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adaptation

Alternate Arrival aliens photo
Alternate Arrival aliens

Check out these alternate alien concept art designs for Denis Villeneuve's Arrival


Other forms of otherworldly
Dec 02
// Hubert Vigilla
We haven't reviewed or written anything on Denis Villeneuve's Arrival on this site, though that definitely needs to change. Arrival is one of the best movies of 2016, and may be the science fiction film that best embodies the...
Rampage adaptation photo
Rampage adaptation

Director of Rampage adapation starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson promises emotion, scares


Kaiju candy asses gonna freak out
Dec 02
// Hubert Vigilla
In case you forgot (why would you remember?), an adaptation of Rampage has been in the works for years. The film seems to have some actual legs on it now that Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson is attached to star with San Andreas dir...
Detective Pikachu photo
Detective Pikachu

Detective Pikachu movie catches a director


Still holding out hope for Danny Devito
Dec 01
// Nick Valdez
After a secret, yet massive bidding war, Legendary won the rights to produce a Pokemon related film. So they began moving forward with an adaptation of Great Detective Pikachu, a CG/live-action hybrid where a talking Pikachu ...

Watch the first trailer for Martin Scorsese's long-awaited Silence

Nov 28 // Hubert Vigilla
Silence comes so late in 2016 that it didn't have a chance to premiere at any of the usual year-end film festivals (i.e., Toronto, New York, Telluride, AFI Fest). Instead, Silence will have its world premiere at The Vatican tomorrow, Tuesday, November 29th. No word on if Pope Francis will be at the screening of the 159-minute film. There is also no word on what designer brand the Pope will be wearing to the world premiere if His Holiness is present. Here's a synopsis for Silence: Martin Scorsese’s SILENCE tells the story of two Christian missionaries (Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver) who face the ultimate test of faith when they travel to Japan in search of their missing mentor (Liam Neeson) – at a time when Christianity was outlawed and their presence forbidden. The celebrated director's 28-year journey to bring Shusaku Endo’s 1966 acclaimed novel to life will be in theaters this Christmas. Silence will be in theaters December 23rd. A poster for the film is included below. [via /Film]
Martin Scorsese's Silence photo
Almost 27 years in the making
Martin Scorsese has had his eyes on Silence since 1990. We first reported on Silence way back in 2011. Had the movie been made sooner, the cast might have included Daniel Day Lewis, Benicio Del Toro, and Gael Garcia Bernal. I...


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Justice League Dark, the animated, R-rated feature has a trailer


Nov 16
// Rick Lash
So the dirty is this: another straight to DVD market animated film from Warner Brothers DC Universe, following the success of Batman: The Killing Joke is ready for release and there's a brand new trailer to tell you about it....

