiled by George Miller and Mad Max: Fury Road recently, but for what it's worth, Jurassic World does well with what it has.  In the end, I think Jurassic World will split the audience. There's no doubt in my mind that tons and tons of people will love it, but I'm equally sure tons of people will dislike it. I fall in the middle. I found its venture into monster-flick-territory somewhat boring, judged by what it is - and not what I wanted it to be - it does its job decently. In a post-Fury Road effects and Godzilla-monster world, however, it doesn't reach those highs. Far from it. 
Jurassic World Review photo
At least it's not Jurassic Worst...
A few weeks ago, Mad Max: Fury Road became the fourth entry in a 30-year old franchise, "continuing" the story set up all those years ago. I don't think it is necessary for me to tell you just how much The Best...

Netflix Now photo
Netflix Now

Netflix Now: Limonada Edition


Netflix Instant additions for the week!
Jun 11
// Nick Valdez
Earlier this week, as police officers have a harder time in the news, police shut down two little girls' lemonade stand. The two little girls were trying to make some money to go to a water park in Texas, and they were shut d...
Screening photo
Screening

See Dope early and free


Washington DC and Baltimore screenings
Jun 11
// Matthew Razak
Dope came out of Sundance with a ton of good press, and when that happens it means the film is sure to be talked about around Oscar time so make sure you're in the loop. You can grab some passes to what folks are calling...
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Chris Hemsworth to be hunky in Ghostbusters


Thor is the new receptionist
Jun 11
// Matt Liparota
Paul Feig's upcoming all-female Ghostbusters won't settle for gender-swapping just the main characters. Chris Hemsworth has joined the cast as the new team's receptionist, filling the slot originally held by Annie Potts in th...
U.N.C.L.E. photo
U.N.C.L.E.

New trailer for Man from U.N.C.L.E. spies its way in


Sure looks pretty
Jun 11
// Matthew Razak
Things I am not entirely sold on: my standing desk and The Man from U.N.C.L.E. movie.  While I was OK with the Sherlock Holmes films Guy Ritchie still isn't a director who gets me excited anymore. The movie definite...
Doctor Strange photo
Doctor Strange

Chiwetel Ejiofor will play villain Mordo in Doctor Strange


MWAHAHAHAHA
Jun 11
// Matthew Razak
Doctor Strange is the next film to start shooting for Marvel and that means the details be coming. Casting for the film has taken awhile, but we know that Benedict Cumberbatch will be playing the titular hero and that Ch...

RIP Christopher Lee (1922-2015)

Jun 11 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]219552:42431:0[/embed]   And, of course... [embed]219552:42432:0[/embed]
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The legend was 93 years old
Sir Christopher Lee has passed away at the age of 93. Lee died in the hospital on Sunday, June 7th, though word of his passing has only reached news outlets today. According to several reports, this was at the request of Lee'...

Zootopia photo
Zootopia

New Zootopia image introduces us to Disney's latest


It's a bunny cop movie
Jun 10
// Matthew Razak
Disney Animation has been on quite a roll -- you know, that little movie called Frozen -- and while we won't be seeing anything from them until next year that doesn't mean we can't start to get excited. Personally I...

First TV Spot for Spectre

Jun 10 // Per Morten Mjolkeraaen
007 photo
Explosions and Bond girls confirmed!
James Bond is set to return with Spectre later this year, and as the 24th instalment in the franchise, it is unsurprisingly on a lot of people's "most anticipated lists" - mine included. Now we have some new footage to drool ...

Gilliam/Amazon deal photo
Gilliam/Amazon deal

Amazon will help fund and release Terry Gilliam's The Man Who Killed Don Quixote


And a Defective Detective series too?
Jun 10
// Hubert Vigilla
Terry Gilliam's quest to make The Man Who Killed Don Quixote has run into countless stumbling blocks. First chronicled in the 2002 documentary Lost in La Mancha, Gilliam and others have suggested Don Quixote is back on track ...
Batman v. Superman pics photo
Batman v. Superman pics

New Batmobile and Wonder Woman costume pics from Batman v. Superman


Pics from The Licensing Expo in Vegas
Jun 09
// Hubert Vigilla
There's a bit more Superman v. Batman news today in case you haven't gotten your fix yet. In addition to the official plot synopsis for Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice, Collider snapped some pics of the Batmobile and the ...
Goodbye Earth photo
Goodbye Earth

