Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around


Comics

Fast and cheap Inhumans photo
Fast and cheap Inhumans

Interview with Inhumans director doesn't inspire confidence in fast, cheap IMAX TV series pilot


Scott Buck strikes again
Aug 17
// Hubert Vigilla
Judging from the first trailer and the San Diego Comic Con trailer, The Inhumans might be a bona fide disaster. Excuse me, a bona fide disaster shot in IMAX. A bigger screen won't fix bland, and this looks like the second Mar...
 photo

Wonder Woman 2 release date confirmed


Electric Boogaloo coming December 2019
Jul 26
// Anthony Marzano
In a sneaky press release on Tuesday evening DC executives confirmed that Wonder Woman 2 is slated for release on December 13th, 2019. They also confirmed what everyone already knew, that Gal Gadot was coming back for the lea...
 photo

Henry Cavill's mustache will need to be digitally removed for Justice League reshoots


Oh, they're also costing a crap ton
Jul 25
// Matthew Razak
Jusitce League came out of SDCC looking pretty rosy all things considered. There was a great new poster and a new trailer, and everyone cheered really loudly. But let's all please remember who we're talking about he...
 photo

Comic-Con 2017 trailer roundup


TRAILERS! TRAILERS! TRAILERS!
Jul 24
// Anthony Marzano
What a weekend its been, while nothing really overly exciting and brand new was announced at San Diego Comic-Con there was a ton of trailers from previously announced TV and movies. So to cure your Monday blues we at Flixist have compiled all of the trailers that we reported on as well as a few that slipped through the cracks...for you.

 photo

A Dwayne Johnson-less Shazam is next planned DCU movie


Rock still cooking up some Black Adam
Jul 24
// Anthony Marzano
In somewhat sad news coming out of San Diego Comic Con we have learned that Shazam's movie will fill the previous gap year of 2019 for the DCU, but it will not have everyone's favorite wrestler turned-actor Dwayne Johnson. No...
Justice League photo
What world am I living in right now?
Justice League is in the middle of a huge mess right now. DC Comics and Warner Bros. are tooling and re-tooling elements, Ben Affleck was almost phased out of the Batman role (before confirming he'd be staying on), and the fi...

 photo

Thor: Ragnarok San Diego Comic-Con trailer is *$#%@!^ awesome


Loki and Thor ... and machineguns!
Jul 22
// Rick Lash
Thor: Ranarok had a tough encore. It's first trailer was the stuff of movie nerd wet dreams and it bowed during the Super Bowl. It's hard to make a better entrance than that. Now disregard everything I just said, as its secon...
 photo

The Walking Dead season 8 and Fear the Walking Dead season 3 San Diego Comic Con trailers


8 minutes of Walking Dead trailers!
Jul 22
// Rick Lash
It's been a good day for fans of AMC's The Walking Dead and Fear the Walking Dead. Both series had trailers debut at the San Diego Comic-Con. To s and why, belowe than two standard trailers bundled into one, and it promises a...
Inhumans photo
Inhumans

Marvel's Inhumans San Diego Comic-Con trailer is less than impressive


Almost inhumane
Jul 22
// Nick Valdez
There's a weird air around Marvel's The Inhumans. Maybe it's because it's a formerly scheduled film project that got bumped to TV, the fact that some of it being shot on IMAX cameras makes it seem bigger than it actually is, ...
The Defenders photo
The Defenders

Marvel's The Defenders comes together a little more with its San Diego Comic-Con trailer


Sigourney Weaver, the GOAT
Jul 22
// Nick Valdez
I still haven't seen Marvel's Iron Fist, especially after Editor at Large Hubert Vigilla tore it apart in his review, but I guess I'm going to have to read some cliff notes or something if I want the full Defenders experience...
Spawny Boy photo
Spawny Boy

Todd McFarlane to direct new R-rated, lower budget Spawn movie


S to the p to the a to the awn
Jul 22
// Nick Valdez
20 years ago Michael Jai White and John Leguizamo put on some crazy outfits and delivered an even crazier film with Spawn. While Todd MacFarlane's Spawn will never be as popular as it was in 1997, a film version now makes sen...
 photo

