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Carrie Fisher Star Wars 9 photo
Carrie Fisher Star Wars 9

Carrie Fisher will appear in Star Wars Episode IX without using CG doubles


Additional footage is the key
Apr 10
// Hubert Vigilla
After the death of Carrie Fisher late last year, people wondered whether or not she would appear in Star Wars Episode IX. Given how certain actors were recreated with CG in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, there was some specula...
Thor: Ragnarok trailer photo
Ahhhhh-ohhhh-aaaaaaaah-AAAAH!
If you asked me two years ago if I'd be excited about a new Thor movie, the answer would be, "No, not at all." Enter Thor: Ragnarok from Taika Waititi (What We Do in the Shadows, Hunt for the Wilderpeople). It's... it... Guys...

Review: The Void

Apr 10 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]221365:43495:0[/embed] The VoidDirectors: Steven Kostanski and Jeremy GillespieRating: NRRelease Date: March 31, 2017 (UK); April 7, 2017 (US)  Daniel (Aaron Poole), a small town cop, finds a distraught man on an empty road in the middle of the night. This guy's just fled from a mysterious home invasion and murder, but Daniel doesn't know that. Daniel brings the man to the local hospital for treatment. A group of cultists surround the hospital, and strange, cosmic horror-y things begin to happen. The characters are quickly hewn from familiar tropes: the protagonist's estranged wife (Kathleen Munroe), a pregnant woman about to deliver (Grace Munro), a caring town doctor everyone respects (Kenneth Welsh), and two killers with uncertain motives who may or may not be good guys (Daniel Fathers and Mik Byskov). This group has to fend off the evil outside while strange powers turn people into tentacled, tumored, cyst-covered creatures that are a little bit H.P. Lovecraft and a lot of Rob Bottin. It's a modest set up, but there's a lot to do within that framework. Writers/co-directors Steven Kostanski and Jeremy Gillespie know their way around genre conventions and the camera. As the film goes wild with creatures and slime, they do an admirable job of making their film feel like an artifact of the VHS era. Even though the characters are usually one-note, there's a genuine sense of tension as they fight for their lives. In the first creature scene I think the effects are shown too obliquely and there's too much flickering light, but Kostanski and Gillespie typically show their horrors in all of their wonderful, lymphy madness. Yet as The Void unfolded, I felt like I was mostly noticing nods to other films rather than getting lost in The Void. When The Void revealed a plot twist, I thought about another movie; when a creature appeared on screen, I thought about another movie; even when The Void ended, I thought about another movie (two, actually). What I'm getting at: The Void is a great stroll through a videostore, but it doesn't go that additional step beyond its influences to become its own thing. I think about cover bands that don't quite twist the original enough, or maybe a tribute band--songs in the style of a downbeat Lucio Fulci zombie movie as done by John Carpenter. It's not like Kostanski and Gillespie lacked their own material. The mythology of their cosmic horror is promising. Sadly, it's left vague--a pretext for plot rather than something fully realized--and they never allow their own mythology's eldritch contours to wrest control from their genre forebears. There was so much unexplored territory they could have covered, but they stuck to the well-worn paths that others had made before them. I couldn't help but feel disappointed even though I liked what I saw. Experiences like this that make me appreciate the originality of those seminal 80s horror and sci-fi films. It's easy and enjoyable to recreate moods and pay homage to scenes, but much harder to go that extra step and create something genre-defining. That said, I want to see what Kostanski and Gillespie do next. There's promise in The Void, and maybe if I were younger or hadn't grown up watching the same movies the filmmakers did, I would find the movie more satisfying. I just hope in their next movie Kostanski and Gillespie get away from the videostore and put more of themselves and their original ideas front and center.
Review: The Void photo
Fulci + Carpenter + Lovecraft
The 80s aesthetic is chic these days in genre films. Just take a look at Beyond the Black Rainbow, It Follows, or The Guest, among others. Homage and pastiche don't guarantee quality, of course, but it's an indicator tha...

Joe Manganiello DnD photo
Joe Manganiello DnD

Joe Manganiello wants to make a Dungeons and Dragons movie, has co-written script


Roll for initiative
Apr 10
// Hubert Vigilla
Dungeons & Dragons has plenty of high-profile devotees, from Stephen Colbert to Vin Diesel to Junot Diaz. You can add Joe Manganiello to the list. He's been open about his geekdom before, and recently played D&D at Ne...
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Wesley Snipes, KISS, the WWE, and the Power Rangers make a movie


We're not clever enough to make this up
Apr 07
// Rick Lash
It begins like a joke you'd hear from a true social recluse: what do Wesley Snipes, Gene Simmons, World Wrestling Entertainment and Saban Films (a subsidiary of Saban Entertainment, owners of the Power Rangers) have in common...
Call of Duty movies photo
Call of Duty movies

Call of Duty cinematic universe in the works because companies want your money


Money money money money money money
Apr 06
// Hubert Vigilla
Everyone wants a cinematic universe these days. Marvel/Disney have the big one. DC/Warner Bros. have a troubled one. Hell, Universal Studios is trying to launch one with classic movie monsters (see the Mummy reboot with Tom C...
It/Cat In the Hat trailer photo
It/Cat In the Hat trailer

Watch an It trailer parody featuring Mike Myers' Cat in the Hat as Pennywise


OH YEAAAAAAH!
Apr 06
// Hubert Vigilla
Even though we were skeptical and mockingly dismissive about the look of the new Pennywise, we can't deny that the trailer for the 2017 It adaptation is frightening and well done. It's racked up 22.9 million views on YouTube ...
Invader Zim teaser photo
Invader Zim teaser

Listen to Invader Zim and GIR's teaser for their TV movie return


Doom doom doom doom-doom-doom doom...
Apr 06
// Hubert Vigilla
The other day we told you insolent meatbags that an Invader Zim TV movie is in the works. Creator Jhonen Vasquez will make the film for Nickelodeon, collecting all of your nostalgia ducats in the process. The original voice c...