First Independence Day promotional art ups the ante a bit


They're back
Jun 09
// Matthew Razak
While we've got a ways to go before Independence Day 2 brings us more independence than we can handle the marketing teams are gearing up. Early promotional art for the film was on display at the Licensing Expo in La...
BvS photo
BvS

Batman v. Superman official plot lays it all out


What kind of hero do we need?
Jun 09
// Matthew Razak
It's pretty hard to imagine that we didn't yet have an official plot synopsis for Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice given how much hype (including the trailer and posters) we've already had for the movie, but the fact is we...
Hunger Games  photo
Welcome to the 76th Hunger Games.
Last week we saw a beautiful poster for the fourth and final instalment of the Hunger Games franchise, Mockingjay - Part 2. Now we have the first trailer, and it promises tons of action and confrontations, as Katniss Everdeen...

NYAFF 2015 photo
NYAFF 2015

The 2015 New York Asian Film Festival lineup and schedule are here


My favorite festival of the year returns
Jun 08
// Alec Kubas-Meyer
The New York Asian Film Festival is very near and dear to my heart. When I started at Flixist in 2011, I was a news writer. I wasn't supposed to be writing reviews or doing any of that high-minded stuff. But then my girlfrie...
Box Office Numbers photo
Box Office Numbers

Box Office Numbers: Spy vs. Spy


Jun 08
// Nick Valdez
Another week gone, another week of box office numbers. Unsurprisingly, the Melissa McCarthy movie Spy (which apparently isn't as bad as her recent string of bad choices) took the top spot with $30 million, San Andreas is stil...
Bridge of Spies photo
Bridge of Spies

First trailer for Bridge of Spies


Spielberg, the Coens and Hanks
Jun 08
// Per Morten Mjolkeraaen
Bridge of Spies is directed by Steven Spielberg, written by Joel and Ethan Coen (and Matt Charman) and it stars Tom Hanks. Names most everyone knows and respects to a certain degree, which means it is automatically positioned...
AHHHHHHHHH photo
Power levels over 9000
Tom Cruise held his breathe for six minutes during the filming of Mission: Impossible -- Rogue Nation. It was for some underwater part and he actually did it leading us to believe that he is some sort of Scientology super sai...

The Martian Trailer photo
There was supposed to be a kaboom.
Although Ridley Scott has had a few misses lately, his adaptation of Andy Weir's The Martian might shape up to be quite a film. It's got a great cast with Matt Damon, Jessica Chastain, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Kristen Wiig, Kate Mar...