Review: Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk

Nov 14 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]221033:43193:0[/embed] Billy Lynn's Long Halftime WalkDirector: Ang LeeRating: RRelease Date: November 11, 2017 You may recall complaints about The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey being shown in HFR 3D. Audiences said it looked strange and artificial, which is why neither of the two sequels had HFR screenings. That was just at 48 frames per second. With Billy Lynn, more frames per second doesn't translate into greater verisimilitude. Instead the high frame rate tends to make the movie look amateurish and fake. This is experimental technology, and only two theaters in the United States are equipped with the projectors to properly show the HFR version of Billy Lynn. The full experience is underwhelming on the whole with a few exceptions. What does HFR look like? Picture an HD cooking show shot with a consumer-grade digital video camera. Or maybe a local news broadcast viewed on an LCD viewfinder. Movements tend to look overly smooth. In some shots, the figures in the foreground look like they were inserted via green screen. In an early graveyard scene, it felt as if Lee was laying Colorform decals of his actors onto a flat background. 3D never looked so artificial. Other scenes felt like HD versions of cut scenes from 90s video games. I was reminded how expensive things can often be so tacky. It doesn't help that the cinematography lacks life. The film is built out of mechanical, workmanlike medium shots, flat close-ups, and pristine tracking shots. Lee continually returns to the POV of Billy Lynn (Joe Alwyn), like a riff on the symmetrical POV dialogue scenes in an Ozu film. There's a problem. Since Billy's eyeline is not trained at the viewer like the people he's speaking to, the Ozu effect is lost from inconsistency. It's one of many curious choices with the overall way the film was shot. The movie doesn't look clinical but synthetic. In terms of camera placement and movement, the movie almost feels as if it was shot by a first-time cinematographer. In fact, the film was lensed by John Toll, whose credits include The Thin Red Line, Almost Famous, and Cloud Atlas. High frame rates may make amateurs of pros. Occasionally the HFR works well. When Bravo Company takes the field before the game starts and throws some footballs around, the vast length of the field is captured thanks to depth of the tableau. But it's also a tech-demo shot ("Let me show you what this baby can really do!"). The battle scene and halftime show--the sole justification for the technology--are pretty spectacular as well, though more the Iraq scenes than the halftime show. At the Dallas Cowboys game, the troops are meant to share the stage with Destiny's Child. Destiny's Child body doubles, to be more precise. Just when the halftime show seemed like something real, the blatant fake-Beyonce took me right out of the scene. So much of Billy Lynn is about small character moments rather than big spectacle, which makes the decision for HFR filmmaking somewhat baffling. Billy flirts with a cheerleader (Makenzie Leigh) after a press conference. It's a medium shot with a dark curtain as the background. The distracting look of the frame rate and the lack of 3D depth in the shot called attention to the artifice of the scene and the superfluous use of this technology to tell this story. It would be a bad shot and a poorly blocked scene in 2D, but in glorious 4K 3D the banality of the shot is much more apparent. I've spent all of this time complaining about the look of the film that I haven't even gotten to the scenes that work. That ought to say something. Lee's got a good lead in Alwyn, who carries the imperfect movie on his back. He has the all-American look coupled with vulnerable eyes. He's a kid always at the verge of breaking, trying to tamp down the unspeakable hurts. Vin Diesel is the late philosopher warrior of Bravo Company, essentially playing Vin Diesel. Kristen Stewart makes a solid impression in her brief supporting role as Billy's anti-war sister Kathryn. A tense Lynn family dinner scene feels more real than the stadium stuff. Garrett Hedlund makes the most of his screen time as the driven head of Bravo Company, a strong center that orients the group. All of the boys in Bravo have an easy camaraderie, though some of it's built on the same old war movie cliches. This may be just a roundabout way of saying the real immersive material in a movie has nothing to do with 3D or frame rates or spectacle and everything to do with the emotional content. I think about an alternate universe in which Billy Lynn was shot in the same way as The Ice Storm or Brokeback Mountain (and with no fake-Beyonce). I wonder how much more moved I would have been. I wonder what kind of movie this would be. As it is, there's a good movie in Billy Lynn that's constantly struggling to break out and breathe. Witness in 120 frames per second and 4K 3D the folly of mismatched form and content. It's ironic yet fitting that Billy Lynn's technology gets in the way of what works in the film. This is a movie about people using troops as a means to an end--they're good for ratings, they're good as a recruitment tool, they put butts in seats, they're fantasy figures, they can angle for a movie deal (a cloying, winky, meta element to the film that's too on the nose). It's also a movie about disregarding our troops as people. Lee had good intentions, but is feels like the tragedy of these heroes is just an excuse to play with some new cinematic toys.
Review: Billy Lynn's photo
High frame rate, low level execution
I can say this about Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk: Ang Lee and his cast have their hearts in the right place. Adapted from Ben Fountain's novel of the same name, the film is constantly trying to remind its viewers about th...

Ghost in the Shell photo
Major-ly cool
Ghost in the Shell is shaping up to be an interesting project. An adaptation of Mamamune Shirow's manga, Ghost in the Shell stars Scarlett Johansson as Major Motoko Kusanagi, a cyborg policewoman who must help stop the latest...