Review: Colossal

Apr 05 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]221367:43490:0[/embed] ColossalDirector: Nacho VigalondoRating: RRelease Date: April 7, 2017 (limited) Gloria (Anne Hathaway) skulks into her boyfriend's apartment and gets kicked out. She's an alcoholic and self-absorbed, and like any real life fuck-up, Gloria excels at fucking up her attempts at getting un-fucked-up. She moves into her empty childhood home. She sleeps on the floor in an uninflated air mattress; she rolls into it like the filling in a burrito. A childhood friend named Oscar (Jason Sudeikis) helps get her back on her feet with a job at his bar and a little bit of furniture. And for some reason, whenever Gloria does a certain thing in the morning, a giant monster shows up in Seoul, South Korea. And for some reason, Gloria is able to control it. I love absurd conceits like this. The weirdness is the whole allure of the world created, and it serves as a foundation for some larger metaphor. Once the goofiness of the set-up clears (it doesn't entirely), Vigalondo and his cast take it deadly serious, as if all this strangeness has life-or-death consequences. That's weirdness wielded right rather than weirdness for its own sake. All of this is in service to a pomo allegory about (initially) fucking up. Using the kaiju as a guide, I could see Gloria drunkenly careening through her entire life without any regard for the lives she's affected. When you're drunk or depressed or your life is in such haze that you've become oblivious to the world around you, it can be difficult to see that you're hurting others. In Gloria's case, pissing off bosses or boyfriends is nothing, but now she sees news footage of how bad choices lead to the suffering of dozens, even hundreds, of total strangers. The guilt is immense because the scale of moral consequence is magnified to an absurd level. It's an inversion, and I think an intentional one, of the idea that one death is a tragedy while a million deaths are a statistic. For Gloria, those interpersonal, everyday interactions aren't enough to cause a major existential reassessment, but at this scale with so many people at stake, suddenly the implication of a city in peril calls attention to a one-on-one ethical interaction. To put it another way, the cries of a hundred strangers somehow magnify the faces of the people in front of her. Ditto her own face in the mirror. Hathaway has a great way of conveying the moral shock of it all in her eyes and on her face. Sometimes she winces with a "Did I do that?" expression, like spilling a drink. Other times she's doubled over with guilt, bawling, as if watching people in front of her suffer; worse, she feels too helpless to do anything about it. And yet there's more to Colossal than this single metaphor played out to its logical conclusion. The conclusion is not so clear cut. There are different kinds of monsters in Colossal. Without giving anything away, the film focuses just as much on the people we know as it does on the inner demons we're not quite acquainted with. The monster in Seoul gives the audience a projection of Gloria's interior life. As I watched Gloria with her ex-boyfriend and certain people in her hometown, I got a clear, sad, familiar portrait of her interpersonal life filled with "nice guys", toxic masculinity, and different forms of abuse. Most men treat her like a child, like a sexual conquest, like an irredeemable fuck up, like someone beneath and always dependent on them. Maybe Gloria's monster, destroyer of cities, is not just a kaiju made of her many fuck-ups. Maybe it's also a response to the men who put her down, demean her, and try to keep her compliant, weak, insecure, and small. It's self-destruction writ large on the one hand, but maybe it's also a strong and ennobling part of Gloria. Good symbols have different--sometimes even contradictory--facets to them, just like complicated people and lovable stories. From one angle, a dazzling light, from others a murky view of the world, but it's all of a piece. I keep turning Colossal around in my mind, admiring its angles and performances, how it fits together in an asymmetrical way. Mostly, though, I love how seriously it takes Gloria in the face of such gargantuan weirdness.
Review: Colossal photo
The genre mash, it was a kaiju smash
One of my least favorite movie cliches goes something like this: A person who lives in the city has an existential crisis. They reluctantly return to their hometown, where things are much simpler and quieter. The main charact...

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Shia LaBeouf's latest film, Man Down, sells one ticket in UK premiere


Blame it on Brexit?
Apr 05
// Rick Lash
You remember Shia LaBeouf, the boy who cried giant, alien, metal, transforming robots from space, back in ... oh the Mesozoic era (2007), right? Well, that fast-talking pre-hipster who made out with Megan Fox at the height of...
Invader Zim TV movie photo
Invader Zim TV movie

Invader Zim will return in TV movie form, meatbags!


I LOVEDED YOU, PIGGY!
Apr 04
// Hubert Vigilla
Jhonen Vasquez was an important cultish part of my teenage years, and I can still find his creative fingerprints in my sense of humor. I loved his comics Johnny the Homicidal Maniac and Squee (these days especially the l...
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Comedy Central's unleashing The President Show, starring: Donald Trump


This is NOT fake news
Apr 04
// Rick Lash
No matter where you find yourself on the political spectrum, there's likely a place for you to find agreement with the following statement: politics and the mainstream news are a circus and someone needs to help me laugh abou...