Review: Doomsdays

Jun 05 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
[embed]219533:42421:0[/embed] DoomsdaysDirector: Eddie MullensRelease Date: June 5, 2015Rating: NR  Doomsdays wears its Wes Anderson influences on its sleeve. The meticulous, often symmetrical compositions and indie score serve as a reminder that there is a filmmaker out there who many people call an auteur. But it's reductive to just think about this film in terms of Wes Anderson. It's Haneke's Wes Anderson, for sure, but who I really kept coming back to was neither of those directors; it was Christian Mungiu, director of one of my favorite films of all time: 4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days. But it didn't remind me of that film so much as his follow-up, Beyond the Hills. What struck me about Beyond the Hills was how real it all felt. The reality came primarily from the use of extreme long takes (Mungiu knows how to do a gosh damn long take) and the moments that would take place within them. There's a particular moment where a bunch of characters build a cross and then tie another character to that cross. The whole thing happens in one shot. And as I watched it, I thought, "They only did this once, right? It's way too freaking complicated. The lumber costs alone would make multiple takes impractical." Turns out they averaged upwards of 40 takes of each shot, because they didn't get enough rehearsal time and so the first few (dozen) takes were his rehearsal. But even so, it was the feeling that this wasn't just a shot that was done over and over and over again that sold it. The moment felt natural, real, and horrific. Every extra action in a long take requires setup. A character takes off their jacket, their tie, their shoes. Each of these things must be put back into place before the take can be redone. It's complicated, and it requires a lot of time. But it's those little moments that make it feel real. Because you're not thinking about that work that went into setting up the scene. You're just thinking about the scene itself. It feels real. Even if they had to do 16 takes to get it right. By contrast, I'm reasonably sure that every single shot in Doomsdays was done precisely once. The opening shot, a car pulls up, two people get out. They go to their door, see that someone has broken in. They go inside. And then a window shatters, and two people come out. One of them runs up to the car, pulls out a knife, and jams it into the tire. It deflates. They run off.  Doomsdays is a low-budget film. They raised just $22,000 on Kickstarter. But in the opening shot, they shatter a window and stab a tire. And that's just the start. This is a film with dozens of locations, and the protagonists damage nearly every single one. And I spent most of the time thinking about how horribly wrong everything could have gone while being consistently impressed with just how much mayhem they committed on what must have been, again, a very low budget. Because it's the kind of film that only gets made on a low budget, because the audience is, by design, rather small.  Dirty Fred and Bruho wander through rural-ish towns and break into homes. They stay there for a day or two, raid the fridge, liquor storage, and medicine cabinet, and then go off to the next place. They have no real home and no destination. They walk everywhere, because Bruho hates cars. (Hence puncturing that tire in the opening shot.) There are character arcs (though much of the actual arcing takes place in back half of the movie and feels occasionally rushed), but there's not much of a narrative arc. They get some more companions and things happen and escalate, but it all feels relatively inconsequential. The ultimate life decisions (one of which feels far more genuine than the other) should be momentous, but they aren't. They're just things that happen.  This isn't a bad thing, to be clear. It's just a reminder that this is a film with a very particular audience. It's a film for people who are okay with occasionally rough performances, because beyond those rough performances are moments of brilliance. In Cannibal Holocaust, there's a moment where one of the characters shoots a pig. He actually did that. And then, just for a second, he breaks character, clearly affected by it. But the shot isn't over. He still has to monologue. But they only had the one pig, so that's the take that ended up in the film. Doomsdays doesn't have anything quite so obvious, but I expect there were moments where director Eddie Mullens thought, "Well... it is what it is." Each shot builds to something. The longer the take, the more likely something destructive is to happen within it. At the end of 45 seconds, someone throws a brick through a window. And you know what? That may well have been some random person's window. The imperfections actually serve to make the whole thing feel more real. Not realistic, per se, but more like a series of events that actually took place. They broke that window (and that other window (and that other one)), they destroyed that car, and they broke all those glasses and vases and whatever else got in their way. I saw them happen with my own eyes, not in real life, but in a real document of those actions. It's a meticulously composed documentary about rebels without a cause. And it's absolutely fascinating.
Doomsdays Review photo
It's time to sing The Doom Song now
I get emails pretty much daily asking me if I want to review this film or that. Most of the time, I ignore those emails. Periodically, I glance at them and then ignore them. When you've read thousands of press releases, it be...

Review: Spy

Jun 05 // Matthew Razak
SpyDirector: Paul FeigRated: RRelease Date: June 5, 2016 The amount of ways that Spy could have gone horribly, horribly wrong are pretty high. It's a spy movie parody featuring an overweight woman full of crass humor. If this had come out with a different director we'd be looking at an insulting, pandering piece of comedic trash, but instead Feig makes Spy a clever and resoundingly unique experience capitalizing on McCarthy's comedic skills and charm.  McCarthy plays Susan Cooper, a CIA agent who spends her time behind the desk talking into Bradley Fine's (Jude Law) earpiece as he goes on daring and dramatic missions. When Bradley is killed, however, Susan must go out into the field to hunt down Rayna Boyanov (Rose Byrne) and take revenge. Throw in a fantastically comical Jason Statham as a rogue CIA agent out for revenge, and you've got an amazing mix of comedic actors hamming it up while still offering a surprising amount of competent (and graphic) action sequences.  What Spy does best is completely invert what it "should" be doing. A cursory glance at the film would make you think it's a bland spy film parody, but Spy isn't a parody as much as it is a comedic spy film. Instead of mocking conventions with bad site gags and an inept spy as most spy parodies do it plays into them and then finds its comedy elsewhere. Instead of offering up tepid action sequences and fights it goes full bore as if it were actually an action movie. There are some sequences here that the steadily worsening Michael Bay could take some lessons from, especially since the film earns a hard R through violence. It's still the comedy that sells, and Spy's comedy just works. There are fat jokes, but they aren't at the expense of McCarthy. The humor isn't driven by her being a fish out of water as a spy, but instead through actual clever comedy. Feig and McCarthy have some of the best timing together and it shows throughout the movie, even in the beginning when things start off a bit slow. Once the obligatory gadget collecting scene rolls in you won't be able to stop laughing. Once Jason Statham starts rattling off his nigh-impossible spy missions you'll be on the floor. Spy also offers a refreshingly female driven narrative for a genre that is obviously male obsessed. This should probably be expected from Feig, but the director once again delivers. In another instance of eschewing the norm Peggy doesn't rely on any man to save her at any time. This doesn't mean that the film ignores sex jokes or inappropriate behavior, but instead celebrates it as comedic. One of the things Feig's comedies do best is tow the line between inappropriate and hilarious, something another film opening this weekend could have learned from.  You probably weren't expecting such a glowing review of the film. McCarthy has felt tired in her last outings and the advertising for this one did nothing to make one think it was something special. Turns out the ads can be wrong and that McCarthy still has plenty of juice in her tank... as long as she's taking on good projects.  
Spy photo
Like a good spy, you don't see it coming
Over the past few years I've grown increasingly tired of Melissa McCarthy's shtick. I figured this was because I was tired of her, but it turns out she's just been making mediocre movies. Her shtick still works when someone i...