Review: Elle

Nov 10 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220908:43150:0[/embed] ElleDirector: Paul VerhoevenRating: RRelease Date: November 11, 2016 (limited)Country: France  Elle starts with the rape, in media res. Verhoeven shoots the scene with surprising restraint. There's the noise of the assault off camera. Michèle's pet cat looks on blankly. The rapist, dressed in black with a ski mask, stands and wipes blood from his hip and groin and then walks away. Michèle tidies up around the kitchen and continues about her day in a daze. She's in shock, but it's subtle. A brief bubble bath scene is so artfully done and haunting. Michèle's a bit angrier at her son Vincent (Jonas Bloquet) when he comes to visit than she would be otherwise. Vincent asks about the bruise on the side of her face. She says she fell off her bike. The rape goes unreported. When Michèle finally mentions it to anyone, she waits for the most awkward moment possible to bring it up. She says what happened as if she lost a credit card. Is it a coping mechanism or is it just the movie playing provocateur? Elle aims for the uncomfortable laugh, and for a while it succeeds in doling out its cringe humor. At a certain point, it's just cringes. While dealing with horrible things in life, one hundred other genres may be occurring in the world simultaneously. A portion of the film plays like a thriller, with Michèle narrowing down the suspects in her life while her attacker stalks and harasses her. As this thriller plays out, there's a family dramedy: Michèle's jealous about her ex-husband's new girlfriend, annoyed by her son's screwed up relationship with his pregnant girlfriend, and can't stand her mother's new boyfriend either. Then there's the matter of her father and an infamous trauma in her past, one essential to Michèle's character but never explored substantively in the story. Huppert's a saving grace for the film in that she plays everything so straight, even Michèle's unexpected actions and reactions. Yet these are just actions in a performance, not necessarily actions stemming from a character. I could rarely get a handle on who Michèle was or how she interpreted the world and the events around her. The rape is replayed explicitly in the film, and then played again as a kind of revenge fantasy. Later, Michèle seems to invite victimization. There's a harrowing scene in which Michèle seems turned on by the idea of the man she's with raping her, recreating the trauma that opened the film. Is she feeling pleasure? Is that pain and masochistic shame? Is it a mix of both, and if so, what then? Huppert wears an inscrutable mask before, during, and after the scene. The moment is never discussed afterward. I don't need on-screen psychoanalysis or to be handheld through a narrative, but I'd like to be given some hint of what Michèle feels about what's happened. Elle avoids exploring the emotional impact of rape. Instead the film tries to offer Michèle's detachment as some opaque and oblique portrait of her psychology, but even this amounts to a blank gray page. This is all extremely difficult and sensitive territory to explore, especially when Michèle's motives are so ambiguous. Sure, there's never a single correct way for someone to respond to trauma, but rather than provide an alternative portrait of recovery or greater insight into this personality in flux, I felt as if Elle was simply pushing buttons and inverting the traditional rape-revenge narrative for the shock value. That's easier and less painful than really getting into someone's interior life after such a traumatic experience. The film's MO seems to be keep the focus on the inscrutable surface, and make it shocking. It doesn't help that Elle's perspective is male dominated; it's directed by Verhoeven from a script by David Birke, and adapted from a novel by Philippe Dijan. Am I watching a woman's experience as she struggles to retake power as all the men in her life rob her of agency? Or am I just watching a male interpretation of all this that indulges in a little bit of rape fantasy? This might all be up for audience interpretation, which makes me surprised that so many critics have written that the film is so empowering to women and makes bold statements. I don't think it says anything at all, or intends to empower anyone; it's just well-orchestrated provocation. No surprise that by the end of Elle, I was left feeling a sour and empty frustration. Michèle is the head of a video game company, though this portion of Elle serves as a mild subtextual and metatextual backdrop. They're making a medieval action-adventure--think Warcraft by way of Assassin's Creed with really antiquated graphics. During a meeting, one of her designers--a man who may be the rapist--says that Michèle's pretentious literary background has gotten in the way of the game's basic playability. I think Verhoeven's penchant for provocation might have gotten in the way of the fundamental human concerns of Elle.
Review: Elle photo
Provocative, but is it saying anything?
Elle has been billed as a rape-comedy, but that's a misnomer. It's a comedy in the classical sense given the events of the story, but it's not necessarily funny (there are funny scenes, though). And yes, it's about rape. Elle...