Review: Your Name

Apr 04 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]221337:43448:0[/embed] Your Name (Kimi no Na wa, 君の名は。)Director: Makoto ShinkaiRating: PGRelease Date: August 26, 2016 (Japan); April 7, 2017 (USA)Country: Japan Our two body-swapped and star-crossed heroes are a country girl named Mitsuha and a city boy named Taki. Apropos of nothing, the two teens swap bodies. At first they think they're dreaming--as Mitsuha in Taki's body struggles as a waiter in a restaurant, she wonders when her long and bizarre dream will end. Taki in Mitsuha's body begins each morning copping a feel like a creeper. They intermittently lead each other's lives, and they come to enjoy the ability to live a life so different from their own day-to-day. The allure, like most body swap films, is in the contrast of experiences--metropolitan and pastoral, modern and traditional, the social norms of male and female, etc. My enjoyment of Your Name can be broken into quarters. I loved the first quarter of the movie, which was a great modern take on the body swap genre. The city boy and the country girl get to know each other obliquely, corresponding through their own cellphones with do's and don'ts about each other's lives. Shinkai closes that opening quarter with a fantastic montage of the joys and frustrations of living another life only to return to the mucked-up nature of your own. I liked the second quarter of Your Name, which, without spoilers, involves a mystery and a journey. Tonally it reminded me a little of Hirokazu Koreeda's charming I Wish, though an adolescent version. As for the last half of Your Name? It was all right. "Generally acceptable" may be a more accurate phrase. So much about Your Name hinges on a major plot twist and the way the narrative treats this revealed information. If I wasn't on board with the first portion of the film, the swerve at the halfway mark would have soured me on the whole movie. It's all dependent on a series of narrative conveniences that the story doesn't attempt to explain: spotty memory, technological failure, the loose rules of the body swapping, a lack of common sense from the characters, lapses in human curiosity. And yet, somehow, I think Your Name still works by the end because it is so earnest about its teenage feelings. There's the desire to be understood by someone, to forge a lasting connection, to make sense of your own life. That's all there. I watched the movie in a crowded theater full of teens and young adults. As a plot twist occurred in the second half, gasps rustled through the crowd. After that emotional gut reaction, the analytical bits in my brain stepped forward and processed the information. No, a little too convenient, but just go with it. This kept happening in the last half of the movie. I found myself liking moments even though I was of two minds about them. There's a gorgeous scene set at dusk before a dimming sky. It's quiet, it's memorable, it was enough for me to disregard a lapse in logic a few scenes before. A young woman in the crowd, excited by the connection that occurred on screen, whispered an elated "Yes". Minutes later, sighs from the crowd, crestfallen, like everyone had breathed out at once. I couldn't help but be moved as well--I felt what someone else was feeling, which is what Your Name is about at its best. Oddly, some of my qualms come from understanding Shinkai's point of view as a storyteller. To affect the audience the way he wants to, Shinkai needs to move the story in direction P, therefore actions L, M, N, and O have to occur. I saw the movie with Steve over at Unseen Films, and his immediate feelings for the movie were far more tepid than mine. The logical lapses were so apparent to him. My own fondness for the first half of the film led me to justify those logical lapses to him even though I noticed them as well. And I have to admit, my justification was because I understood Shinkai's storytelling motivations rather than any diegetic explanation provided by the film. I can't recall who said this or if I'm even getting it right, but there's a sandwich rule when it comes to storytelling. Say you make a movie. Part of it doesn't make sense. If an audience member doesn't realize there's a lapse in logic until hours later when they're making a sandwich, the story is successful. Your Name didn't pass the sandwich test with me, but I could sense it did with many others in the crowd. Even without the sandwich test, there was a lot to admire. If only the last half had hooked me more, not by plot twists but through the characters, not by letters signifying Shinkai's moves but rather that ineffable emotional stuff that's harder to figure out and impossible to name.
Review: Your Name photo
The body swap movie with a swerve
Makoto Shinkai's Your Name is the highest-grossing anime film of all-time, and it hasn't even come out in the United States yet. It beat Hayao Miyazaki's Spirited Away; give it a few more months and Your Name may beat Spirite...

New Wonder Woman images photo
New Wonder Woman images

New images from Wonder Woman leave me feeling cautiously optimistic


Don't screw this up for once, WB
Apr 04
// Hubert Vigilla
So far, the DCEU has been a nihilistic bro-fest of brawn, brooding, and ♫BWAAAAM♫. Patty Jenkins' Wonder Woman might be the combo breaker. The San Diego Comic Con footage and the first and second trailers have som...
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Recap: The Walking Dead Season 7 Finale


Apr 02
// Rick Lash
Season seven of AMC’s The Walking Dead began with the bat and it looked like things might end that way too.  We began, back in October, with the group at their all-time low point: they had been outmaneuvered at eve...

Review: Ghost in the Shell

Apr 01 // Rick Lash
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Ghost in the Shell has been on my list of to-sees for some time. While I was never a reader of the original Japanese manga which premiered in 1989, I am a fan of the televised anime from 2002. Indeed, Ghost in the Shell: Stan...

Review: David Lynch: The Art Life

Mar 31 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]221368:43488:0[/embed] David Lynch: The Art LifeDirectors: Jon Nguyen and Rick BarnesRating: NRRelease Date: March 31, 2017  The Art Life is like passing a flashlight along a bumpy surface to watch the way the shadows shift, or standing near a painting at a weird angle to admire the thickness of the paint and note the interruptions in the path of a brushstroke. Lynch mentions that the past can often inform images or ideas, and then gets talking about an early childhood memory. In his childhood suburb standing outside, a naked woman in distress across the street; he didn't know what was wrong but just that something was wrong. Accompanying artwork fills the screen. While Nguyen and Barnes never show the corresponding clip from Blue Velvet, I couldn't help but think of that scene in Blue Velvet. Yet that's the point. This memory has been with Lynch his entire life, and there are plenty of manifestations of it in his art. This made me think about the way Lynch speaks and how that's a study in vocal texture. He uses simple language to convey deep feelings that are maybe too complex to describe. Weird Director affectation, sure maybe, yet there's also the way Lynch says what he says. I can hear the verbal underlining and italicizing, and some of the (intentionally or unintentionally) arch delivery when he means more than he's willing to say. While sharing another childhood memory, Lynch stops abruptly. Something really bad happened, and we know nothing more, so it must have been that bad. The texture of the memory but not the memory directly. As an aggregate of these biographical textures, it's fascinating to consider The Art Life as a lens through which to view Eraserhead. The documentary covers Lynch's childhood to the making of his first feature film. If the past informs images and ideas, this must be a sample of the mental material Lynch brought to Eraserhead; all that unease in Philadelphia and the intense poverty and the unspoken difficulties of Lynch's first marriage. Yet Eraserhead is still an inscrutable masterpiece of personal associations and whatever its viewer brings to it. Beyond texture, I think The Art Life is a great display of Lynch's creative process. There's something wonderful about seeing visual artists at work. How they do what they do is often an expression of who they are. Lynch is especially hands-on, and almost childlike in terms of his approach, but there's also an intuitive intellect at work that knows how to manipulate the material being worked. He uses paint layered thick for textures, sometimes applied to panels with his hands, smeared across. What better way to really control texture? Every now and then, Lynch's 3-year-old daughter Lula appears on screen, painting alongside dad. It's so idyllic in that industrial workspace of Lynch's home. It reminds me of a well-kept metalshop/woodshop class in a good public high school. I'd like to revisit the 1997 documentary Pretty As a Picture: The Art of David Lynch, which seems like a strong companion piece to The Art Life. In that documentary, Lynch mentions how he liked using latex paints and house paints when he does visual art, and how he used to incorporate raw meat into his artwork so ants and flies could pick away at the paintings and allow interesting things to happen to the images. Maybe the past doc will inform the present doc and vice versa, and maybe the old Lynch will illuminate something the younger Lynch said. The art life is a long one. Strange too, and worthwhile.
David Lynch documentary photo
For fans of Lynch's films and artwork
David Lynch: The Art Life hits a sweet spot in terms of its release date. Lynch's feature-length debut Eraserhead has just turned 40 years old, and the new season of Twin Peaks starts in May. There's bound to be a resurg...