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Ron Perlman wants to make Hellboy 3 happen


The question is, should he?
Jun 05
// Matt Liparota
Hey, do you remember Hellboy? You know, the mildly successful 2004 adaptation of the Dark Horse comic book franchise directed by Guillermo del Toro? Well, star Ron Perlman sure does, and it looks like he's ready to get back i...

Review: Entourage

Jun 05 // Matthew Razak
[embed]219534:42423:0[/embed] EntourageDirector: Doug EllinRated: RRelease Date: June 3, 2015 Entourage focuses on Vince (Adrian Grenier) and his entourage: Eric (Kevin Connolly), Johnny Drama (Kevin Dillon) and Turtle (Jerry Ferrara). The show was about Vince's rise to fame after being discovered by agent Ari Gold (Jeremy Piven). From what I've seen of it it basically was about the four guys driving around acting like assholes, but having everything work out for them. The film is basically the exact same thing, but on a bigger scale. Ari is now the head of a film studio and he wants Vince to make his first movie, but Vince won't do it unless he can direct. Ari acquiesces and we jump forward a few an unspecified amount of time to Vince running out of money and Ari having to go to the films financiers, Travis Mcredel (Haley Joel Osment) and his father (Billy Bob Thorton) to beg for more money. Unfortunately Travis is sent back with Ari to see the movie and starts causing trouble. This doesn't actually effect anyone that much except for Ari, so the rest of the crew spends the film hitting on women, driving a crazy cool Cadillac and having sex. What was always the most confusing thing about Entourage is that it never seemed to have a point, and this film suffers from the same problem unless it's sole point was more Entourage. If that's the case then well done, but I'm guessing it wasn't. The movie is neither satire or straight comedy. It has not true dramatic push and makes no attempt at developing its characters. It's only theme seems to be cramming cameos into every shot and its only message is that celebrities get to have a slot of sex and date Rhonda Rousey. If that's what you're going in for then you'll be pleased, but as someone looking for an actual movie out the experience you're going to be very disappointed. The film's lack of narrative focus and avoidance of any attempt at self awareness is also problematic because it can't quite handle its rampant sexism and racism. The point, it seems, is to send up the ridiculousness that is Hollywood, but the movie is never clever enough or interesting enough to do that. It replaces interesting female characters with cameos and any attempts at constructing a plot that seems to move forward are derailed by subplots that seem entirely pointless. Maybe a fan of the show would be attached to them since they're already attached to the characters, but anyone else will just wonder why we should care. That's not to say that all of Entourage doesn't work. Piven's Ari Gold is easily one of the best characters to come out of television, and the film makers obviously know this. He gets more screen time than anyone else and milks it fantastically. Granier seems almost useless as the rest of the cast plays around him, but only Dillon's character's subplot is actually somewhat interesting with the other two entourage members having needles story lines thrown around, and this despite the fact that one of them involves Rousey.  It's very clear that those who watched the show will get a lot more out of the film than I did, but for those that didn't it's probably best to just stay away or keep it for a rental. There's nothing new or interesting here to latch onto and in the end the film feels more like a reunion special than a movie. That's all well and good for fans, but when someone is shelling out a full ticket price they should expect a bit more.
Entourage photo
Someone should make a TV show about this
Let me just stop you right there, fan of HBO's Entourage. I never watched the show so this review is probably rather pointless from your point of view. Sure, I saw a few episodes here and there, but I really have no attachmen...


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