WB may be looking to ditch Ben Affleck as Batman... but gracefully


Michael Keaton comeback!
Jul 21
// Matthew Razak
Ben Affleck's Batman has been on a rocky road of life, but after being the only saving grace of Dawn of Justice I thought we'd at least get another four or so movies out of him. However, from the moment Sad Affleck came ...
 photo

The New Warriors announces its main cast


No word on who will play Tippy Toe
Jul 11
// Anthony Marzano
A few months ago Freeform formerly known as ABC Family announced that they had ordered a 10 episode season of Marvel's New Warriors sight unseen. At first it was exciting to me as I've heard nothing but great things about the...
 photo

20th Century Fox has six Marvel movies planned for the next four years


Dazzle me baby
Jul 01
// Anthony Marzano
In a press release, it was revealed that 20th Century Fox who owns the Fantastic Four and all X-Men movie rights has six Marvel movies planned for release through 2021. Although none were named specifically a few can be surmi...
Inhumans trailer photo
Inhumans trailer

Trailer: Marvel's Inhumans looks like the most underwhelming thing ever shot on IMAX


Cheap boredom on the big screen
Jun 29
// Hubert Vigilla
The Inhumans was supposed to be a major MCU milestone, bringing the mysterious, magical kingdom of Attilan to the big screen. The people of Attilan are mutated with Terrigen Mist, which can unlock superpowers and change a per...

Review: Spider-Man: Homecoming

Jun 29 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221639:43619:0[/embed] Spider-Man: HomecomingDirector: Jon WattsRelease Date: July 7th, 2017Rated: PG-13 Spider-Man: Homecoming isn't concerned with re-telling Peter Parker's origin story. Instead, we're introduced to a Peter (Tom Holland) that's already been established around his borough of Queens, NY. But after getting a taste of Avenger-like action during Civil War, Peter's been anxious to fight some big time crime. Stumbling on Adrian Toomes (Michael Keaton)'s band of thieves powered by alien technology (left behind after The Avengers), Peter's out to prove to his mentor Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) that he can handle it. But the 15 year old Peter finds he struggles with balancing his Spider-Man duties, school life with his best friend Ned (Jacob Batalon), love life, and home life with his Aunt May (Marisa Tomei).  The Homecoming subtitle is both a play on Peter's newfound high school age, and a "homecoming" to the MCU. With how prevalent Downey Jr.'s Iron Man was featured in advertising, I was worried poor little Peter would take a backseat to all of The Avengers craziness. We've seen the result of universe building bogging down some of the Marvel properties, but thankfully Homecoming doesn't concern itself with that too much either. The events of the MCU proper have informed some of the character motivations for sure, as Adrian gets his villainous start after the Battle of NY, but there's been a great effort to ground Spider-Man in his own little pocket of the world. Thus, Homecoming is free to not only tell its story at its own pace, but isn't afraid to explore Peter as a character.  Director Jon Watts takes great pains to make Homecoming feel more intimate. From the opening scene featuring Peter's video diary, to the pacing of conversations between characters, there are plenty of scenes given time to breathe and fully flesh out the film's extended cast. Tom Holland is a dream, and his awkward yet full-hearted take on the hero is much different than we've seen in the past. Holland portraying a teenage Peter is not only believable, but incredibly refreshing. When Holland's Peter jokes around, or accidentally saves the day, it always comes across as natural. Because of this, the threats to him become even more engrossing as a literal child is now fighting to save his loved ones. It's a tonal balance we've yet to see from Spider-Man, and I'm very curious as to where it can go from here.  But it's not like Holland steals the show, either. Homecoming has an incredible cast, and the script is laid out so every character has time to shine. Michael Keaton playing a birdman after, well, Birdman, may be ripe for jokes, but Keaton's soft spoken menace gives him a presence we've yet to see from other MCU villains. Spider-Man's villains are probably the most famous in Marvel Comics, so it feels so right to see Keaton stake his claim. Adrian is complex, has a reasonable motivation, and seems better written overall than a good chunk of Marvel's other baddies. Peter's classmates are all fabulous as well. Zendaya shines as a brilliant loner, Tony Revolori's Flash is the right kind of bully, it's great to see Jon Favreau's Happy Hogan again, and Jacob Batalon's Ned is so damn adorable I can't wait to see him again. The cast is just so well put together, and Queens has such a lived in feel, Homecoming absolutely nails the "neighborhood" in "Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man." We haven't experienced Spider-Man like this before.  And, uh, Marisa Tomei is a goddess and I'm so glad Homecoming addresses the shift in Aunt May's age.  Now Spider-Man: Homecoming isn't a perfect film, as the plot tends to get lost during the deliberate pacing of the second act, and it's still an origin story thematically, but it's still entirely successful. I mean, we finally get an action scene that isn't about fighting a bad guy, but saving people. I can't believe that hasn't happened yet. Even if I'm reviewing Homecoming in the comic book movie bubble, I feel like this world is so well established that the film's weakness are a reflection of its central character.  This new Peter is flawed, but attacks his flaws head on. Homecoming has so much fun just living and swinging with Spider-Man, it's hard not to accept those flaws and just go with the swing of things. Spider-Man has come home, and I can't wait to see what Sony and Marvel do with him next. 
Spider-Man Review photo
Third time's the charm
Spider-Man films have been through all sorts of ups and downs. What was once the biggest comic book property on film has since been the victim of studio craziness, failed attempts, and just an overall bad reception by th...