PTA + DDL = XMAS photo
PTA + DDL = XMAS

Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis' new movie gets Christmas release date


A fashion drama under the tree
Mar 30
// Hubert Vigilla
While little is known about Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis' newest film, it's still one of the most anticipated movies of 2017. Currently in production under the title Phantom Thread, the movie takes place in Londo...
The Book Of Henry photo
The Book Of Henry

First trailer for Colin Trevorrow's The Book Of Henry has vibe of child-led throwback thriller


Like a move I'd see rerun on cable
Mar 30
// Hubert Vigilla
Colin Trevorrow received a lot of flack for Jurassic World, some of it undeserved. It's mediocre at best and a cynical cash grab even at best, but it's not totally wretched, just plain wretched. Think of the difference betwee...
Planet of the Apes 3 photo
Planet of the Apes 3

New War for the Planet of the Apes trailer sets up primate revenge and man's last stand


Talking apes? That's bananas!
Mar 30
// Hubert Vigilla
Matt Reeves' War for the Planet of the Apes is just two months away. The movie didn't make our most anticipated movies of 2017, which may have been a mistake on our part, or maybe a sign of general iffiness. Rise of...

Joss Whedon will direct a standalone Batgirl movie for the DCEU

Mar 30 // Hubert Vigilla
This also makes me wonder if this will feature a Dick Grayson/Nightwing appearance to set up the Nightwing movie that was announced a month ago. Is this the start of the DCEU Bat Family sub-universe, aka the DCEUBFSU? Whedon makes sense for Batgirl. The creator and driving force behind Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a solid choice to steer a Batgirl story in a reliable direction. I wonder what iteration of Batgirl it will be, though. Will it be the new hipster Batgirl of Burnside (the Brooklyn of Gotham City) who sports the bossest new costume around, or will this be a more classic iteration of Barbara Gordon? We'll report more details as they arise. What do you think of this news? Is the DCEU doing something right? Will this wind up delayed by the summer? Let us know in the comments. [via Variety]
Joss Whedon Batgirl photo
BAH GAWD! THAT'S JOSS WHEDON'S MUSIC!
Variety reports that Joss Whedon will direct a standalone Batgirl movie for Warner Bros. and the DCEU. Whedon will also write the film and serve as producer. Variety notes that comics writer and producer Geoff Johns will be o...

Tribeca Film Festival announces two-day Games Festival with Hideo Kojima as keynote guest

Mar 30 // Hubert Vigilla
INAUGURAL TRIBECA GAMES FESTIVAL DEBUTS APRIL 28-29, 2017FEATURING A CONVERSATION WITH LEGENDARY GAME CREATOR HIDEO KOJIMA Tribeca Games® and Kill Screen Partner for Event Examining the Past, Present and Future of Games to Take Place During the 16th Annual Tribeca Film Festival® at The Tribeca Festival Hub at Spring Studios in New York City Festival to Open with Mura Masa Concert, Feature Keynote Conversations with Max Payne Creator Sam Lake and BioShock Director/Writer Ken Levine Plus Talks On Overwatch, Firewatch, the Watch Dogs Universe and Much More New York, NY [March 29, 2017] – Tribeca Games and Kill Screen have partnered to launch the Tribeca Games Festival, an event that will bring together New York City’s passionate gaming community to examine where games have been and what comes next in the race to innovate in the world’s most popular medium. Sitting at the intersection of games, entertainment and culture, the festival will include behind-the-scenes looks back at some of the most fascinating games of the past year, and conversations with cultural leaders and game industry insiders, including a conversation with legendary game creator, Hideo Kojima. The inaugural Tribeca Games Festival will take place April 28-29 during the Tribeca Film Festival at The Tribeca Festival Hub at Spring Studios. Tickets are on sale now at www.tribecafilm.com/games. The Tribeca Film Festival, presented by AT&T, runs April 19-30. Hideo Kojima is widely celebrated as the godfather of the stealth action game genre, having created the Metal Gear franchise 30 years ago this July. He was awarded the Game Developers Choice Awards’ Lifetime Achievement Award in March 2009, inducted into the Academy of Interactive Arts and Science’s Hall of Fame in February 2016 and, most recently received The Game Awards’ Industry Icon Award this past December. Hideo Kojima leads a robust schedule of conversations to take place at the Festival, including additional keynote conversations given by Quantum Break, Alan Wake and Max Payne creator Sam Lake and BioShock director/writer Ken Levine, a celebration of the 25th anniversary of virtual reality-themed movie The Lawnmower Man with filmmaker Brett Leonard, principal filmmaker for VR at Google Jessica Brillhart and Cy Wise from Job Simulator's Owlchemy Labs, and discussions with developers of recent and upcoming games such as Overwatch, The Banner Saga, Firewatch, The Stanley Parable, Watch Dogs 2, What Remains of Edith Finch and several more. The festival will kick off with the New York premiere of Telltale Games’ first-ever crowd play of Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale series, Episode 1 and a concert headlined by British electronic producer and multi-instrumentalist Mura Masa. Fresh off a Coachella performance, Mura Masa will light up the Tribeca Festival Hub at Spring Studios with the sounds of the future, bringing his Billboard-topping music to an audience of over 500. “Five years ago, Tribeca was the first film festival to welcome gaming to the official program. Since then, we’ve continued to support the storytellers who have propelled it to become the world’s most popular and growing medium,” said Jane Rosenthal, co-founder and Executive Chair of the Tribeca Film Festival. “Through Tribeca Games, with Kill Screen, we will create a can’t-miss event that will bring together the most creative and innovative creators, thought leaders, and insiders from the gaming world and beyond.” The Tribeca Games Festival program includes “X Post Conversations,” a series of cross-cultural conversations, each pairing a creator from the gaming community with someone of equal stature from an outside field; “Retro Active,” a series of talks that take a look back on some of the greatest titles from 2016, exploring every element from art, design and sound to storytelling; “Sneak Peeks,” previews of new and unreleased work from some of the most dynamic independent game studios from around the world, and an interactive arcade allowing attendees to get hands-on with new and unreleased games. Full details about all confirmed sessions and participants can be found now a www.tribecafilm.com/games. Additional speakers and game titles will be announced soon. “The Tribeca Games Festival in partnership with Kill Screen will bring tech thinkers, fans, and interactive makers together with New York’s massive games and interactive community for a marquee program dedicated to the medium of play,” said Jamin Warren, founder of Kill Screen. Tickets for the Tribeca Games Festival are $40 and will go on sale on today, March 29, 2017 at www.tribecafilm.com/games. Tickets for opening night are sold separately for $30. A limited amount of tickets that include an entry window for Tribeca Immersive, the Tribeca Film Festival’s event for virtual reality and interactive installations, will also be available for $70. In 2011, Tribeca was the first film festival to welcome gaming to the official program with the World Premiere of L.A. Noire, a detective-based Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 (PS3) game. It has continued to support artists in the gaming world with the premiere of Beyond: Two Souls, a PS3 fantasy role-playing game led by Oscar® nominee Ellen Page (2013); a panel series on innovation and storytelling in gaming with League of Legends designers, artists, producers, and musicians (2015); a partnership with Games for Change that illustrated how new and innovative platforms can serve the social good with participants including Morgan Spurlock, Pulitzer Prize-winning authors Nicholas Kristof & Sheryl WuDunn (A Path Appears), Chief Scientist of Oculus VR Michael Abrash, and the developers of Rovio’s blockbuster mobile game Angry Birds (2015, 2016); and more.   The Tribeca Games Festival program follows:   OPENING NIGHT A celebration of games, play and interactivity set to the music of British electronic producer and multi-instrumentalist Mura Masa, who inspires game makers and players globally, and an exclusive Telltale crowdplay experience   KEYNOTE CONVERSATIONS Intimate conversations some of the top game creators on the future of games and storytelling.   Hideo Kojima The legendary creator of the Metal Gear franchise, on what’s next for him and the influences of cinema on his work. Ken Levine Director and Writer of the BioShock series, Levine reflects on his two decades in videogames and the legacy his work has created for interactive story-telling. Sam Lake The creator of Max Payne, Alan Wake and Quantum Break, on his unique approach to storytelling in games.   X POST CONVERSATIONS Cross-cultural conversations, pairing a creator of the gaming community with leading artists and filmmakers.   Winslow Porter, Milica Zec and Tracy Fullerton Virtual reality directors Winslow Porter and Milica Zec and Director of USC’s Game Innovation Lab Tracy Fullerton discuss how to create real-world environmental awareness in digital worlds. Ian Dallas Giant Sparrow's creative director Ian Dallas takes the stage to discuss his upcoming game, What Remains of Edith Finch. Combining a family drama with famous supernatural Japanese tales, he will discuss how creators are making mysticism relevant to the modern world. Robin Hunicke with Maureen Fan Robin Hunicke, founder of indie studio Funomena, and Baobab Studios CEO Maureen Fan show how to create delight and joy in VR.   RETRO ACTIVE By breaking down each title piece by piece – exploring every element from art, design and sound to storytelling – we take a look back on the some of the greatest titles from 2016.   Firewatch / Campo Santo The Firewatch team at Campo Santo dissects their award-winning debut with a focus on narrative design with writer and studio director Sean Vanaman. Overwatch / Michael Chu Overwatch senior game designer Michael Chu discuss how characters come into being in one of the best-selling PC games of all-time. The Stanley Parable / Davey Wreden The Stanley Parable creator Davey Wreden on how he designs virtual spaces that are perfectly suited for his unique narratives and how that’s pushed him to explore the everyday. The Banner Saga / John Watson Stoic co-founder John Watson on how classic films like Disney’s Sleeping Beauty inspired the Norse world of The Banner Saga series. Watch Dogs 2 / Jonathan Morin Watch Dogs 2 creative director Jonathan Morin tackled issues like surveillance, the Silicon Valley housing crisis, and diversity in tech in their ground-breaking title. He’ll talk about how the team built a simulation where everything is connected.   SPECIAL CONVERSATIONS 25th Anniversary of The Lawnmower Man + The Past, Present & Future of VR Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of The Lawnmower Man, a special conversation on how Lawnmower Man influenced a generation of digital creators and to how capture images of the future with the tools of today with Brett Leonard, director of The Lawnmower Man, Jessica Brillhart, Principal Filmmaker for VR at Google, and Cy Wise from Job Simulator's Owlchemy Labs.   SNEAK PEEK AND THE ARCADE A preview of new and unreleased work with some of the most dynamic independent game studios from around the world like Might & Delight, Finji Games, and Giant Sparrow, and additional hands-on play with unreleased and newly-released titles.   The program and panelists are subject to change. For the most updated schedule, please visit http://www.tribecafilm.com/games.
Tribeca Games Festival photo
Ken Levine, Sam Lake, and more
The 2017 Tribeca Film Festival runs from Wednesday, April 19th through Sunday, April 30th. The slate is packed this year, and includes special gala screenings of the first two Godfather movies with Francis Ford Coppola and th...

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New It reboot has trailer, will terrorize kids birthday parties


Tim Curry nods seal of approval
Mar 29
// Rick Lash
It, the re-clown-boot, which previously underwhelmed, nay, whelmed with first look material has put on its big boy clown pants for this new teaser trailer (clocking in at a full 2:32). Allow me to say, I'm intrigued again. No...
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Adam Sandler's Netflix contract extended by 4 more movies


Keeps him out of theaters
Mar 28
// Matthew Razak
There was a time where I thoroughly enjoyed Adam Sandler's work. His early comedies like Billy Madison and Happy Gilmore were actually funny, and his dramatic turns seemed to be setting him up to move into legitimat...

New Spider-Man: Homecoming trailer has Peter Parker and Tony Stark at odds

Mar 28 // Hubert Vigilla
I wonder if this trailer gives too much away about the story. In particular, Spidey back in the low-fi/DIY suit seems like it should have been saved for the film itself rather than spoiled for the trailer. That would make for a dramatic reveal. What do you think? Let us know in the comments. Spider-Man: Homecoming will be out July 7th.
Spider-Man: Homecoming photo
Is Spider-Man more than just a suit?
The first Spider-Man: Homecoming trailer gave us a taste of the Marvel Studios webslinger, which seems to have a charm and ease that Sony never managed to get right in their Amazing films. The happy-go-lucky/I-love-savin...

