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#RobLiefeldMovieUniverse photo
#RobLiefeldMovieUniverse

Rob Liefield's Extreme Universe comics may hit big screen on strength of Deadpool


TO THE EXTREME!
Jan 04
// Hubert Vigilla
If you bring up Rob Liefeld among comic book fans, you'll get a whole slew of reactions. Some loathe the man and his artwork (which is very 1990s) while others like The Rob and what he does. One thing he did many years ago wa...
Rogue One: What Changed? photo
Rogue One: What Changed?

Director Gareth Edwards and Rogue One editors talk about changes, reshoots, and restructuring


Opening crawls and alternate scenes
Jan 04
// Hubert Vigilla
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story underwent a number of changes from script to screen. There were extensive reshoots, the film was restructured, and certain shots and lines from early trailers never made it into the theatrical rel...
Han Solo's mentor photo
Han Solo's mentor

Woody Harrelson may play Han Solo's mentor in Star Wars spinoff film


Kingpin is kind of underrated, guys
Jan 04
// Hubert Vigilla
As a first foray into Star Wars spinoffs, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story has been extremely successful both critically and commercially. The upcoming young Han Solo film ought to do gangbusters as well. So far Alden Ehrenreich ...
Tom Hardy reads a story photo
Tom Hardy reads a story

Watch Tom Hardy and his dog Woody read an adorable bedtime story


The moon rises!
Jan 03
// Hubert Vigilla
Tom Hardy tends to be the best thing or secret-best thing in any movie he appears in. He's an exceptional actor who disappears into roles, often stealing the show through voice and mannerism. (For examples, see Bronson, ...
Suicide Squad sucks photo
Suicide Squad sucks

Video essay: Suicide Squad is a master class in awful film editing


It's bad film editing--TO THE EXTREME!
Jan 03
// Hubert Vigilla
Suicide Squad was a hot mess for so many reasons. The primary problem was the film's slapdash construction. From its painfully on-the-nose soundtrack to its multiple and redundant character intros, Suicide Squad went fro...
Strange, Thor, Hulk photo
Strange, Thor, Hulk

Doctor Strange officially joins Thor and Hulk for Thor: Ragnarok


Post-credit sequence now confirmed
Jan 03
// Hubert Vigilla
We're learning more about Thor: Ragnarok in trickles and dribbles and other words that may be associated with bladder control issues later in life. Directed by Taika Waititi (What We Do in the Shadows, Hunt for the Wilderpeop...
Deadpool most pirated photo
Deadpool most pirated

Deadpool was the most pirated movie of 2016


Yarrr
Jan 03
// Hubert Vigilla
Deadpool earned more than $783 million worldwide and two Golden Globe nominations. It can now add another impressive feat to its resume. According to TorrentFreak, Deadpool was also the most pirated movie of 2016. Do movies h...
Leon: The Professional photo
Leon: The Professional

Video essay: Why Luc Besson's Leon: The Professional is an action cinema masterpiece


Hint: It's about character
Jan 02
// Hubert Vigilla
Leon: The Professional was the breakout film for Natalie Portman and Jean Reno's defining role. It's also one of the best action films of the 1990s, and remains my favorite Luc Besson movie to this day. There are many reasons...
Logan postcard photo
Logan postcard

Limited edition Logan postcards will feature a frame from the final trailer


I hurt myself sending postcards today
Jan 02
// Hubert Vigilla
Twentieth Century Fox is doing a bit of pseudo-retro viral marketing for Logan. The final trailer for Hugh Jackman's last ride as Wolverine is coming out this month, and the studio has launched a website called 1974framesoflo...
Castlevania show photo
Castlevania show

Adventure Time producer hints at possible Castlevania TV series


Stupid Medusa heads
Dec 30
// Hubert Vigilla
More than a year ago we mentioned that a super violent Castelvania miniseries was in the works. Producer Adi Shankar made the announcement via Facebook and mentioned Fred Seibert (founder of Frederator Studios and Advent...
Anticipated 2017 films photo
Anticipated 2017 films

Star Wars: Episode VIII is Fandango's most anticipated movie of 2017


Sequels, splosions, and dollar signs
Dec 30
// Hubert Vigilla
Fandango held a poll asking what are people's most anticipated movies of 2017. No surprises, Star Wars: Episode VIII topped the list. Rian Johnson is riding the wave of hype from The Force Awakens and Rogue One, and there wil...
Chazelle & Gosling photo
Chazelle & Gosling

Damien Chazelle & Ryan Gosling working on Neil Armstrong biopic First Man


Moon Moon Land
Dec 30
// Hubert Vigilla
La La Land is bound to be a major player during the awards season, but director Damien Chazelle and the film's co-star Ryan Gosling are already eyeing their next project together. The duo will work on First Man in 2017, a bio...

RIP Debbie Reynolds (1932-2016)

Dec 30 // Hubert Vigilla
RIP Debbie Reynolds photo
She was 84 years old
Actress and singer Debbie Reynolds died on Wednesday at the age of 84. This was soon after the death of her 60-year-old daughter Carrie Fisher. Reynolds reportedly suffered from a stroke the day after her daughter's death, wh...

 photo

New IT reboot Pennywise sewer artwork is full of $#!+


Dec 28
// Rick Lash
Because Christmas is over, Entertainment Weekly debuted some exclusive new artwork from next year's IT reboot/remake, and boy is it special. The highly anticipated reboot will be the first original take on Stephen King's...
Batman v Superman VFX photo
Batman v Superman VFX

Watch a CGI-heavy special effects reel of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice


Everything is computer generated
Dec 28
// Hubert Vigilla
While I wasn't a fan of Zack Snyder's cacophonous Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, I do admire the VFX work put into the film. The craft of the visual effects artists is evident throughout, and this reel from Scanline VFX shows just how much CGI went into making the movie. Check out the reel below.
8-Bit Cinema: Home Alone photo
8-Bit Cinema: Home Alone

8-Bit Cinema recreates Home Alone by way of The Legend of Zelda


Yuletide Murder House Jubilee: The Game
Dec 27
// Hubert Vigilla
Earlier today, Uncle Flixist gave you a video about those deadly Home Alone booby traps. Here's some more belated, leftover Christmas mayhem from your Uncle Flixist courtesy of 8-Bit Cinema. Yes, it's also Home Alone related....
Birdshot trailer photo
Birdshot trailer

Watch the trailer for Mikhail Red's Filipino thriller Birdshot


An award-winning Filipino festival film
Dec 27
// Hubert Vigilla
The second film from Filipino director Mikhail Red, Birdshot looks like a solid, stylish thriller. The film played at the Tokyo International Film Festival back in late October/early November, where it won the Asian Future Be...
Fisher, Hamill, Ford '77 photo
Fisher, Hamill, Ford '77

See vintage interviews with Carrie Fisher, Mark Hamill, and Harrison Ford for Star Wars in 1977


Looking back with fondness
Dec 27
// Hubert Vigilla
Carrie Fisher's death has made me contemplative and somber. Yesterday I hoped she'd have pulled through, and would eventually talk about her experience with her all Force, zero f**ks attitude. The world will miss her so much....
Carrie Fisher GMA 2015 photo
Carrie Fisher GMA 2015

Rewatch Carrie Fisher (and Gary) interviewed on Good Morning America from 2015


All Force, zero f**ks
Dec 27
// Hubert Vigilla
One of the many things that came to mind after hearing that Carrie Fisher passed away was her interview on Good Morning America last year to promote The Force Awakens. Typically this leads to softball press and canned respons...

RIP Carrie Fisher (1956-2016)

Dec 27 // Hubert Vigilla
RIP Carrie Fisher photo
She was 60 years old
Carrie Fisher has passed away after suffering from a heart attack last week. She was 60 years old. Her daughter, actress Billie Lourd, confirmed the sad news in a statement to People Magazine. "It is with a very deep sadness ...

Home Alone booby traps photo
Home Alone booby traps

Watch Home Alone booby traps cause horrible trauma--happy holidays


A yuletide murder house jubilee
Dec 27
// Hubert Vigilla
[We missed this video for Christmas, but let's just pretend this is a delayed gift from Uncle Flixist.] Hey, squirt. How's it going? Sorry to miss you over the weekend, and all, but you know how it is--cold, snowy, planes are...
Logan trailer in LEGO photo
Logan trailer in LEGO

Watch the trailer for Logan recreated with LEGO


Johnny Cash's "Hurt" cover with LEGOs
Dec 27
// Hubert Vigilla
The trailer for Logan really impressed me. If Hugh Jackman's last ride as Wolverine is a post-apocalyptic road movie western, I am all for that. Better it's something distinctly non-X-Men-looking rather than some dumb, rote X...
Dune reboot photo
Dune reboot

Denis Villeneuve in talks to direct Legendary's Dune reboot


Spice up your life
Dec 26
// Hubert Vigilla
Director Denis Villeneuve is currently in talks to direct a reboot of Dune for Legendary. If he gets on board, this would be the latest in Villeneuve's sci-fi oeuvre, following this year's Arrival and next year's Blade Runner...
Star Wars 4K restoration photo
Star Wars 4K restoration

Gareth Edwards says there's a 4K restoration of the original Star Wars


When are we seeing it?
Dec 26
// Hubert Vigilla
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story topped the box office for the second week in a row, and it will likely have good legs for a third week. While doing press for the film, director Gareth Edwards revealed that there's a 4K restorati...

Review: Paterson

Dec 26 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220910:43125:0[/embed] PatersonDirector: Jim JarmuschRelease Date: December 21, 2016 (France); December 28, 2016 (USA, limited)Rating: R 2003's American Splendor may be the best companion to Paterson. That film chronicled the life of comics writer Harvey Pekar. Pekar lived and wrote in Cleveland, and kept a day job at a VA hospital. Paterson in Jarmusch's film works as a bus driver in Paterson, New Jersey. He uses little catches of time through the day to write poetry in his notebook. This is the writing life of working people--no parties with literati, no salons, no scenester-ism, no pretension, just toil and care with words. Paterson follows a week in the life our bus driver. At the end of the first day, we get the broadstrokes of this character's routine. He wakes up beside his girlfriend Laura (Golshifteh Farahani), he walks to work, he eavesdrops on people's conversations, he returns home, he walks their bulldog, and he has a drink at the local bar. The routine might seem stifling, but Jarmusch enlarges the world that Paterson lives in. Side characters get fleshed out in unexpected ways, and we get new details about who Paterson and Laura are through careful reveals and well-observed scenes. The initial claustrophobia of the structure both folds out and opens inward. Paterson's acts of noticing help convey his sense of the city he lives in, his interior life, and the lives of people around him. Bad poetry ruins everything. To avoid that danger, Jarmusch hired New York School poet Ron Padgett to write original work for Paterson. Paterson's poetry reads like actual poetry (a pastiche of William Carlos Williams) rather than the hokey stuff that movie-poetry often sounds like. Jarmusch depicts the writing of this poetry through voiceover and superimposed text over montages. It isn't the most ideal representation of the creative process, but it works. The whole of Paterson is imbued with its own poetic flourishes, like the constant appearance of twins, doubles, or mirrored lines, as if trying to find a visual equivalent for internal rhyme or rhyming couplets. (Intentional correspondence: William Carlos Williams, writer of the five-book poem Paterson, is the favorite poet of a man named Paterson who lives in Paterson, NJ in a movie called Paterson. Coincidental correspondence: Adam Driver cast as a bus driver. ) One of the more fascinating things I noticed about Paterson was how it explores the relationship between Paterson and Laura. They spend most of their time apart, but thanks to the new information we get about each of them as the film unfolds, I'm able to understand not just how they work as a couple but why. On the surface, Laura seems like a manic pixie dream girl artist who wound up with a polite stoic, but they complement each other and know the importance of space and time in their relationship. Driver is a delicate soul in this film rather than his usual hipster scumbag. His performance reminds me of an artist friend back in the Bay Area who struggles to make time to paint. Farahani adds depth to Laura, who, like her boyfriend, is a type of optimistic American dreamer. Maybe this space and togetherness between Paterson and Laura is an example of the power of interpersonal enjambment. There's been a lot of discussion in the online literary community about the role of writing in the lives of writers. Is writing just a hobby? Can writing really be considered a job? As if those are the only options. Paterson seems to offer its own answers with a zen-like Jarmusch cool. While Paterson keeps so many of his poems to himself in a journal, he writes because he can't live without it. It's where he finds and creates meaning, and issues of ego, publication, notoriety, and the local scene never factor into the significance of what he does. It is significant simply because it is. Perhaps the melancholy of the score is meant as a counterpoint to Paterson the man. So much about the surface of his life suggests the misery of obscure solitude. That might be true in other stories, but Paterson is a writer, and in addition to his good fortune for having the friends he does, he has writing to fill the empty spaces of each day.
Review: Paterson photo
The city, the man, the joyous everday
Jim Jarmusch's Paterson is work of subtle optimism. It's a gentle film, kind and generous, funny, too. Watching the movie, I sensed Jarmusch giving me a reassuring push, like a parent at a swing or a child casting off a toy b...

Assassin's Creed trilogy? photo
Assassin's Creed trilogy?

Michael Fassbender says there's an entire Assassin's Creed film trilogy mapped out


Whether or not we'll see it, though...
Dec 26
// Hubert Vigilla
The reviews for Assassin's Creed have been about as lackluster as the box office. Since opening on December 21st, the film has only earned about $11.2 million. It came in fifth place for the Christmas weekend, beaten by Why H...

Review: The Autopsy of Jane Doe

Dec 25 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221155:43293:0[/embed] The Autopsy of Jane DoeDirector: André ØvredalRelease Date: December 21, 2016 (limited theaters and VOD) Rating: R The Autopsy of Jane Doe follows father and son pathologists, Tommy (Brian Cox) and Austin (Emile Hirsch) Tilden operating out of their family owned morgue. When the body of an unidentified young woman (Olwen Kelly) is found, the two must figure out the mysterious circumstances behind her death. But as the autopsy rolls on, strange things begin happening and the Tildens find themselves struggling to escape the mortuary with their lives. This simple premise is what makes Autopsy work as well as it does. It's a tightly focused feature never losing sight of its central mystery. I'm going to try my best not to divulge the film's mystery, but honestly, the film isn't even about the reveal. It's all in the build-up. The entire film is built around this idea of confinement, and that's reflected in the film's editing and set design.  From the opening, there's a keen sense of dread permeating throughout the film. The inspired choices like an aged mortuary building (enhanced by a lack of natural light thanks to Autopsy taking place late at night), to the casting of Jane Doe herself, help make the audience uncomfortable. Taking something as inherently disturbing as a medical procedure is made doubly so thanks to quick cuts to Jane's face every time one of the Tilden's makes an incision. Thanks to these close ups, the autopsy becomes more like a creepy surgery that permeates with dramatic irony as the audience becomes more suspicious of Jane than the characters. There's also a refreshing flow to how much of Jane's mystery is revealed at a time. By halfway through, you already know most of what is necessary to move the plot forward without going overboard. Unfortunately, since the film's effort is put into Jane Doe, the Tildens get less development as a result.  There are some hints of tension between Austin and his father, but that's more credited to Hirsch's and Cox's performances than to any character building. Due to the film's tight focus and short time, there isn't much room in the narrative for anything other than the mystery. Even as the Tildens fear for their lives, I found myself lacking the necessary wherewithal to care whether or not they actually survived. Because of this, the film lacks tension once Jane Doe's origins are revealed. Since so much effort is put into its buildup, there sadly isn't enough effort left over for the denouement. In fact, the finale even goes on for a bit longer than it should. There's a particular scene toward the end that would've made for a perfect finale, but seeing Autopsy go beyond it lessened my enjoyment overall. I guess it's more of a sense of disappointment given how well Autopsy had edited itself to that point. But on the other hand, I do appreciate the uniqueness of The Autopsy of Jane Doe. While there are some ideas I would've liked to see the film explore further (especially when it teases metaphysical horror, which is something lacking from most current offerings in the genre), and I would've appreciated a better grasp on character, the film sets out to tell a certain story and competently does it.  The Autopsy of Jane Doe is a focused, chilling thriller that you should check out before you start writing your end of the year lists. 
Jane Doe Review photo
Doe-n't miss this one
Every year I wind up missing a good deal of films as their advertising end up swallowed by the huge hype machines of bigger studio releases. But the true gems make themselves known somehow. Usually it's through word of mouth,...

Review: Why Him?

Dec 25 // Rick Lash
[embed]221153:43291:0[/embed] Why Him?Director: John HamburgRelease Date: December 23, 2016Rating: R Why Him? is the story of a wholesome Midwest family from Michigan comprised of a well-regarded father Ned Fleming (Brian Cranston) who runs a printing business, his loving wife Barb Fleming (Megan Mullally), and their clean-cut son Scotty Fleming (Griffin Gluck) who clearly idolizes his father. It turns out there’s also a sister, Stephanie Fleming (Zoey Deutch), but she’s in college in California, and apparently the family hasn’t used phones, the internet, Snapchat, Skype, Facetime, Messenger, or beam-me-over technology to keep in touch during the span she’s been away. It’s true that the Rocky Mountains are still a cool, inhospitable, Donner-party producing, block to human travel and communication. It turns out that things aren’t so hot for this all-American family: the family printing business is in the red, and Dad doesn’t know what to do facing the challenges of a changing world and evolving print needs for his traditional client-base. Enter an, apparently, rare video phone call from said cutoff daughter and the testy revelation that she has a boyfriend (James Franco). Oh, and by the way Mom, Pops, and Junior: could you all forego any existing Christmas plans and fly to California to meet my boyfriend? Obviously, they can, or else we wouldn’t have much of a movie. California. A foreign land to a family from Michigan. Filled with strange peoples with stranger cultural habits. Or that seems to be the message of the film. Writer-Director John Hamburg, perhaps best known for I Love You Man (a solid comedy pairing with Jason Segal and Paul Rudd from 2009) teamed with Johan Hill to pen this one: and it shows. The movie is filled with a veritable thesaurus for the f-bomb, as well as references to obscure (and not so obscure) sexual practices--hallmarks of the Shat Pack (Hill, Seth Rogen, Franco, Michael Cera, Segal, Jay Baruchel, and the rest of the amorphous gang that comprises this group of miscreants that would make Cranston’s Ned Fleming cringe, especially if any of them were to date his daughter. It doesn’t matter if they’re rich, incredibly rich, live in a mansion nestled into private acreage, or run their own business: if they have tattoos and swear (“cuss”) frequently, they’re not good enough for you or your daughter. And thus begins the purported conflict of the movie. It doesn’t matter that Deucht’s Stephanie is bright, levelheaded, and apparently not prone to poor judgement; daddy knows best—and every fiber of his mid-west being is saying no to this California tech hippy. But to me, the premise seems as outdated as the beliefs espoused by Ned. Lots of people have tattoos these days, dare I say even in Michigan, and swearing is is the new Oxford English. The fact that this father is so opposed to this man he’s just met, primarily to either evidence A (poor judgement in the face of genuine excitement—if you’ve seen the trailers, you know Franco has a tattoo of the Fleming Christmas card done on his back) or evidence B (he’s sleeping with his daughter and therefore cannot be any good) does not ring true. That’s the true problem with the film: it’s hollow, as its premises are loosely constructed anachronisms that might have been more applicable a decade ago. Who in the printing business, in this day and age, could be caught unaware of the shifting landscape and needs of their clientele? The Office was dealing with this same fact for much of the prescribed decade earlier. Given these issues of authenticity and realism, there are laughs to be found. But these are the forced, awkward laughs that come from watching a son suddenly subjected to viewing an explicit love scene with his mother. It’s the forced awkward laughter that’s more cringe inducement by baby head cresting a vagina vis-à-vis Knocked Up. This awkward humor is reinforced by a score that is largely absent; large swaths of film are destroyed in conversational silence. When music does happen, it is conspicuous and perhaps feels forced (the one notable exception being a party designed to further emphasize the generational gap at work here. Humor that does work is found in unexpected twists like cameos and extended cameos from Adam Devine and Keegan-Michael Key. Or in the Siri-wannabe Kaley Cuoco voice that lives in the airspace of Franco’s mansion. This could have been done to better success, and I’d expect word of mouth box office results to confirm as much, especially given the level of talent featured in the film.
Why Him? Review photo
Why me?
Sometimes questions shouldn't be begged in the titles of pieces lacking the substance to back up or even fully answer the suggested question. Why Him? Falls victim to this trope. Why him? Why me? Why see this movie?  

Alien: Covenant photo
Uh...Merry Christmas?
If you can spare a few minutes away from your family today, you should check out the first Red Band trailer for Alien: Covenant. Ridley Scott's Prometheus wasn't received too well, so it looks like Scott wants to rectify that...

Moooortal Kombaaaaaat! photo
Moooortal Kombaaaaaat!

Honest Trailers does a fatality on the Mortal Kombat movies


Toasty!
Dec 23
// Hubert Vigilla
Honest Trailers has been doing some gangbusters videos lately, going hard on Suicide Squad and showing the love for The Empire Strikes Back. They're back to being mocking with Mortal Kombat, just in time for Christmas. Mortal...

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