 photo

There may or may not be a Superman Red Son movie in the works


The divination of reading tweet leaves
Jun 28
// Anthony Marzano
Alright stick with me here as this gets a bit confusing. Recently comic Mark Millar tweeted a joke to Kong: Skull Island director Jordan Vogt-Roberts about him looking like a bearded Batman, to which Vogt-Roberts lamented tha...
 photo

Hellboy: Rise of the Blood Queen is Rated-R; director Neil Marshall nods thanks to Deadpool, Logan


R-Rated comic movies make bank, bruh.
Jun 28
// Rick Lash
Hellboy reboot director Neil Marshall was recently spinning philosophical regarding his take on on the Hellboy material. He aims to take the good from former director Guillermo del Torro's take, and then make it much bloodier...
 photo

Jon Watts most likely returning for Spider-Man: Homecoming 2


Also, that's no the title
Jun 26
// Matthew Razak
The sequel to Spider-Man: Homecoming was green lit the second Marvel and Sony decided to team up and bring Spidey into the MCU. I mean there's just no way it isn't going to make money and then the sequel will make money ...
 photo

Family friendly Fantastic Four threeboot planned


Time is a flat circle
Jun 22
// Anthony Marzano
After the dismal response on the gritty Fantastic Four reboot from a few years back, the planned sequel that was supposed to come out this summer season was scrapped. Rather than let a single comic series go untapped, 20th Ce...
 photo

Scarlett Johansson says Avengers: Infinity War will have scene with 32 characters


Avengers: Royal Rumble?
Jun 20
// Rick Lash
Scarlett Johansson, aka Scar-Jo, aka The Crimson Swedishman visited The Late Show with Stephen Colbert to promote her Rough Night (as rough as it proclaims; read all about it!). And somewhere along the way, fan...
 photo

John Carpenter penning sequel comic to Big Trouble in Little China


Little Trouble in Big Hell
Jun 19
// Anthony Marzano
Like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Fight Club before it, Big Trouble in Little China is getting the sequel comic treatment and it's being co-written by the master of the cult himself, John Carpenter. Titled Old Man Jack, the ...
 photo

Jessica Chastain to play villain in Dark Phoenix X-Men flick


Real news: they've re-hired full cast
Jun 15
// Rick Lash
Jessica Chastain is in talks to portray a villain in the next installment of the X-Men series. Not confirmed. Villain is perhaps Lilandra, the empress of an alien empire called the Shi’ar, but also not confirmed. W...
 photo

