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Batman v Deathstroke photo
Batman v Deathstroke

Deathstroke is the villain of Ben Affleck's solo Batman movie, here's a first look


DO YOU STROKE IT? YOU WILL!
Aug 29
// Hubert Vigilla
After Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Ben Affleck signed on to write and direct his own Batman movie. We had a little bit of April Fool's fun speculating about who the villain would be, but until today, that remained a my...
Captain America quits photo
Captain America quits

Russos say Steve Rogers is no longer Captain America in the Marvel Cinematic Universe


Russo swerve!
Aug 27
// Hubert Vigilla
Captain America: Civil War was a solid MCU entry--not as good as The Winter Soldier, but an entertaining beat-em-up that touched on the difficulties of foreign intervention in the Obama era. The film didn't have a hug-it-out ...
Batman photo
Batman

Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders gets a trailer


The best Batman is back
Aug 24
// Matthew Razak
I'm pretty sure very few people under the age of 50 became fans of Batman through the old Adam West Batman TV show, but that's how I did. Reruns on some random channel at some random time were some of my favorite things ...
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Wolverine 3 might be Patrick Stewart's last hurrah as Professor X


Aug 11
// Geoff Henao
We already knew the next Wolverine sequel is going to be Hugh Jackman's final performance as the titular Wolverine, but it appears it may also feature Patrick Stewart's last take on Charles Xavier, as well. During an intervie...

Luke Cage photo
Luke Cage

First full trailer for Luke Cage lands some punches


I heard it was four guys
Aug 09
// Matthew Razak
Man, Netflix is killing it with their Marvel shows and Luke Cage looks no different. Like with their films the Netflix TV shows take a codified look and tone and warp each show into its own genre. Luke Cage looks to...

Suicide Squad v Guardians of the Galaxy: A Tale of Two Soundtracks

Aug 08 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220753:43036:0[/embed] Awesome Mix Vol. 1 is an actual artifact that exists in Guardians of the Galaxy. The Suicide Squad soundtrack is just a soundtrack. This difference cannot be emphasized enough. The Awesome Mix is a mix tape from Peter Quill/Star-Lord's dead mother made just for him. A mix tape means curation, careful consideration, that time was taken to make something, and that something personal is trying to be communicated to someone else through an arrangement of songs. In short, mix tapes show someone you care. It's also important that the Awesome Mix is era-specific, with songs from the '70s and '80s, mixing a bit of AM radio kitsch--"Escape (The Pina Colada Song)," "Hooked on a Feeling"--with some Top 40/punk/glam favs--"Moonage Daydream," "Come and Get Your Love," "Cherry Bomb." This marks a time that Star-Lord will never know, lived by a parent he'll never see again, from a planet he was taken from. Sure, the songs are loads of fun, but there's an underlying sadness to a simple little cassette tape: Quill's last connection to his home planet is an antiquated bit of technology and (since few people make physical mixes these days) a dead cultural practice. By contrast, there's nothing curated about the Suicide Squad soundtrack (aka The Basic Bastich Playlist). It doesn't exist in-story and there's a general willy-nilly-ness to all of it. Looking at the tracklist, it doesn't feel like a mix tape made for anyone but rather for everyone and in the blandest way possible. The soundtrack feels like a bunch of songs some Warner Bros. studio exec downloaded on Napster when he was in college, plus three new ones. Those three new songs are relegated to the closing credits, by the way. That's probably where Skrillex & Rick Ross belong, but a shame to waste a Grimes track. [embed]220753:43037:0[/embed] The choices are so obvious, from "Bohemian Rhapsody" and "The House of the Rising Sun" to "Super Freak" and "Sympathy for the Devil." I couldn't help but think of better movies that made better use of these songs (e.g., Wayne's World, Casino, Little Miss Sunshine, Interview with the Vampire). On that note, The Basic Bastich Playlist even has a song from Awesome Mix Vol 1 ("Spirit in the Sky"). That may explain the general been-there-done-that quality to much of Suicide Squad. The movie does things that other movies have done, but it fails to distinguish itself or excel at anything uniquely on its own. The pop songs come frequently in Suicide Squad. The film's turgid, repetitive prologue feels like three different intro scenes in 20 minutes, with a new pop song creeping up every two minutes. Rather than carefully doling out the needle drops to punctuate a scene or create a character leitmotif, Ayer and his editors feel like cheap wedding DJs looking for a quick reaction from the crowd. "Want some tension and attitude in a scene lacking both? Here's 'Seven Nation Army' and 'Without Me.' Now get ready for the dollar dance." I'm surprised they didn't play "We Are Family," "I Will Survive," and "The Macarena" at some point. The overuse of licensed music is probably the result of the reshoots and subsequent re-edits of the film prior to release. Warner Bros. suits felt like audiences wanted a movie like the first Suicide Squad trailer, so they added more comedy and hired a company that specializes in editing trailers to rework the movie. Consequently, Suicide Squad feels more like a series of trailers than an actual cinematic story. Coming back to the Awesome Mix, I think it just emphasizes the main problem with Suicide Squad, and perhaps even WB/DC as they try to rush their own cinematic universe. The Awesome Mix is a compelling component of a story in which lonely characters join to form a surrogate family. The Basic Bastich Playlist is something a studio used to distract audiences from a story that barely even holds together.
Squad v Guardians photo
Basic Bastich Playlist v Awesome Mix
As Matt pointed out in his review, Suicide Squad feels like two movies clumsily stitched together. One movie (the better movie) is a grim Dirty Dozen/Wild Bunch homage about bad guys fighting even worse guys. That sounds righ...