Trailer: A Ghost Story photo
Trailer: A Ghost Story

Trailer for David Lowery's A Ghost Story brings the beautiful existential indie feels


I got a rock, and overwhelmed
Mar 28
// Hubert Vigilla
Based on the Sundance hype alone, I added David Lowery's A Ghost Story to our list of the most anticipated movies of 2017. There's something about Lowery's work that gets at me right. He even managed to make a pleasing remake...

Every Power Rangers Season, Ranked

Mar 27 // Nick Valdez
Honorable Mention: Power Rangers Ninja Steel As of this writing, Ninja Steel is only ten episodes in (so halfway through the first half), so I can't fully rank it among the others yet. I've been enjoying what I've seen so far, however. Far removed from Neo-Saban's (when Saban reacquired the rights to the series' production in 2012) early growing pains, this season resets the age of the team -- they're teens in high school again -- and it's got all of the goofiness of the OG seasons but with better acting. I mean, they just introduced a gold ranger, who's a country western star and his helmet has a hat on it. What's not to like?  20. Power Rangers Operation Overdrive Summary: Two brothers try to steal a legendary crown (the Corona Aurora), but are imprisoned. Years later, explorer Andrew Hartford uncovers the crown, freeing the two bad bros. Andrew then brings in five folks, including his son, to become Power Rangers and gather the pieces of Corona Aurora before the baddies do.  Operation Overdrive is just a huge mess. I'm not exactly sure who or what to blame for its overall terribleness, but it's a combination of terribly written plots, terrible acting, terrible suits, a rap opening theme, and a bunch of characters who were all awful jerks. Seriously, this is the only season in Power Rangers where each member of the team is a selfish person with little redeeming value. The worst season of the Disney era, and the worst season overall.  19. Power Rangers Samurai/Super Samurai Summary: After otherworldly monsters invade feudal Japan, the Shiba clan trains generations of samurai to fight them and keep the otherworld (the Sanzu River) from flooding into the human one.  After Saban reacquired the production rights to the series from Disney in 2010 (which fans have dubbed the "Neo-Saban Era"), they took one of the shows I never thought would be adapted, Samurai Sentai Shinkenger. The original series was unequivocally Japanese, so naturally there would be translation pains. But Samurai was the victim of a lot of factors. The series had moved to Nickelodeon, seasons were cut down to 20 episodes apiece (thus separating each series into two halves), episodes were aired out of order (the premiere was the fourth one produced), acting was all around awful (not to mention the worst child acting of the series), and it directly adapted plots from the original Japanese series even if it didn't make much sense in English. But, regardless of all of these factors, the show became popular enough (again) to keep going, mostly due to how unique of the season's theme was.  18. Power Rangers Mystic Force Summary: After dark forces of magic threaten the world, a great sorceress gathers five destined teens to be become Power Ranger wizards and fight the armies of the undead.  Like Samurai, Mystic Force is another season with a theme unique from the rest. The magical world (along with the admittedly cool look for the rangers themselves) could've been a great thing. However, the season became too focused on world building, introducing new characters every few episodes rather than allowing the season to breathe and/or give its core Ranger team the focus necessary. It became a Red Ranger season, meaning the Red Ranger got the bulk of the character work, but this was also a huge misfire since the Red this season (named Nick, sadly) was bland and uninteresting. The finale also had a random "mystical creatures vs. normies" kind of thing that sort of popped up out of nowhere, but the less said about that the better.  17. Power Rangers Megaforce/Super Megaforce Summary: Five teens are chosen to defend the world from an invading insect army then unlock powers at an alarming rate, eventually resulting in the ability to morph into every generation of Power Rangers before them.  Okay, there's quite a bit to unpack here. Megaforce was technically announced as the 20th Anniversary of the series, but nothing was officially done about it until Super Megaforce. Imagine the combined 100 episodes of two different shows mangled into a 40 episode nonsense machine and that's Megaforce. Rapid pacing combined with random tributes to Power Rangers never seen before (not even editing the Sentai exclusive teams out of the footage), and an overall laziness contributed to this season's downfall. Even more troublesome was what happened behind the scenes during their big anniversary episode. Saban had initially invited a bunch of old cast members but rescinded many of those invites before filming because they had become too expensive. So that's why you get two minutes of Tommy toward the end of the season and not much more there. But the suits and power changes were cool, so whatever.  16. Power Rangers Turbo Summary: The Rangers drive cars really fast.  Turbo was such a bad season it nearly ended the series altogether. After debuting with Turbo: A Power Rangers Movie (which is oddly counted in the series' story despite being f**king terrible), it took footage from the Japanese Carranger, which was made as an intentional parody and saved Super Sentai overseas, and gave it gritty overtones. Its constant need to be taken seriously clashed with episodes where they got baked into a giant pizza or that one where Justin was stuck on a bicycle moving on its own. None of it was helped by a major casting change midway through when the OG cast decided to move on from the project after a few of them had stayed on for like a billion episodes. The one thing that saves this particular series is the fact I liked the new cast quite a bit. Patricia Ja Lee was the first Asian American Pink Ranger, and Selwyn Ward was a great Red Ranger. The two injected much of the needed personality this season (and beyond).  15. Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue Summary: When Demons attack Mariner Bay, the Lightspeed organization recruits five individuals with expertise to become a rescue squad of Rangers to save the day.  For these next few entries, there are seasons which were almost good but not quite there. These seasons often had great ideas but were hindered by other aspects of the production. Lightspeed Rescue was awesome for a number of reasons: The military theme gave the Rangers a more professional vibe than in seasons past; the suits had a nice, clean look to them; it had a good theme song; they created a unique power ranger for the series; and Carter Greyson was an awesome, no-nonsense Red Ranger who shot first and asked questions later. What keeps it from being great, however, is the lack of interesting villains, often befuddling writing (such as focusing the traditional team-up episode between seasons on some random child actor), and  the fact that one of the main villains was just terrible.  14. Mighty Morphin Power Rangers S3 Summary: The Rangers get ninja powers before turning into children and then aliens show up.  