community

 photo

[This contest is now OVER! Congrats to our three winners and thanks to everyone for reading! - Liz] Good evening, fair Flixians! This time we bring you a contest to win a copy of Sleep Tight on Blu-ray for your viewing pleasu...

 photo

[This contest is now OVER! Congrats to our winner TehAnt1the1s1s!] Hey ladies and gents! Today we have a special giveaway of a prize-pack for the Saw franchise's blood brother The Collection. All you have to do is retweet thi...

 photo

Nihonjinron: J-Horror


Nov 30
// dj-anon
[Flixist community member dj-anon just keeps churning out these sweet essays about Japanese cinema and culture, if you haven't taken a glance at his look at the Japanese Horror genre, you should!] Part 9: The Art of Fear The...
 photo
Creepiest prize ever
[This contest is now over! Congratulations to our winner! Keep an eye out for more contests!] Hello fair citizens of Flixist! Today we bring you a pretty special contest, one in which you need Twitter to enter. Yes, I know, b...

 photo

[This contest is now over! Congrats to our winner SirCacophony!] Hey everyone! We have the opportunity for you to enter to win a free copy of Iron Sky -- everyone's favorite Space Nazi movie -- on either DVD or Blu-ray and a ...

 photo

Bloggers Wanted: Speaking My Language


Sep 28
// Liz Rugg
[September is almost over! Hurry up and write your community blogs about subtitles for a chance to be featured on our front page!] Subtitles. They're kind of a contested thing. Some people hate them, some people love them, an...
 photo

[Update: We got upgraded to a larger house! There are less than forty tickets left, and the screening is in one week!] Hey, fellow Los Angeles denizens! Remember that time we went to see The FP together with Jonathan Lon...

 photo

Best/Worst Summer 2012: I've Got a Head in My Bag


Sep 07
// Cacophony
[Community member Cacophony did an awesome job recapping his thoughts of Summer 2012 movies on his community blog, and as a result, here it is on the front page for everyone to see! Great job Cacophony! You can get a chance...
 photo

Bloggers Wanted: Best/Worst of Summer 2012


Aug 31
// Liz Rugg
[Reminder! Last chance to tell us what you thought about 2012's summer movies. Awesome blogs will be featured on the front page!] Sad to say it, but with August comes the eventual ending of Summer. People will be going back t...
 photo

[This contest is now closed! Congrats to our winner - G K! Thanks for reading and look out for more contests soon! -Liz Rugg] Hey there! Do you like Space Nazis? 'Course you do! Who doesn't like malicious groups of Nazis who ...

 photo

The Flixist Batcast #12: The Dark Knight


Jul 18
// Xzyliac
[For the past several months, in the run up to The Dark Knight Rises, community member and Team Hobbit Sucks Brave Rules captain Xzyliac has been running a podcast recording commentary tracks for each Batfilm(all of which you...
 photo

Listen to all of the Flixist Batcasts in time for DKR!


Jul 16
// Alex Katz
Man, The Dark Knight Rises comes out this Friday. It's hard to believe it's been four years since The Dark Knight. This is an exciting time for a Batfan. As such, I want to point you towards a podcast that's been going o...
 photo

Bloggers Wanted: Summer Movies


Jun 11
// Liz Rugg
[I've decided to be "generous" and give you all until the end of this week to write up your Summatime blogs! Hurry up and enter!] Yay! It's Summertime! Hot days, short shorts, no school, and plenty of time to watch movies. Fo...
 photo

Breakups: Nick Valdez vs. The World


Jun 11
// Nick Valdez
[In this month's Bloggers Wanted Response, Nick Valdez tells us an inspiring story of love, loss, and Scott Pilgrim vs. The World. Check out this month's Bloggers Wanted Assignment for your chance to get a blog on the front p...
 photo

Flixist now has a chat bar! Tell us about your day.


May 11
// Jenika Katz
The migration to our new editing software gave us a special treat, and we didn't even notice. What's this new feature that has literally been sitting quietly in the corner? Why, a chat feature, of course! That's right: now yo...