Danny Elfman will score Justice League now


Can at least one person stay, please?
Jun 15
// Matthew Razak
After Wonder Woman turned out to be so good I was kind of getting my hopes up that Justice League wouldn't actually be a total mess, but things are getting shaken up too much for me not to be worried. Obviously Zack...
New Spider-Man trilogy photo
New Spider-Man trilogy

Tom Holland reveals Spider-Man: Homecoming is the start of a new Spidey trilogy


HE'S IN THE OLD WEST, BUT HE'S ALIVE
Jun 13
// Hubert Vigilla
As we get closer to its release, my enthusiasm for Spider-Man: Homecoming has sort of cooled. I mean, I'll watch it, but I think one of the trailers pretty much gave everything away, and the newest promo stuff looks like a ju...
 photo
Seriously watch it right now
We got a brief look at Black Panther last night during game 4 of the NBA Finals and to sum it up, it looks amazing. Set in the technologically advanced but secluded African nation of Wakanda, Black Panther will tell the story...

Wonder Woman is the hero the DCEU deserves, and also the one it needs right now

Jun 07 // Hubert Vigilla
Up until Wonder Woman, the DCEU has been defined by oppressive brooding. Man of Steel featured a Superman hobbled by self-doubt for at least half of the story. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice was a clash between a sociopathic demi-god with daddy issues and a homicidal psychopath with mommy issues. Suicide Squad was a bad movie full of bad guys. No one seems to enjoy heroism in any of these movies. Except for Wonder Woman. As I mentioned last year, Wonder Woman was the only genuine hero in Batman v Superman. She leaps into battle with gusto and handles herself capably. She could have saved the day herself if Batman and Superman were such dumb meatheads. Throughout Wonder Woman's origin story, Diana admires strength and bravery and being totally kick ass. She marvels at the Amazons as they spar, and she mimics their moves. Diana, throwing punches at the air, smiling on a hill--that was me at five-years-old standing on a coffee table watching Bruce Lee movies. I imagine that a bunch of kids, particularly girls, will also punch and kick along with Gadot on screen. Her martial prowess is grounded in an unshakable sense of compassion and kindness. Her first time eating ice cream is a great comedic moment, but it's also all about Diana's ceaseless love. She's so appreciative for the cone, she's so gracious to the vendor--and yes, come to think of it, ice cream is pretty awesome the first time you ever eat it (and the 5,000th time, too). As she watches villagers besieged and in pain, her instinct is to help them rather than allow them to suffer; when she sees a horse being whipped, she thinks of a more humane way to treat animals. While Man of Steel shied away from collateral damage by keeping Superman and Zod battling through the skies, Wonder Woman is there in the mud, wandering through the murderous gas, like she's a superhero working for some humanitarian NGO. In the most memorable action scene in the film, Wonder Woman is the first one out of the trenches leading the charge into No Man's Land. As she draws the machine gunfire and holds her ground, she's the beacon of hope, an example for others to follow. She accepts this duty without any sense of guilt or doubt. She's saving the day. Why do it begrudgingly. In the most absurd of wars, a moral light. Wonder Woman always wanted to be a hero. She always is a hero. If there's a moment of disenchantment in heroism, it's not because she's a dark and brooding figure unsure of herself and her powers. Rather, it's when she realizes that humanity excels at reckless murder. It's