While fans are nostalgic for Power Rangers' initial run, most seem to forget how bad the third season was. A strong brand with the gradual loss of popularity, the writers had no idea what to really do anymore. With an increased budget leading to less Japanese footage, it adapted Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie into the series proper, adding in Ninja Powers, the Tengu Warriors, the Ninja Megazord (even using toy footage when the Ninja Megazord combined with the old Titanus zord), and eventually turning the Rangers into kids for the last half of the season. The brief (and terrible) Mighty Morphin Alien Rangers mini-season debuted here, and those are probably the worst episodes of the initial run. And I'm including Trini's troll doll. Still a lot better than the seasons higher up on the list, however.  13. Power Rangers Wild Force Summary: Five people are gathered on the floating island of Animaria, an island full of ancient animals called upon to protect the earth from pollution and environmental junk like that.  Wild Force suffers many of Lightspeed Rescue's issues,  with uninteresting villains (until the last few episodes anyway), weird decisions (their mentor was the worst), increased focus on Red Ranger, and an overbearing environmental message, but it's a rung above thanks to some standout episodes. Its crossover, "Reinforcements from the Future," is one of the best; the 10th Anniversary "Forever Red" episode remains one of my favorites; the suits were cool, and I actually was a fan of its Red Ranger until he committed an actual murder. I can't look at this season the same anymore, sadly.  12. Power Rangers Dino Charge/Dino Super Charge Summary: Five, then six, then seven, then ten people gather together when each discovers a long hidden dino gem, full of a transformative power that helps them fight the forces of evil.  The reason Megaforce was such a hearty failure is that it no longer had the excuse of Saban re-learning how to produce the series. But apparently they needed two series to figure out exactly how to handle things, because Dino Charge was a major improvement all around. It had better pacing, better filler episodes (meaning they don't contribute to the story but often provide character growth or comedy), a better cast of actors (Brandon Mejia is a great Red Ranger), and goes down in Ranger history for having the most Rangers on a single team at ten. Though not all of the Rangers were worthwhile (it's hard to develop ten different people in 40 episodes) and it fell apart toward the end, Dino Charge was still more enjoyable than most.  11. Power Rangers Zeo  Summary: After the destruction of the Command Center leaves them stranded, Zordon unveils a new set of powers from the Zeo Crystal, and this new level of power is needed more than ever against an invading machine legion.  Although Power Rangers was no stranger to change the first three seasons, the series didn't officially receive its first major overhaul until Zeo. Accompanied by an opening theme touting these new powers (based off of footage of a new season of Super Sentai) as "stronger than before," Zeo was an interesting thing. The Machine Empire had a larger villainous scope than Rita or Zedd, but they never accomplished anything concrete. There may have been a new Command Center, powers that technically grow in strength forever (thus leaving a plot hole for fans to argue about ad infinitum), and a starkly different suit overall, but Zeo also felt like a step down from the original series. It was a strange but much-needed transitional period, resulting in the loss of David Yost (who stepped out of the series due to terrible conditions behind the scenes), the loss of Karen Ashley's Aisha (who was written out of the show as a child), and the loss of quite a few viewers. This is where the nostalgia ends for most folks. But there were some great episodes within, like "King for a Day," which featured one of the best Bulk and Skull plots of the entire series. 10. Power Rangers Jungle Fury Summary: Three students of the kung-fu Order of the Claw are chosen to fight an ancient evil, Dai Shi, and rebalance the chi of the world.  Almost the final season of the series (before Disney decided to give it one last victory lap, RPM), it would've been a fine one to go out on. While it's got some goofy qualities (like talking flies and master karate folks turning into animals at the end for some reason), it was an ambitious season. Featuring only three initial Rangers (with a fourth and fifth debuting much later), this season played out like a kung-fu movie for kids. The suits are pretty cool, the fights were well choreographed in-suit and out, and instead of making a motorcycle to promote toy sales like other seasons, Jungle Fury chose to add three unique Rangers (who were initially evil puppets: another cool layer).  The finale may have been a bit rushed and unfulfilling, but it featured all eight Rangers fighting an undead army of monsters before a giant King Faux-dorah showed up for ten seconds. Also, the villains had a face turn, and that was pretty cool.  9. Power Rangers Lost Galaxy Summary: Five strangers pull five mystical swords out of a rock and gain the power to save their floating space colony from an evil scorpion.  While Lost Galaxy isn't one of my favorites, I have to give credit where it's due. It's a season filled with so many of my personal favorite episodes ("The Rescue Mission," "To the Tenth Power/The Power of Pink," just to name a few) and one of my favorite sixth Rangers (Magna Defender, who eventually turned his powers over to Leo's brother Mike), but its shoes were just too big to fill. This was the first season of the series where the cast rotated out every year, and the first of the post-Zordon era, and after In Space's great finale everything felt lacking, naturally.  No matter how good in might've been in retrospect, it's another victim of growing pains. Quite a common problem for the series overall, as you might've noticed.  8. Power Rangers Ninja Storm Summary: After their entire ninja school was kidnapped by the evil ninja Lothor, three less than great ninja students are chosen to become the Wind Ninja Power Rangers and fight to save their fellow ninjas.  Though Disney acquired the production rights to the series mid-Wild Force, its first actual foray into the show was a fantastic debut. Though fans had to get used to a lot of new norms (32 episode series lengths, New Zealand locations and actors, less direct violence), there was an overall newness to the series that felt like a breath of fresh air. This first season focused on three initial Rangers (which had never been done before) before adding two Rival Rangers to the foray and had some pretty great acting from its main cast. The main villain, Lothor, was too hokey for it, and some of the episodes bordered on cartoonish terribleness, but the stark contrast of its style to seasons before and after helped make its mark among the others.  7. Mighty Morphin Power Rangers S1 Summary: When evil sorceress Rita Repulsa escapes her prison of 10,000 years, a giant floating head and his robot butler recruit a team of teenagers with attitude. He endows them with dinosaur powers and they learn the value of teamwork and environmental friendliness.  Yes, the season of the series with the most fans isn't the best one. Though it began the Power Rangers legacy and introduced traditions (like the mythical sixth Ranger) and other mythos to the series, it was back before any nuance was added. There were monster-of-the-week episodes --  most of which are unmemorable (save for the "Rapping Pumpkin"), the teens themselves didn't have as much attitude as advertised (they were goodie goodies who recycled and the like), and it was back before good dialogue was a thing in this show. But, credit where it's due and all that.  6. Power Rangers Dino Thunder Summary: When the Mercer Corporation unleashes an army of dinosaurs, three kids stumble on dino powers and Tommy Oliver recruits them to form his very own team of Power Rangers.  