Humanimals: Paulie

May 02 // Nick Valdez
Slight spoilers follow. Paulie follows the story of the fluent English speaking parrot, Paulie, as he struggles to relocate his former owner Marie (Hallie Kate Eisenberg, otherwise known as the little girl from the Pepsi commercials) because he was separated from her by her parents. Through that adventure he meets a kindly old woman (Gena Rowlands), a latino in East LA (Cheech Marin, who manages to find his way into every movie with talking animals), and a con man who wants to use the parrot for financial gains (Jay Mohr). Although the film's premise seems a little "nineties," I couldn't help but be enthralled by it. As a main character, Paulie is just enchanting. There are nuances with the character that are normally reserved for human actors. Paulie the parrot comes off as a curious child whose outlook on the world is influenced by well spoken mentors. Every facet of his adventure almost comes off as the monomyth (hero's journey) in which Paulie faces challenges where he needs to evolve in order to overcome them. For example during a few scenes, Paulie gets involved in a string of robberies. His voiceover states that he needed "the green stuff" to help find his owner. It is not until later in the film that he learns he was doing wrong things, but it is hard to fault him for it. Paulie only learns through the help of others, and here he was in the care of the con man, Benny. It's like when a juvenile gets arrested for a crime, and the first response is to blame the parents for their shortcomings. A plot like the one in Paulie has the potential for timelessness. However, there are a bunch of odd choices that really prevent that timeless quality from really flourishing. In fact, some of it is borderline offensive.   I mentioned earlier that the film's plot was very "nineties". What I meant by that was that there are allusions to the culture of the time that dates it to that period. Every single character in this film has an accent for some reason. Ignacio and the entirety of "East LA," are "illegals". That means that Marin has to give his character a strong accent that he normally doesn't have. Marin is an eloquent speaker when he's allowed to be, and I personally hate to see this happen. Benny's girlfriend Ruby (Tia Texada), even has a quasi Rosie Perez "semi-Spanglish" accent. And as much as I like Paulie's character, I have a strong disdain for his voice. I'm not sure if he's supposed to sound like he's got giant rocks in his mouth, but if that is the case, Jay Mohr successfully plays it well. Speaking of Jay Mohr, his other character Benny has a weird "New Yorker" accent that is apparently necessary. It's especially noticeable during moments when he is talking to himself as Paulie and Benny exchange words. The biggest offender by far though is Tony Shaloub's Misha. Misha Vilyenkov is a Russian immigrant custodian whom Paulie tells his life's story to. I despise his accent for some reason. It just seems too forced for me to ignore. At one point, he says the word "mango" and I wanted to shoot my computer screen. The accents stand out far more now than they used to, and it shows the film hasn't aged too well. Pictured: D'awww. Never mind all of that "flaw" talk. Once you get past the creepy animatronics, slightly depressing ending, and baffling accents, Paulie isn't half bad. It's a great testament to the company that Dreamworks used to be. You know, before it began its slew of same looking animated films. I like the sum of its parts, even if I don't care for all of that parts (if that even makes sense). All those years ago, Paulie made me reconsider my view of "humanimals". I thought I could be friends with them, given the chance. After re-watching it, I still think could be friends with sentient, eloquent animals...as long as their accents don't irritate me.
 photo

[It's time once again for our monthly Nick Valdez blog promotion! Just kidding, you're awesome Nick. But seriously guys, if you want to be on Flixist's front page, it's pretty easy! All you've got to do is write a blog about ...

DC Friends: Win passes to a screening of Safe

Apr 19 // Matthew Razak
Gofobo code is: FLXT2KTH Screening info: Wednesday, April 25thRegal Gallery Place, 707 Seventh Street NW, Washington, DC7:30 p.m.
 photo

We've got another set of passes for you fine folks in the Washington DC area. This time around we have tickets to the new Jason Statham action flick Safe. If you're a fan of Statham protecting people other people, which is pr...

 photo

My friend Jonathan London over at Geekscape and I hatched a plan: host a screening of The FP, the Citizen Kane of "wait, what the f**k did I just watch?" right here in our home of Los Angeles. Thankfully, our frien...

 photo

The Award Goes to ... Winnie the Pooh


Apr 09
// Nick Valdez
[For last month's Blogger's Wanted, Andrew Kauz (RIP) asked the Flixist community to respond to this year's award shows by giving an award of their own. Nick Valdez chose to award one of the most overlooked movies of 2011; Wi...
 photo

Bloggers Wanted: Humanimals


Apr 02
// Liz Rugg
For my first Bloggers Wanted call as the new Community Manager, I'm going to go with a topic that hits close to my heart. Humanimals. What is a Humanimal, you ask? well, it's basically any combination of humans and animals, w...