a philosophical crisis rather than a psychological crisis, which is fitting for a mythic character's dilemma. A worldview is questioned, so what's the response? To keep fighting for your ideals. Love, valor, ice cream--nevertheless, she persisted. In addition to the hope and unabashed heroism, Wonder Woman is the most competently made DCEU movie. The colorful utopian idyll of Themyscira serves as a counterpoint to a morally gray Europe during the first World War. The screenplay may not reinvent the superhero movie or the superhero origin story, but it covers that well-trod ground briskly and with humor. Jenkins lets the camera linger on Diana's face a little longer as she reacts to people and the world around her; Gadot's subtle facial expressions offer an unexpected depth to the performance that isn't present in the other DCEU movies. There's not much going on in the heads of Batman and Superman that a scream or a grunt won't convey, but Wonder Woman has an internal life. Jenkins' filmmaking adds some allure to the otherwise rote romance that develops between Steve Trevor (Chris Pine) and Diana. Subverting the usual gender tropes we see in blockbuster movies, the only overtly sexy moment in the film involves a naked, chiseled Pine emerging from a shimmering Themysciran bath. In any other movie that would be the moment for a gratuitous Angelina Jolie butt shot, but no--Wonder Woman subverts it to great effect. Even when Diana and Steve eventually sleep together, that's handled with relative maturity. An adult is charge for once in the otherwise adolescent DCEU. In Wonder Woman, there's no embarrassing horndog gawking at a woman's body a la Suicide Squad. Instead of pin-ups or conquests, Gadot and her fellow Amazons are lensed like warriors and athletes; Bruce-Lee-ification rather than objectification. The slow motion in the action scenes seem to be a nod to Zack Snyder's aesthetic, but they also reminded me of Michael Jordan highlight reels. Here, enjoy the grace and the hang time of someone doing something extraordinary. And yeah, the kid in me wished I could so something like that. At its best, moments like this split the difference between Richard Donner's Superman ("You will believe a man can fly") and that song from Space Jam ("I Believe I Can Fly"). Sure, the last half hour of Wonder Woman strays into schlocky CG superhero territory. I was sort of hoping the final battle with Ares would be shot like a moving neoclassical painting as seen with the backstory at the beginning, but alas. It's basically the Doomsday fight from Batman v Superman, but with more magic lightning. And yeah, the bookending narrative is a clunky device that leads to the film's awkward beginning and ending. And yet, I'm hopeful, and it's the first time I've had that feeling with a DCEU movie. Rather than cynical, it's sincere. In an interview with The New York Times, Jenkins said, "I'm tired of sincerity being something we have to be afraid of doing." She later added, "It's terrible when it makes so many artists afraid to be sincere and truthful and emotional, and relegates them to the too-cool-for-school department. Art is supposed to bring beauty to the world." Outside the theater as I was going to catch Wonder Woman, a little girl stood in front of the movie poster and held her arms up in front of her face while her parents took a picture. What it feels like to stand on a hill.
Wonder Woman DCEU photo
Kick ass, take names, eat ice cream
Wonder Woman is just what the DCEU needed. It's been getting very good reviews, and it's also been performing well at the global box office. As of this writing, it's earned $240 million worldwide. It's not stratospheric busin...

 photo

Patty Jenkins is not signed on for Wonder Woman 2 yet


She about to get paid, yo
Jun 07
// Matthew Razak
Unlike many of the other DCEU films Wonder Woman deserve to be the massive hit it has become, pulling in well over $100 million over the weekend, and outpacing box office expectations by a lot. However, because Patt...

Review: Wonder Woman

May 31 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221570:43578:0[/embed] Wonder WomanDirector: Patty JenkinsRelease Date: June 2, 2017Rated: PG-13 Diana (Gal Gadot) is the Princess of Themyscira, an island inhabiting an ancient Amazonian race put on the Earth by Zeus to stifle mankind's need for war. Molded from clay and birthed by Zeus, Diana has always been a little different from the rest of her Amazonian sisters and put to the true test when Steve Trevor (Chris Pine), an English spy, crash lands on her home and brings news of a great war happening around the world (WWI). Figuring it to be the work of Ares, the god of war, Diana demands to be taken to the front line. But when in the outside world, Diana has to come to grips with her own humanity as she learns the real driving force behind the war.  Let's get this out of the way first. Wonder Woman is an origin story. The plot follows a lot of the standard beats you've come to expect from origin stories (complete with a sequence introducing the flashback in question), but unlike other films of its ilk, rather than a character slowly becoming a mythological being, Wonder Woman essentially works backwards. As it's introducing Diana and her world, the film takes an already established higher being and challenges her infallibility. Always being sure to treat her as a goddess, the narrative instead veers away from the stereotypical physical change and focuses on internal struggle and strife. Momentous scenes in origin stories like first donning of the famous suit, fighting the main villain, and the original call to action, are subdued in favor of zeroing in on Diana's matter-of-fact perspective. Basically, there's no need to have Diana change into a hero since she already is one, and I can't understate how refreshing it is to learn about her humanity instead.  Ambitious as the internal narrative is, it wouldn't have worked without a strong performance from its lead. To be completely honest, I was worried about Gal Gadot's strength as a lead actress going into this. Thankfully, that worry only lasted about 20 minutes. While the first chunk of the film is stilted and full of bad acting and accents (likening it to a more generic version of Xena: Warrior Princess), once Gadot is introduced everything perks right up. She's kind of incredible in the way she commands attention here (befitting the character too). Director Patty Jenkins takes a little time each shot to make Gadot stand out a little more, whether its subtly pointing out the fact she is taller than most of her co-stars, or the costume design making her look just different enough from everyone else. Gadot and Jenkins work together to really nail the fish out of water angle here, and further smooth out any edges Gadot could have in her performance.  But Gadot's performance wouldn't have meant anything without a great script. Wonder Woman may not be perfectly written in all areas (as one big moment diminishes her character), but there's a great balance of levity and drama. What I came to appreciate the most were smaller beats allowing the actors to really dig into their characters. Chris Pine is as charming as he's ever been, so the best scenes of the film are simply subdued conversations between Steve and Diana. These smaller, character intense moments also help to elevate the later generic superhero action taking place toward the climax. There's an added layer of catharsis, but it doesn't mean the climax is safe from gender normative action where Diana is suddenly not the character she was the rest of the film. The climax will need further discussion once more folks see it for sure.  As for the action, it's fine. The action scenes are a bit Snyder-esque as they use slow motion to emphasize movement, but there is a greater sense of fluidity in the motion. Once Diana starts whipping around dudes with a golden rope, the film basks in some very cool visuals. There's unfortunately a bit of unintentional slapstick during some of the scenes, but it gives the film a little flavor not seen in other DC Comics films. I'll give it a pass.  The fear when reviewing superhero films is critically analyzing them within a bubble. Initially, I was worried I'd attribute Wonder Woman's success to being a well made film within the DC Extended Universe (and we've been burned so many times), and just clinging to it like a life raft in a sea of schmaltz. But, after writing this review, I've come to the conclusion it's just a damn good film.  Wonder Woman, the oft-misplaced icon in DC's Holy Trinity, has truly made her mark on cinema. Less Batmen and supermenches, more wonderful women please.  Second Opinion: Wonder Woman gets almost everything right for its first two acts. Its action sequences are impressive, and utilize Wonder Woman's superpowers in unique and awesome ways. Patty Jenkins has a surprising eye for action for a drama director that allows it to flow and build, a feature many directors seem to lack. But more important than the kick ass action sequences is the fact the film works as a character piece. Unlike other DCEU films, you actually care about what's going on, the plot unfolds in a coherent way, and the characters act like they should. Yes, it may hit on a few (OK, a lot) of cliches, but it implements them to a tee. A lot of the charm comes from Chris Pine and Gal Gadot, who turn their relationship into something special. The film actually hits emotionally, which is why it's too bad the third act turns into nothing more than an action brawler. It doesn't fit with the rest of the film's tone, and feels more like a Zack Snyder movie than anything else. This doesn't sully the film as a whole, however, leading to a superhero movie that feels like its own thing. 80 -- Matthew Razak
Wonder Woman Review photo
Some kind of wonderful
DC Comics and Warner Bros have been, well, let's say misguided in their attempts at launching a series of films comparable to Marvel's success. Deciding to push through critical failure (thanks to overall box office success),...

Wonder Woman photo
Wonder Woman

See Wonder Woman early and free


Washington DC and Baltimore screenings
May 25
// Matthew Razak
Early buzz on Wonder Woman is that its the best DC has put out. That might not be saying much considering the low quality of their films so far (aside from Batman), but evidently its the best because it is actually good....

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...