When the ratings for the series began to falter, Disney brought the series back to its roots. A dinosaur theme, three Rangers at the start (which honestly might be why some of Disney's seasons worked so well), and the return of Jason David Frank as series mentor. Naturally, this meant Tommy Oliver got such a heavy focus (he became a Ranger again and got one of the best episodes of the series with "Fighting Spirit"), but the the rest of the cast were no slouches either. It takes quite a bit to take attention away from Tommy, but this team managed to do it.  The teens felt like teens for once (they fought among each other, hated school and things like training), the main villain was complicated (which was a welcome change post-Lothor), and it even managed an evil Ranger plot with everything else going on. It's not higher on the list because it has to compete with tighter series, but Dino Thunder is highly recommended.  5. Power Rangers SPD Summary: Space cops in the future.  I'll just say it outright: S.P.D. was slept on. With the best non-MMPR opening theme (which was no coincidence, as it brought back longtime composer Ron Wasserman) and the best suits from the Disney era, it nails a military theme that Lightspeed Rescue attempted years before. It also has a complicated set of Rangers in its core team, and is set years into the future, giving it a different vibe from previous seasons. Plus, there was a major story thread teased throughout which actually got the most focus toward the end of the season. A Power Rangers season with actual good foreshadowing? Yeah, it happened.  You see, this team was officially the "B Squad" or the second best. When the A Squad goes missing mid-season and re-emerges as bad guys toward the end. the final arc became overcoming their "second best" anxiety rather than taking on their generic villain.  4. Power Rangers Time Force Summary: Earth cops from the future.  Time Force is the closest to B-movie quality the series has ever come. With an older cast (some of whom with previous acting experience, which is why so much of the series is well acted), a team of Rangers from the future, some of the best suits the series has ever had, the best non-Tommy sixth Ranger (Eric the Quantum Ranger), and an unconventional villain (Rancic) who eventually gave up his evil ways when he put his daughter in danger. Though it's not a perfect series, as Rancic is the core of many of its problems (he's sort of an unsympathetic jerk despite the series trying to portray him as the opposite), and some of the team isn't as developed as others, the season featured quite a bit of nuance in its storytelling, which hadn't been present in the series before. It'd be years before it got that level of nuance again.  3. Mighty Morphin Power Rangers S2 Summary: Zordon's team of teenagers with attitude face even greater challenges than before like how to negotiate proper pay per episode.  The best season of Power Rangers' initial run was after they worked out the kinks. Lord Zedd was introduced, Tommy lost his Green Ranger powers and became the White Ranger, there's an episode where Kimberly impersonates Rita Repulsa, three of the original cast were written out of the show due to contract disputes, Rita and Zedd get married, the Green Ranger and White Ranger fight in colonial Angel Grove, and Kimberly goes back in time and fights a Mexican stereotype cactus monster with the help of Wild West versions of her friends.  Writing this all out highlights how goofy the season was overall, but that's what I love about it. It wasn't overly serious like the first season, didn't have the budget of the third season, and it's the version of the OG series I remember most fondly. Still not great, but great by early Power Rangers standards for sure.  2. Power Rangers RPM Summary: After a computer virus creates an army of machines, the remnants of humanity retreat to the domed city of Corinth, where a team of Power Rangers is the last line of defense for everyone.  Intended to be the final season of the series, showrunners decided to go for broke and throw everything they had into creating a post-apocalyptic film for kids. Lifting creative elements from films like Mad Max and Terminator, then adding a Power Rangers layer helped give this season a vibe no other season had before. It was more creatively cemented than years past, and actually had good cinematography, which had made RPM look much different than its predecessors. It truly had a sense of finality and reverence that the series had only had once before.  What keeps it from the top however, is  that behind-the-scenes events (going over budget, shifting showrunners) led to problems toward the second half. Most problematical, one of its major plots aped a famous villain from many years before. This may not have mattered to most fans, but this one small flaw does keep it from the top spot in my eyes. But not by much.  1. Power Rangers In Space Summary: When an army of villains defeats the Power Rangers, the team escapes into space and gains a new set of powers before returning to Earth and laying the smackdown on errybody.  Like RPM, In Space was originally going to be the final season of the show, but it had such good ratings it basically saved the series. Going for broke, the production team decided to send it off with a space opera. A villainess fondly remembered for her multiplicity (which was huge for a kids show), the return of Adam for a guest-starring role in an episode as the Black Power Ranger, a set of evil Rangers that took multiple episodes to defeat, a Silver Ranger with a cool sword gun, and an actual end to the story started years before in Mighty Morphin episode one.  It featured a finale (which, admittedly, seems weak in retrospect when compared to the better written seasons of the later years) that not only captured Power Rangers at its best but also reflected the series' campy-yet-serious spirit. It had a scope no other kids show had at the time and truly set the series on the path it's on today. There you have it! Those are how every season of Power Rangers ranks among the others. If you're looking for particular episodes to watch, here are my favorites:  1. "Doctor K" -- Power Rangers RPM E11 2. "Countdown to Destruction" -- Power Rangers In Space E42-43  3. "Green With Evil" Mighty Morhpin Power Rangers S1 E17-21
Power Rangers Month photo
After 10,000 years and 831 episodes
It's been a weird twenty something years. Power Rangers has seen good days and bad days, both supreme bouts of popularity and near cancellation. Yet somehow, this series has survived so long that it's managed to get three dif...

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First look Alicia Vikander as new Lara Croft, Tomb Raider


Mar 27
// Rick Lash
It's been a long time and many children later since Angelina Jolie donned the tank top and short shorts of Lara Croft, the Tomb Raider. So, needless to say, we are owed, nay due a remake, or a reboot, or a relaunch, or someth...
Justice League photo
Oh...alright
Justice League is technically one of Flixist's Most Anticipated of 2017 out of morbid curiosity. After getting a glimpse at this first official trailer, I'm not really sure what to think. It seems it has a less dour tone than...

Spider-Man  photo
Spider-Man

Check out these slick Spider-Man: Homecoming posters


Mar 25
// Nick Valdez
YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Spider-Man: Homecoming opens July 7th. 

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