Drive: Surfing the surface of the 'superhero' genre

Mar 30 // Nathsies
I think Drive is, at times, an overtly pretentious art film with eighties synth soundtrack blurring and blending into this confusing mess of absolute joyous romanticism, violence and anarchistic mythologising of the ‘superhero’. It shows the relationship between Gosling and Mulligan’s characters through silences and the eyes, truly hitting straight into real life. Drive then, eventually, shows a man getting his head blown to a bloody pulp by the hero’s boot. Hero. The hammer of anarchism is struck straight into the core of the ‘superhero’ and no longer is there any government, rules or laws or restrictions or order to satisfy the Driver. What I’m talking about is an entire deconstruction of superhero mythology and, then, an entirely new evolutionary exploration emerging throughout Drive. Identity and Causality The typical ‘secret identity’ that comic book superheroes have paraded for a near century is completely destroyed in Drive. Clark Kent is in the glasses, Batman in the mask, Spider-Man in the spandex suit and so on and so forth. Identity is used as a barrier between the human and the superhuman (unless you’re Superman in which case you’re 100% supers), so that both the man can transform into the superhero but also the superhero has a cushion to come back to. In this cushion there can be relationships with human beings, a day job, grocery shopping, education… working at a garage and almost becoming a race car driver. Hint. Hint. As Peter Parker himself says “If my enemies found out about you… if you got hurt,I could never forgive myself.”[2] the cushion is both a curse and a blessing. While no enemies can hunt down the ‘hero’, they can hunt down the man behind the mask (eventually) and this will destroy everything around the hero. In Drive, as soon as the Driver is found to be interlinked there is a strike against the only thing he holds dear: Irene. Once this happens, the Driver does whatever he can to protect her. Following this is a series of violent incidents, murders and chases across the city and a final confrontation with Bernie Rose. ‘Bernie Rose’ is probably the most comforting name for an antagonist ever. I cannot help but think of Weekend at Bernies when I hear that name. Identity then is the line between hero and human, a barrier if you will. To break that barrier there is the mask, and masks are absolutely crucial to understanding Drive. Irene’s child wears one, the stuntman mask that Driver wears pops in throughout (we’ll discuss that in a minute) and perhaps not just ‘masks’ but clothing in general. Clothing transforms the character of the Driver, it gives him a feeling. The toothpick and the gloves and the jacket, notice how he doesn’t even wear gloves during mechanical work or when he’s driving Irene during the first ‘Real Hero’ scene.   I call it the ‘Travolta’ mask. I just can’t help it.[3] The ‘Travolta’ mask confused me at this. I didn’t really understand why the Driver needed this mask, but then I recalled my knowledge of the superhero. This mask is the barrier between the human and the superhero, but better than that, it is another identity. Another identity that the responsibility for all the actions, all the hatred and all the violence. If you can then catch the BBC Miniseries Luther, especially the first two episodes of Series Two, it’s a show utterly about identity and how it’s reflected in the environment. In one such episode, a killer cannot bring himself to actually kill without a mask and that’s what I think happens in Drive. The gloves, the mask and the jacket all hide the Driver from himself. The causality between his actions and identity are absolutely paramount; the identity is the cause, the violence is the effect. The Driver, upon assuming the new identity, can then do as he pleases. Important to note the elevator scene in which the Driver kisses Irene, his human relationship (the ‘cushion’) and then turns his back on her to become enraged. He knows he cannot protect her as a human, so he becomes a real hero. Do you understand what I mean? In order to save his ‘cushion’, he has to turn his back on it. He has to become a real hero and, by the end of it all, he completes this. The track Real Hero by College (feat Electric Youth) comes at both the point of Driver’s emotional peak in his falling for Irene, but also at the end of the film when he finally completes himself. When he succeeds in protecting her, going off into the night to be hunted… I wonder what that reminds me of…[4] Identity itself is the causality of everything that the Driver commits in Drive. Note how he puts on his gloves before interrogating Blanche in the hotel room. Just like in every superhero movie, he needs to cover up his human form so he can commit such acts. Interesting further to note the name of ‘Driver’, that we never find out his true name. Probably a throwback to the Clint Eastwood trilogy ‘Man With No Name’, a chaotic hero himself (we might discuss that trilogy soon), but without this true ‘identity’, without a name… Driver is free of his humanity. But humanity is both a curse and a blessing, as we’ve said, and this is why I believe Drive to puncture the surface of the superhero genre. Because the Driver becomes a real hero… perhaps forever. Mythology "A key ideological myth of the superhero comic is that the normal and everyday enshrines positive values that must be defended through heroic action–and defended over and over again almost without respite against an endless battery of menaces determined to remake the world for the benefit of aliens, mutants, criminals, or sub-aqua beings from Atlantis."- Richard Reynolds, Superheroes: A Modern Mythology [5]  ’Positive values’. In the instance of Drive, it is love that is a positive values. Nice how Reynolds mentions the ‘criminals’, nicely fitting in to Drive as a superhero movie. His entire book is a great read up on the superhero mythology, unfortunately he fails to address how exactly it has changed over time. What’s interesting to note are two bits ‘heroic action’ and ‘determined to remake the world’.