Man of Steel 2 photo
Man of Steel 2

Warner Bros moving forward with Man of Steel sequel


Get the money, dollar dollar bill y'all
Aug 08
// Nick Valdez
Despite its poor critical reception, Suicide Squad broke crazy records last weekend. Because of this Warner Bros and DC Comics have to decided to move along with their plan, good films be damned. But something we didn't see c...
AINT NO MERCY photo
AINT NO MERCY

Watch Jared Leto's Joker hang out with Skrillex and Rick Ross for 'Purple Lambourghini' video


AIN'T NO MERCY AIN'T AIN'T AI-
Aug 08
// Nick Valdez
Suicide Squad has come and gone. Breaking August opening records, failing critically for the most part (although our Editor-in-Chief Matt was more level headed than most), and had so many editors in the editing room (accordin...
Suicide Squad box office photo
Suicide Squad box office

Suicide Squad breaks August box office records despite bad reviews, general crumminess


Hey kids, always recycle--TO THE EXTREME
Aug 06
// Hubert Vigilla
Suicide Squad faced a barrage of negative reviews last week. Flixist's own Matthew Razak was mixed on Suicide Squad, noting that the movie is a serviceable tonal mess comprised of two competing films that never come together....

Review: Suicide Squad

Aug 05 // Matthew Razak
[embed]220744:43031:0[/embed] Suicide SquadDirector: David AyersRated: PG-13Release Date: August 5, 2016  There have been plenty of very harsh words thrown around about Suicide Squad already, and they really aren't all that deserved. This isn't a terrible movie, it just isn't great. What is happening is that the loss of potential and the clear mishandling of this film is making some overact to its flaws. In many ways Suicide Squad is a perfectly acceptable, if unremarkable, superhero (villain) flick, but it could have been more. That fact screams out through frame after frame of this film. The premise here is ripe for intrigue. Government agent (and most intriguing character of the film) Amanda Waller (Viola Davis) has the bright idea to make a "superhero" team from a collection of super villains in order for the government to save the day, but also have plausible deniability when things go wrong. She convinces everyone this is a good idea gathers up Deadshot (Will Smith), Harley Quinn (Margo Robbie), Boomerang (Jai Courtney), Diablo (Jay Hernandez), Killer Croc (Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje), Enchantress (Cara Delevingne) and Slipknot (Adam Beach). Then the world gets threatened so the team goes into action. The main thrust of this one is exceptionally lacking. That didn't have to be a problem. The characters here are varied and all have the chance to be incredibly interesting, even the guy who just throws boomerangs. The film chooses to focus especially on Deadshot and Harley Quinn. There's good reason for that: both Smith and Robbie are on their A game throughout the entire thing, often turning pedantic dialog into something that actually works. Robbie's Harley Quinn is especially on point and one can't help but wish she and Deadshot had their own films prior to this to actually flesh out the characters. Diablo is the other surprise of the film as most people won't even know who he is, but he delivers probably the most compelling story line of them all. Sadly, despite these individual strong performances the film is far too cramped to actually deliver the character study director David Ayers clearly wanted it to be. An awkward opening that was reportedly redone multiple times gives you a glimpse of the two films competing with each other as the competing styles are awkwardly mashed together. One is a comical action flick and the other is a look at bad people doing good things. The latter should have won out with hints of the former, but instead the movie often feels tone deaf to itself as it lurches from dark tones to one-liners. This balance can be handled well, but it isn't here as many of the jokes failed and often the comradely building got lost as the action movie took over. Ayers' action is also all over the place. His gritty style would have been a perfect fit for a much different Suicide Squad film, but instead he chops scenes together so roughly that it is hard to keep track of what is going on let alone stay within the momentum of a scene. He desperately needed the R rating to make the movie really work, but instead has to cut around a bunch of bad guys doing violence. The final fight, which is probably the weakest part of the film thanks to a paper-thin villain and plot, never earns its payoff and so the audience is left with a bit of fun, but no emotional conclusion. Meanwhile the most intriguing part of the story involves not the big bad, but Waller and her machinations. Mistakenly, it is pushed aside for a big flashy villain.  Speaking of big and flashy: Jared Leto's Joker. Early reports were that he had a small part in the film, but he probably gets more screen time and more to do than half of the Suicide Squad. Honestly, the man had the impossible feat of following up Heath Ledger's masterpiece. I'll give him credit for doing something different with the smooth, deranged, "pimp" Joker, but the performance lands awkwardly between Mark Hamill in the animated series, Ledger and a hint of the campy Cesar Romero. In short, it doesn't really land at all. One struggles to see this Joker facing off against Affleck's deadly serious Batman.  It's easy to come down harshly on the plethora of problems in Suicide Squad, but it's also easy enough to enjoy the movie once disappointment wares off. While the plot may feel horribly cliche, it is tried and true and checks all the right boxes. Smith and Robbie deliver enough to keep the rest of the rushed character development feel slightly acceptable and when the jokes hit they actually work. There is just enough here to enjoy yourself, which is more than I could say for BvS.  Suicide Squad feels like a knee jerk reaction to BvS, in fact. After WB was blindsided by the bad reviews and middling box office we know they ordered re-cuts of Suicide Squad to lighten it up. What they fail to realize is that the tone that BvS, a movie about redemption and hope, set was wrong for that movie, but would have worked wonders for Suicide Squad, a movie about bad guys doing bad things. While the Marvel Cinematic Universe is often codified it at least allows the tones of its films to vary with the characters that are in it. Suicide Squad may work as a very basic film, but it isn't enough to pull DC's comic films into the light. Next up to bat: Wonder Woman.  Also, stop trying to make a Guardians of the Galaxy type soundtrack happen, Suicide Squad. It's not going to happen.
Suicide Squad photo
Death by a thousand cuts
Do I need to open this review explaining how important Suicide Squad was to DC and WB? After the poor reception that Batman v. Supermanm received and the less-than-expected box office this movie was what was going t...