YJ S3 photo
YJ S3

Young Justice returning for a third season


Nov 08
// Nick Valdez
For what is truly a victory for fans after years of online support, WB Animation has confirmed that Young Justice is indeed returning for a season three. The series ran from 2010-2013, as part of Cartoon Network's DC Nation b...
Voltron Live-Action photo
Voltron Live-Action

Universal working on live-action Voltron film


(still)
Nov 05
// Nick Valdez
Studios have wanted a live-action Voltron reboot for some time. Before being bought by Universal, Dreamworks Animation had been chugging away at a script for years. But now after their mild success from the Netflix show, Volt...
LEGO Batman Movie photo
LEGO Batman Movie

Newest LEGO Batman Movie trailer is full of heart and clown snakes


Best bat yet, really
Nov 05
// Nick Valdez
The LEGO Movie was a revelation when it hit theaters two years ago. A fun film with a hearty message, it featured a breakout performance from Will Arnett's Batman. Now with a spin-off set in motion, we haven't heard much of t...
Power Rangers photo
Power Rangers

The Power Rangers reboot Megazord is a f**king mess


ugh
Nov 05
// Nick Valdez
The upcoming Power Rangers reboot may be releasing in five months, but we've only been shown one tiny teaser for it. When pressed about new footage at the NYCC panel, director Dean Isrealite stated they were saving a lot of t...

Review: Pokemon: The First Movie

Nov 03 // Nick Valdez
[embed]221011:43182:0[/embed] Pokemon: The First MovieDirectors: Kunihiko Yuyama and Michael HaigneyRating: GRelease Date: November 6, 1999 (USA); November 1, 2016 (special event re-release) When a group of scientists sucessfully clone an ancient pokemon known as Mew, the resulting super pokemon breaks loose and wreaks havoc. The super clone, Mewtwo (Philip Bartlett), now in search of a purpose, invites the strongest pokemon trainers to a mysterious island to battle him. Ash Ketchum (Veronica Taylor), together with his friends Misty (Rachael Lillis), Brock (Eric Stuart), and Pikachu, meet Mewtwo's challenge and soon figure out there's more to this pokemon than they realized.  First things first, The First Movie is incredibly brisk. Choosing not to overstay its welcome (if you don't include the Pikachu's Island Adventure short), it instead tightly focuses on developing its central antagonist. Mewtwo themself is well defined with a clear existential crisis (as they try to clear the clouds of their mind, not so subtly represented by the storm they whip up with their powers), and it's a greater deal of characterization than anyone else gets in the film. It's such a well put together back story, in fact, it's surprising The First Movie is able to explore as much thematic territory as it does. It ends up questioning the philosophy behind the Pokémon series in full as it briefly challenges the "fighting vs. battling" argument within the Poké world. The film doesn't get as deep as I would've hoped, as the argument gives way to a hokey climax, but this amount of self-awareness is impressive for a children's film.  The laser focus on Mewtwo may help the film's pace within its short run time (as it rarely goes on tangents), but it's hard to care about anyone else involved with the plot since they fail to get the same attention. Since the film assumes the audience has working knowledge of the Pokémon TV series, and it's a fair assumption given the branding, Ash and his friends (along with Team Rocket, introduced into the plot in a Rosencrantz/Gildenstern, outsider looking in fashion) don't really have a reason to be involved. Their usual schtick of wandering into a plot in motion may work for a TV series needing a fresh story every week, but it falls flat here. Along with introducing seemingly important ancillary characters (like the kidnapped Nurse Joy or the random lady who knows storms or something) only to serve no purpose, The First Movie fails to turn Ash into a compelling protagonist.  With no real personality of his own, Ash instead becomes a moral mouthpiece. His base love for his pokemon is exaggerated into a love for everything and grand declarations of peace. It's a far cry from an Ash who, just minutes before, was willing to pit his pokemon against Mewtwo. The First Movie betrays its emotional themes with its own world, really. It's greater desire to stop senseless violence goes against everything Pokémon is known for. So it's okay to use your pokemon to fight when they use their abilities? Since there's never a clear difference between how Mewtwo forces a fight and how trainers could force a fight, the overall moral is clouded. Rather than focus on, say, the friendship between trainers and their pokes (thus enhancing its narrative overall), the film goes with a generic message. It almost feels like a cop out.  But in the end, Pokémon: The First Movie makes up for its shortcomings with pure entertainment value. Once you get passed the cheesy dialogue (complete with puns and jokes that didn't age well in the slightest) and the murky themes (which I give the film credit for attempting), there are plenty of rewards in store. A well written antagonist, slick animation, and a score that includes the ironically lovable "Brother Against Brother" song.  No matter what score I put here, it literally doesn't matter. You love it, you hate it, you already had an opinion 18 years in the making. But it was great to confirm that I liked a good thing back then, instead of figuring out yet another product from my childhood was hot garbage. My critic brain may settle on "Good," but my nostalgic one adds about 30 points. 
Pokemon The First Movie photo
"...and we succeeded"
One weekend, too many years ago, I spent a night over at my aunt's place. She didn't have cable, but she had a VCR. Which meant I could watch any movie I brought with me when I was bored of doing dumb kid stuff. Not thinking ...

Uncharted film adaptation photo
Uncharted film adaptation

Shawn Levy will direct the Uncharted film adaptation


Ben Stiller as Nathan Drake?
Oct 26
// Hubert Vigilla
It looks like that Uncharted adaptation is moving forward again. Sony has tapped Shawn Levy (Night at the Museum, Real Steel) to direct the film from a script by Joe Carnahan (The Grey). Carnahan was at one time attached to d...

NYCC: Power Rangers might be both fun and boring

Oct 11 // Nick Valdez
First thing's first, we did get a few key bits of info that my fan brain was able to parse out. One thing the cast seemed to emphasize at the panel was the fact they had to do a lot of stunt work themselves, which is great (and what I wanted all along). RJ Cyler (Billy) had a pretty fun anecdote about how he learned how to do an "axe kick" from his stuntman. So this at least confirms that we'll be seeing them fight outside of suits, but if the trailer is anything to go by, these fights are most likely mixes of martial arts and superpowers. As for the Zords, we still didn't get a look at them as it seemed that the teaser trailer was really all that was ready to show off for now. It's a little lame but I get not wanting to release it all early.  My biggest concern going forward, however, is how well this cast will work together. At the panel they were telling stories of how much they bonded as a group, but their behavior told a different story. They seemed stiff around each other with no natural chemistry. In fact, the only ones happy to be there were the previously mentioned RJ Cyler and Becky G (Trini), who not only color coordinated their outfits but also are the only experienced actors in the teenage cast. It didn't help matters when the host clearly didn't understand what was going on, so there was no push for more stories of their time on set together. The last bit of new info is both director Dean Isrealite and Elizabeth Banks mentioned Goldar and the Putty Patrol. Not a hard confirmation, but it's good to know these characters will be back in some regard.  But since they thought the teaser was good enough to show twice, I might as well breakdown some things here. As I mentioned in that post, I'm a little torn. After spending some time away from it and the fan bubble, I've come to realize a few things. I'm not sure what I expected, but I totally forgot Lionsgate is the reason Young Adult books made so much money. The Hunger Games, Twilight, they all play a part here. While the opening logos promise a rainbow colored adventure (even spilling out into the first shot of the trailer with Jason and his red car,  and yellow, pink and blue bikes), the rest of the film gives way to the same grim color palette the rest of the Young Adult films have. But in a weird way, this totally works when stuff like the power coins are highlighted. While the overly dark lighting might get tiresome, maybe the colors will pop more. Sort of a silver lining situation. But that's pretty much where the positives end. I'm thinking this reboot, an origin story as the trailer confirms, is going to be both fun and boring. As evidenced by the Breakfast Club like setup (where a bunch of latchkey kids come together in detention, including a red ranger wearing a house arrest anklet), these kids are meeting other for the first time before bonding over becoming superheroes. While I don't like their Spider-Man esque powers (complete with the Tobey Macguire "look I have abs now" scene), I get it. Power Rangers has always been about regular people who get caught up in irregularity, and it's been done in the series proper, but this direction only works when the characters are defined well. If you remember, it took the original show sixteen episodes of team building before it could tell an actual story ("Green With Evil"). I'm also guessing that's why we've seen so little of the Ranger action as of yet. Which is a shame since that's what is going to separate the movie from all the other boring teen films.  The most grim prediction I can make regarding this tease is that we're only going to get about 15-20 minutes of them in the actual suits. At least the panel confirmed that the suits are physical (with CG enhancements, most likely), but I'm sure most of this origin is going to be spent getting to know these kids since the film doesn't have the luxury of getting 22 mins of air time every weekend. At least it looks like they'll free Rita when they nab the power coins. Since there's an image of her trapped in some kind of rock, I'm assuming it's the same the rock Billy blows up in the trailer. It'd be neat to connect Rita directly to the Rangers that way.  Overall, I am a bit disappointed with the way the NYCC panel went down. Once I took off my fan hat, and put on my critical one however, I did ease up. But not by much. As always, I remain highly skeptical. I don't like some of the changes to the story, but I do like some of the changes it brings (the fact Rita can say "kill" instead of "destroy" is a huger deal than we're making out of it). And it seems the trailer is doing a lot to grab non-fans of the series, which is always a huge plus. I just don't want to watch a series of movies I dislike, so I hope these can be good. Then again, since this could have been much worse I'll take what I can get.  Oh yeah, don't expect the Green Ranger anytime soon. 
Power Rangers NYCC photo
Goldar and the Puttys are a comin'
There was only one panel I was looking forward to during New York Comic this year, and it's been a long wait for it. On Saturday, Lionsgate held a dual panel featuring both Power Rangers and John Wick: Chapter Two. Suffice to...

Power Rangers photo
After 10,000 years...
So it's a bit earlier than planned and it's definitely taken the wind out of my sails in more ways than one. But here's the first Power Rangers reboot trailer. I'm not sure what to think. At first watch, it's pretty generic b...

Fantastic Beasts photo

Now that Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is a little over a month away expect to see more and more of it leading into its November release. When you see the trailer, these are probably your immediate thoughts: 1. "Fan...

Fruit Ninja photo
Fruit Ninja

New Line Cinema will release Fruit Ninja film, first plot details revealed


Drain your brain batteries
Sep 25
// Hubert Vigilla
As we previously reported, there is a film adaptation of Fruit Ninja in the works because money. The film rights have been picked up by New Line Cinema because produce and money, too. In the brief Hollywood Reporter piece on ...
Morgan Spurlock's Rats photo
Morgan Spurlock's Rats

Trailer: Morgan Spurlock's new documentary Rats looks like an intense horror thriller


Vermin, vermin everywhere *vomits*
Sep 16
// Hubert Vigilla
Rats are the worst. Like, seriously guys, the worst. There's this vacant building next to my apartment that's rife with them and the city seems helpless about controlling the problem. We may disagree about a lot of things, bu...
Fifty Shades Darker photo
Fifty Shades Darker