‘Heroic action’ in Drive is violent beatings… the same with The Dark Knight too but without the death really. Except ‘heroic’ as a word doesn’t really mean anything. What is the line between heroic and human? I would hazard to say it’s the blurring of the lines, the identity, and thus the causality. Instead, however, I think ‘heroic’ in Drive means righteous in oneself. The act of Driver beating up, murdering and covering it up with identity is all done heroically. It is a bad to defend the ‘positive values’, the love which seems almost alien to him at first. This is true for Spider-Man, The Dark Knight and the vast majority of the Superman series. They are defending their love of their partners.Except Spidey and Supes are not just out to save their love from total destruction, but also their dwellings. For Spidey it’s the entire city, where he countless times defends the city… but for what cause? Supes defends the entire Earth… but for what cause? Spidey tries to fulfill Uncle Ben’s last words, I guess, but Superman doesn’t even have a home. Is he trying to do it some justice? The superhero mythology gets a little bit weird in that the ‘positive values that must be defended’ can both be the love of the Driver and Irene but also the day-to-day life of millions of citizens. That society itself should be defended.   But Drive is 100% personal. It’s about the Driver defending his own turf, his love and himself. He wants to get out, he’s just an average everyday guy… this is what separates Drive from other superhero flicks. This is what it evolves from. The Driver is 100% human. He does not have powers or gadgets or any attribute that would classify him as a true ‘superhero’. He uses identity as a means to both save himself and Irene, but he’s more human than human. He defends, in the end, his humanity and accepts that this is his true purpose. That he can chase his humanity for so long, but it will always evade him. He cannot touch it any longer, because it will harm it, and so he goes off into the distance to be hunted possibly forever. As a Psychology-studying seventeen year old, it’s somewhat fun to insert a bit of psychological reading of mythology. It’s been covered by a lot of commenters on the film but I’d like to truly apply it. I am talking about how the title of ‘Drive‘ feeds into the psychology of the character and from my own knowledge there is such a thing as Drive theory[6]. “Drive theory is based on the principle that organisms are born with certain psychological needs and that a negative state of tension is created when these needs are not satisfied.” The mythology of the superhero, then, is not entirely built around this ‘nature’ approach to our brains. Superheroes, mostly, aren’t born with a desire[7] or need to be a ‘hero’, a need to defend everything. It is built out of a personal desire or fear. Batman with Bats, Spider-Man with his Uncle. Stuff like that. But the Driver? We’re all born with a need for love… when that love it taken away, we revert to that ‘negative state of tension’. It’s like when you get straight out of a great relationship and mope around for a bit, because it takes a while for your brain to dilute those ‘psychological needs’ away from the need of a particular somebody. In short, the superhero mythology isn’t particularly built out of Drive theory… a theory which (I’m being reductionist here) addresses the very issue of our humanity. That when we don’t have it, we can’t even act human. Evolution “Superheroes may be a prelude to an actual leap in our evolution.”- Deepak Chopra. [8] Biologically, human beings aren’t going to evolve for millions of years. Only then do we become super-powered beings. Except, then, would we lose our humanity? We’d lose our contemporary humanity, certainly, but would we lose love, foolishness, lust and all those stupid, stupid things that makes us human? If we’re all superheroes then… will there be a world to save? “When everyone’s super… well… no-one will be!” [9] Drive takes the superhero mythology and the idea of identity and evolves it into the human sense. That final drive away into the distance, wounded and bloodied, with the soundtrack ebbing the background. It’s all built around evolving the driver into a real hero… and a real human being. Becoming a superhero flick is not enough for the film, it has to change it. The film is a perfect reflection of our own day-to-day battle with our humanity against the brutal onslaught of time. To become a hero, we must accept the ruthlessness of time. We must agree that whatever has happened… happened. Only then can we move on with our lives. Move on from our past. A soundtrack trapped in the eighties, a subtle nod at action flicks and a direct punch to the gut of modern society in the form of the gangsterism (I had no idea that was a word) that has an iron grip on the city and on the humanity itself. It reminds me of Blade Runner in the sense of the ending. Where Deckard turns his back on the system that he has been a part of for so long, and instead flees with his humanity intact. The only difference between Drive and Blade Runner being that Deckard physically gets the girl in the end, whereas Driver has to be contempt in knowing that he saved her life but (to be ‘a real human being, and a real heroooo’) he has to accept the pursuit. Accept his humanity and what he’s done. In short, he must abandon his civilian life and become the Driver forever. Ever evading the pursuers behind him. And that is Drive. A puncture wound on the superhero mythology, an almost post-modernist kick to the groin and whatever else imagery you can think of. It’s a truly evolutionary thought captured in a feature that is both violent, romantic and both modern and regressive. It’s all about the line between human and hero, and in the end, hero and real hero. Batman, Spider-Man and so on and so forth have all been blessed with decades worth of lore and mythological explorations, but it’s time to turn it down a bit. For Drive, that isn’t enough. It might even be in the entirely wrong direction. What Drive suggests and investigates is truly transcendent. To be a real hero, you have to be a real human being. References, further reading: 1. Digital Spy Interview 2. Spider-Man 2 3. Hehe 4. The Dark Knight 5. Link to Online book here 6. Overview from Wikipedia. 7. One of the tracks in Drive… 8. IGN Article on Comic Con 9. The Incredibles I’m not sure what to think of this film essaying stuff. I rather enjoyed researching and watching all those lovely films but… I don’t know if this should take the place of Film Critique Corner? A filmy essay every two weeks? What do you think, leave comments below or whatever. I was thinking of doing the Man With No Name trilogy, focusing entirely around the space between name and non-name or something like that. Anyway, let me know if I was incoherent and generally quite terrible with writing this… honest feedback is appreciated.
 photo