Nerds are the worst photo
Nerds are the worst

Sad nerds start petition to shut down Rotten Tomatoes over bad Suicide Squad reviews


Your desire for validation is childish
Aug 03
// Hubert Vigilla
Suicide Squad comes out on Friday, and the early reviews for the film are not so kind. The movie currently has a 33% on Rotten Tomatoes. Some insecure nerds who seek validation in all aspects of their lives are angry about th...
Suicide Squad photo
Suicide Squad

See Suicide Squad early and free


Washington DC and Baltimore screenings
Jul 26
// Matthew Razak
After Batman v Superman bored us all into a superhero coma it was hard to get excited for Suicide Squad, but after a host of awesome trailers and basically the entire cast saying all the right things there might not be a...
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DC Universe's Suicide Squad breaks out new extended trailer at San Diego Comic-Con


Margot Robbie's butt breaks out of pants
Jul 25
// Rick Lash
Suicide Squad is ramping up promotions as we near its August 5 release date. As part of that effort, Warner brothers unleashed a new three minute-plus trailer featuring increased roles for several characters (notably, Will Sm...
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Kurt Russell joins Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 cast as Star-Lord's father


Kurt Russell in, Escape from the Galaxy!
Jul 24
// Rick Lash
So the twist in 2014's Guardians of the Galaxy was the reveal by Yondu and gang that they didn't just kidnap Peter Quill, aka Star-Lord, aka Chris Pratt, they were hired by his father to do so. It wasn't exactly explosively r...
Ghost Rider photo

I'm not going to sit here and pretend I've kept up with Agents of SHIELD. I had watched four episodes back in season one before I gave up, but I've been hearing that it got interesting around season two. But the fourth season...

Legion Trailer photo
Legion Trailer

Check out the trailer for Fox and Marvel's Legion TV series


Jul 24
// Nick Valdez
With X-Men doing so well in theaters, Fox has been wanting to do a television series for quite a while. But since Marvel holds the rights to X-Men TV shows, it had to wait until the two companies could work together. Thankful...
Doctor Strange SDCC photo
Odd.
Marvel's taken their strangest hero and given him quite an impressively stacked film. Not only is Doctor Strange packed to the brim with crazy talent (with Cumberbatch, Mads Mikkelsen, Rachel McAdams, Tilda Swinton, and Chiwe...

Captain Marvel photo
Captain Marvel

Brie Larson confirmed as Captain Marvel


Nailed it
Jul 24
// Matthew Razak
Rumors had been swirling to the point of confirmation that Brie Larson would be taking on the role of Captain Marvel/Carol Danvers, but last night at Comic Con Marvel finally confirmed it. It's a pretty spot on choice as Danv...
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San Diego Comic-Con reveals Hulk gladiator Armor from Thor: Ragnarok


Jul 23
// Rick Lash
Instagram is blowing up with pictures from Marvel, Marvel employees, and San Diego Comic-Con attendees. One such gem: gladiator armor that the Hulk will wear in 2017's Thor: Ragnarok (November 3). While plot details of Thor: ...
Justice League footage photo
The Flash, you kidder
Big things happening today for the DC Cinematic Universe. In addition to the Wonder Woman trailer at San Diego Comic-Con, here's your first taste of Zack Snyder's Justice League movie. It seems goofier and more lighthearted t...

Justice League Action photo
Justice League Action

SDCC: First Justice League Action trailer is colorful and fun


Like a pocket Justice League Unlimited
Jul 23
// Nick Valdez
With as wonky of a movie universe it has. DC have really succeeded on the small screen. They've been dominating since Dini's run from Batman: The Animated Series to Justice League Unlimted and now CW's got a whole universe. S...
Jared Leto Joker photo
Jared Leto Joker

Get a taste of Jared Leto's Joker performance in this Suicide Squad promo


The Gathering of the Jared Letos
Jul 22
// Hubert Vigilla
I'd like to think that Jared Leto is currently at The Gathering of the Juggalos dressed as The Joker from Suicide Squad. In-character, too. He would fit right in, as least outwardly. We know he's got facial tattoos and is ful...
The Tick reboot photo
The Tick reboot

Here's an underwhelming first look at Amazon's The Tick reboot


SPOOOO--whoa, what?
Jul 21
// Hubert Vigilla
When we reported about Amazon's reboot of The Tick a few months ago, we learned that the reboot would be "darker and more grounded," which is exactly what people wanted from a parody of superheroes. Now we have our first look at this darker and more grounded version of The Tick and it's thoroughly underwhelming. Just take a look at the new costume:
Captain Marvel photo
Captain Marvel

Brie Larson in the lead for Captain Marvel


Must... not... make... marvelous pun
Jun 02
// Matthew Razak
Things are going well for Brie Larson. She got that Oscar thing last year and now it looks like she'll be landing one of those coveted superhero role things. Those tend to make actors a lot of  money. Larson is reportedl...
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Thor Ragnarok Cast Grows, Adds THE HULK & more


May 20
// Rick Lash
Marvel just announced some major additions to its third Thor film, Thor: Ragnarok including Cate Blanchett, Jeff Goldblum, Karl Urban, and Tessa Thompson. Oh, and another guy you might have heard of, Mark Ruffalo, as a l...
DC/WB Exec Shake Up photo
DC/WB Exec Shake Up

Warner Bros. picks Geoff Johns and Jon Berg to oversee DC cinematic universe


Fallout from Batman v Superman
May 18
// Hubert Vigilla
While Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice has made around $870 million worldwide, it's been considered a disappointment for Warner Bros. By comparison, Captain America: Civil War has already made $957 million worldwide in two ...
New DC logo photo
New DC logo

DC Entertainment unveils bland brand-new comics and film logo


The bullet logo was still the best
May 17
// Hubert Vigilla
DC Comics unveiled a brand new logo to coincide with big Rebirth event this summer, which pretty much looks like a mea culpa for that New 52 stuff from a few years ago. The comic is an 80-page one-shot written by Geoff Johns ...

Harley Quinn to get her own movie

May 16 // Matthew Razak
Harley Quinn photo
Gee, Mr. J! My very own movie!
Suicide Squad isn't even out yet, but DC is pretty sure they've got something good with Margot Robbie's Harley Quinn. THR is reporting that Warner Bros. will be launching a stand-alone Harley Quinn movie... or a movie ce...

Black Panther  photo
Black Panther

Lupita Nyong'o and Michael B. Jordan join Black Panther


May 13
// Nick Valdez
Captain America: Civil War may have technically been Captain America's movie, but the shining stars were definitely Spider-Man and Black Panther. In fact, I'm more excited for Black Panther's solo outing than anything else in...

Captain America: Civil War - #TeamIronMan v #TeamCap and Obama-era foreign intervention

May 11 // Hubert Vigilla
Both Iron Man and Captain America's sides are justified in-character by their experiences over the course of 12 other films. It might speak to the strength of long-form stories allowing characters to develop through choices and actions over time, and to then have a major interpersonal conflict stem from the ideological differences between characters. Given the collateral damage and technology-run-amok in Avengers: Age of Ultron, it makes sense for Tony Stark to consider international approval. It would keep his own ideas in check (i.e., creating something like Ultron) if there had to be political consensus before moving forward, and that consensus could then justify direct action and mitigate any personal guilt over the deaths of innocent people. This makes more sense than Tony Stark going full neoconservative fascist douchebag as he did in the Civil War comic by Mark Millar and Steve McNiven. HYDRA's decades-long infiltration of the US government and SHIELD in Captain America: The Winter Soldier leads to Steve Rogers' distrust of oversight, which may involve parties with motives and interests outside of the greater good. On top of that, we're talking about the United Nations as the overseeing body, an organization which stood idly by during the Rwandan genocide and whose actions these days include strongly worded letters of condemnation. Could you imagine the Avengers assembled to draft a letter? In a way, Tony's trust in his own judgment backfiring so badly led him to the security of the Sakovia Accords. On the other side, the complete failure of those in power to stop HYDRA led Steve away from the compromise and institutional oversight of the Sakovia Accords. There's also a generational conflict that tempers the Iron Man and Captain America worldviews. Tony Stark has grown up in the era after Vietnam with a certain gray or cynical view of military conflict. This is not a doveish view on Tony's part, however, but maybe one that adds ambivalence to the view of intervention and combat. Captain America, on the other hand, is a product of the greatest generation who could align in a black-and-white good-vs-evil battle against the Axis powers, HYDRA (i.e., science Nazis), and fascism. Of course, Cap doesn't really talk much about Dresden or the atomic bomb--that would complicate the moral arithmetic of utilitarianism. Civil War doesn't talk about the possibility of non-intervention and the use of diplomacy, but that sort of discussion would be silly in the context of superhero films. The Avengers fight massive hordes of faceless alien/robot/science Nazi goons hellbent on eradicating humanity. When that's the situation, the only viable option in the particular story being told is some sort of large-scale action set piece. (You don't bring a strongly worded letter to a gun fight.) It's maybe no surprise that in Alan Moore's Watchmen, the grand solution to fixing a world at war involves something extraterrestrial. Real life situations are far more complicated and can't be treated with the cavalier sense of moral righteousness seen in superhero movies. The foreign interventions of the Obama administration show how even careful deliberation or a humanitarian goal can backfire. Drone strikes are meant to eliminate select terror targets and reduce civilian deaths, but innocent men, women, and children have been murdered by American drones (see National Bird). The moral righteousness of Captain America's stance does nothing to mitigate the heartbreak and tragedy (and potential war crimes charges) of airstrikes against Doctors Without Border hospitals in Afghanistan or Yemen; Presidential apologies are of little consolation either. With regard to the Syrian Civil War, the complexities of the various factions involved, interfactional alliances, allegiances to various outside parties/countries, and a host of other factors have meant little direct or immediate action by the United States, which is still trying to figure out the quagmire it caused in Iraq under Bush; ditto the ISIS-led power vacuum the US created when Obama, under the counsel of Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State, used airstrikes along with French, British, and other NATO forces to assist Libyan rebels in the ousting of Muammar Gaddafi. All superhero movies often have something inherently hawkish and/or libertarian about them, sometimes occupying various ideologies at once. Some may have a more activist streak (many are vigilante stories, after all), while others are more authoritarian (many are world police stories, after all), and these Avengers movies tend to be all about the positive things that the Earth's mightiest heroes can do even when they accidentally kill innocent people. As our own Jackson Tyler pointed out last year, The Avengers is all about American exceptionalism, unable to commit to a full critique of its own ideological foundation. They're power fantasies, after all, and like fairy tales or myths or any fantastical stories that are told, maybe there are certain limitations in what can be addressed. These are simplifications of conflicts, and rarely with a one-to-one conversion regarding its real world referents. Superheroes can do a lot when it comes to embodying certain aspirations, ideals, and anxieties, but there isn't much room in a tentpole blockbuster to address the complications and nuances of real world national and international politics. The closest Captain America: Civil War can get to nuance is its ambivalence about the #TeamIronMan v #TeamCap argument. It comes down on neither side explicitly, allowing both to exist as the correct solution to a narrow hypothetical situation involving the world of the film. These are still heroes (again, the foundation remains), but one is a sheriff while the other is the gunslinger who turns in his tin star, one is the by-the-book cop while the other is the loose canon who lost his badge. This isn't neocons taking on liberals, it's more like Buzz Lightyear v Woody. Similarly, Captain America: Civil War isn't a diagnosis and treatment of the current state of the world but more of a collection of symptoms. I'm reminded of a two-page Superman story from 1940 by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. The Man of Tomorrow soars through the air, kidnaps Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin, and then brings them both to justice before the League of Nations. All that power, and he rights major wrongs so easily and justly, preventing the deaths of countless millions in the process. If only real world foreign policy were that easy. In retrospect, it's a very sad Superman story.
Civil War and politics photo
Imperfect solutions, true believers
Now that we've all seen Captain America: Civil War, it's about time to open up the #TeamIronMan v #TeamCap debate. On the one hand, you have Iron Man as a guilt-addled pragmatist who feels UN/international oversight is a nece...


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