Here's the darker trailer for Fifty Shades Darker


Fifty Shades Danker
Sep 15
// Nick Valdez
I read the trilogy, I reviewed the original film, and now I'm here to tell you about Fifty Shades Darker. There's honestly not much to say about it. It has the same look as the first one, has the same lack of chemistry its tw...
Assassin's Creed images photo
Assassin's Creed images

Michael Fassbender is like "Come at me, bro!" in these new Assassin's Creed images


Do you even leap of faith, brah?
Sep 13
// Hubert Vigilla
The end of the year is fast approaching, which means that the Assassin's Creed movie is almost upon us. While the people over at Ubisoft seemed to downplay box office expectations, this film may turn a pretty decent profit li...
Chris Benoit biopic photo
Chris Benoit biopic

Lexi Alexander will direct Crossface, a biopic on infamous WWE wrestler Chris Benoit


Wrestling with a painful tragedy
Sep 13
// Hubert Vigilla
Back in late 2011 we mentioned that a Chris Benoit biopic was in the works called Crossface. Benoit, as you may recall, was the professional wrestler for WCW and WWE who murdered his wife and son and took his own life in 2007...
Black Lightning photo
Black Lightning

DC's Black Lightning coming to TV, but not on The CW


Sep 09
// Nick Valdez
As we've reiterated many times in the past, what WB/DC can't seem to do in their films they've been excelling at on TV. One major player has been producer Greg Berlanti, who pretty much reinvented DC on TV with Arrow, The Fla...
Live By Trailer photo
Live By Trailer

Trailer for Ben Affleck's Live By Night tears through the prohibition era


Sep 09
// Nick Valdez
Ben Affleck's currently in a sort of revival. He may have take some hits in the 2000s, but it all changed in the 2010s with The Town. With a trio of successful directorial outings (Gone Baby Gone, The Town, and Argo), he's we...
Elle trailer photo
Elle trailer

Paul Verhoeven is back with Elle starring Isabelle Huppert, watch the trailer


An empowering, lighthearted rape movie?
Sep 06
// Hubert Vigilla
Though Showgirls eventually achieved camp/cult status, it was a major strike against Paul Verhoeven's career. He couldn't find steady footing in Hollywood afterwards, Starship Troopers notwithstanding. Showgirls also torpedoe...
Willy Wonka 35mm photo
Willy Wonka 35mm

NYC: Metrograph showing Willy Wonka in 35mm Labor Day weekend


Young lovers love the spring
Sep 02
// Hubert Vigilla
If you live in New York City and can't get into the AMC screenings of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory this weekend, you may still get to see the movie on the big screen in the next few days. Metrograph (one of my favori...
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Warner Bros. rumored to adapt Harry Potter and the Cursed Child into a film trilogy


Harry Potter and the Unnecessary Trilogy
Sep 01
// Geoff Henao
Warner Bros. sure loves its film franchises doesn't it? After all, when you own the rights to some of the largest film properties, it only makes sense that they'd want to milk that cash cow for as long as possible. After Harr...
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HBO's Westworld gets a new trailer


Aug 31
// Rick Lash
Perhaps you've been feeling the fantasy blues on HBO of late. Game of Thrones been off the air for over two full months. True Blood for over two years. Maybe you've been hankering for some HBO-flavored western, and gosh darni...
Warcraft sequel photo
Warcraft sequel

Duncan Jones would still like to make Warcraft 2, comments on director's cut of first film


"Maybe I'm just being a masochist."
Aug 31
// Hubert Vigilla
Warcraft had a rough go critically but was able to make money thanks to the foreign box office (particularly China). While a sequel seems unlikely, director Duncan Jones is still game to make the movie given all of the time a...
Sam Mendes photo
Sam Mendes

Sam Mendes possibly tapped for live action James and the Giant Peach


Next up in Disney's live action crusade
Aug 26
// Matthew Razak
As we all know Disney is on a relentless quest to turn their animation adaptation into live action movies. And considering that the likes of Maleficient, The Jungle Book and Cinderella all did gangbusters it makes s...

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