[Sometimes, when people write awesome stuff on our community blogs, we promote them to the front page! Here is a great example of a well thought out, well executed blog about Drive by our own community member Nathsies. Show u...

 photo

[UPDATE: We still need 72 more RSVPs for this event to happen. If you know anyone in the Boston area that either lives there or is going to PAX East, let them know about this! It's going to be an awesome night!] We are big fa...

Important Announcement Regarding the Flixist Community!

Mar 28 // Liz Rugg
You guys are the lifeblood of this place. Without our community, Flixist would shrivel up and die like so many vaginas filled with extra-salty tears. You guys and gals are the reason we're all here! What I'm trying to say here is ... well, I'm taking over as the new Community Manager here at Flixist. Andrew Kauz is a dear friend of mine, and his torch will not go un... torched. I want to make this community bigger and better than it ever was before! You guys are already writing awesome, awesome blogs, full of insightful ideas and thoughtful commentary. KEEP IT UP. Get your friends to join. Spread a blog that you're particularly proud of around the Internet. Flixist has come a long way in the past year and a half-ish, and we're only just getting started! Help us make this place even better than it already is! If you have any ideas for us about how to make the Flixist community better - tell us! Send me a message, email ([email protected]), or comment below! If you have any ideas - or anything you just like to say - to me as the new CM, lemme have it! I am really, REALLY excited to be starting this adventure with you guys, and I can't wait to read all of your incredible blogs as well as get to know everyone better! I've got some big hot dog buns to fill, that's for sure.
 photo

Hello and Hi.I'm Liz Rugg, most of you may remember me from such great hits as The Front Page and Flixist Staff. Some of you, however, may remember me in my early days, when I was once a humble community blogger such as yours...

 photo

The Descendants just landed on DVD a few days ago and to celebrate we have two copies of the film to give away. In case you missed it this is definitely one of the best films of last year and according to our very own awards ...

 photo

You've read our Project X review and our roundtable discussion with the cast, you're planning on seeing the movie, and now you're probably in the mood to RAGE. Luckily, Flixist has you covered... somewhat. After attendin...

 photo

Bloggers Wanted: The award goes to


Mar 05
// Andrew Kauz
Award shows are obnoxious. We all know that. Awards themselves, though, can be their very own source of annoyance. Sure, you can be that annoying guy who goes, "OMG I don't agree with some of the winners so the awards are cra...
 photo

This is the Place: High School


Feb 28
// Nick Valdez
[Woo Nick Valdez! Nick writes a blog about high school and Jon Stewart's tongue. Don't forget that you can see your blogs on the front page if you participate in our monthly theme and write something stellar. - Kauza] Some fi...
 photo

Bloggers Wanted: This is the place


Feb 27
// Andrew Kauz
I groan a little bit whenever I hear someone say that a set or location in a film is just like another character. That said, sometimes it's true. Sometimes, the setting or the world of a movie is the best part - or the only g...
 photo

Bloggers Wanted: A musing dream


Jan 30
// Andrew Kauz
We already know a great deal about what we'll see in 2012. Sure, there are certain to be many surprises before the year is out, but we've all begun making our lists of our most anticipated films of the year. So for this month...
 photo

The Woman was my favorite horror movie of last year, and it's one that you all probably didn't see, since it had a fairly limited theatrical run. However, Flixist is giving you the chance to remedy this horrible problem. We'v...


  Around the web (login to improve these)




Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter!
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -