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adaptation

The new Lara Croft photo
Another Oscar winner as Lara Croft
Alicia Vikander has been cast as the new Lara Croft for the Tomb Raider reboot, which starts a fine tradition of casting Academy Award winners in the role. Angelina Jolie won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Girl, Interrup...

Review: The Family Fang

Apr 28 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220426:42899:0[/embed] The Family FangDirector: Jason BatemanRating: RRelease Date: April 29, 2016 (limited); May 6, 2016 (wide, VOD) Caleb and Camille Fang are a pair of performance artists who used their two children to stage happenings around town. In the opening scene, the Fangs enter a bank, stage a lollipop robbery, and then have a shootout. The fake blood is sweet. It's an absurd flashback as seen through an Instagram filter, but it offers and idea of the Fang family's artistic MO, which is the MO of most performance art: to disrupt the regular flow of life, to make others pay attention, to cause a scene, which itself is a singular artistic act. Decades later, Annie Fang (Nicole Kidman) is a dysfunctional actress while her brother Buster (Jason Bateman, who also directed the film) is a dysfunctional writer. He suffers a potato gun injury while out on assignment, which makes the dysfunctional Fang parents (Christopher Walken and Maryann Plunkett) offer to drive their son home. The children want to live their adult lives, the parents want to force their children to make disruptive art. Dysfunction ensues. After a nasty fight, Caleb and Camille leave their children. Their car is found on the side of the road with evidence of a violent abduction, which leaves Annie and Buster wondering if this is just another art-prank of if their parents are really in danger. There's so much possibility with set-up and the cast, so perhaps the ultimate disappointment is that The Family Fang feels so toothless. I haven't read the Kevin Wilson's acclaimed novel the film is based on, but I suspect there's something lost between text and screen. Every now and then, Bateman cuts to a documentary about the Fang parents and the art they created. They're important cult figures in the art world (think Chris Burden and Marina Abramovic), yet they've failed to create anything meaningful since their children left home. What's more, their art has an ugly domineering aspect to it, and they're oblivious to the ways they've hurt their children in selfish pursuit of their own interests. Art has consequences, and I sense that kind of conversation is easier to explore in text rather than on film. Debate can be carried on in every line and with periodic asides, yet in the film version of The Family Fang, that idea seems to be explored only out of obligation to the theme rather than full interest. There's also a tidiness to The Family Fang that's disappointingly pat. This is a story about people who are hurt and who hurt others because of it (themselves, most often), yet David Lindsay-Abaire's screenplay keeps the edges of the characters clean rather than jagged and more complicated. The mystery element is compelling enough to follow the story to its end, but the film never fully inhabits moments that should be more painful and honest. Consequently there's no catharsis or emotional release even though there are gestures made at both. If unhappy families are supposed to be unhappy in their own way, it's because of how richly the characters are rendered. In The Family Fang, I still felt like these were character types in a dysfunctional family movie rather than actual people dealing with a dysfunctional upbringing. The Fang MO is to make others wake up, yet the Fangs themselves emotionally sleepwalk through this trying time in their lives. Which is a shame since Kidman seems engaged yet relaxed in her character, enough that her accent occasionally slips--I can accept that as an Annie Fang artistic affectation. Walken is also good as Caleb Fang, though he never gets a chance to really let go. Ditto Plunkett, who's underused Camille Fang hints at a much deeper internal life than what shows up on screen. The same is true of Buster, the deadpan screw-up writer (all screw-up writers are alike, by the way). You sense that the Fang family members are each on the verge of some breakthrough, but, like the film, it never comes in a satisfying way.
Review: The Family Fang photo
The aesthetics of family dysfunction
All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way... well, unless you're an unhappy family in a movie, in which case you're pretty much alike. Distant/absent parents. A dictatorial patriarch. A stran...

Tribeca Review: High-Rise

Apr 25 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220425:42900:0[/embed] High-RiseDirector: Ben WheatleyRating: RRelease Date: March 18, 2016 (UK); May 13, 2016 (USA)Country: UK Laing (Tom Hiddleston) is a brain surgeon who's taken a flat in a new luxury high rise. In the apartment above there's Charlotte (Sienna Miller), a flirty socialite who makes eyes with the good doctor as he sunbathes nude on his balcony. Building designer Anthony Royal (Jeremy Irons) lives in the penthouse, where his wife rides white horses on the rooftop garden and he looks down on his grand social experiment: all the comforts one could need, a hermetic society. And yet the parties and the supermarket and the pool access is never enough to keep people compliant. They isolate themselves, they become tribal. The opening of the film, which looks downright post-apocalyptic, shows how far the high rise life has decayed. Laing scavenges the dumpsite foyer of his building for food, dressed in the tatters of a business suit. He's gone from doctor to concrete pirate. There's no food, but thank goodness for stray dogs. Like the upper-middle-class residents of the skyscraper, I'm not sure director Ben Wheatley and writer Amy Jump get what they want out of High-Rise; the same may go for the audience. Adapted from the J.G. Ballard novel of the same name, it's a sordid and decadent movie about people going native in their own crowded living quarters, but it's even looser and sloppier than that. As society crumbles, the narrative structure of the film breaks down as well. The last half of the movie eschews traditional narrative and tells the rest of the building's decay in a series of loud vignettes and montages. I can pinpoint the exact moment midway through High-Rise where I lost a lot of my patience. Before a raging bastard of a man named Richard Wilder (Luke Evans) goes on a dominating rampage, he tapes his own voice in a cassette recorder. He repeats "I am Richard Wilder!" On the one hand, I get it (Wild, yes, and you're wilder than others, like this is the wild, okay), but on the other hand I rolled my eyes because I couldn't have not gotten it already (yeah, Dick wilder, I noticed). The scene that follows it is ugly and uncomfortable; obviously by design, and yet. High-Rise isn't bad so much as it's convoluted in its execution and maybe wishy-washy with its cultural critique. There's something Gilliam-esque about some of the scenes. The aristocratic party in 18th century garb is a nice bit of upper class affectation, and ditto the block party out in the hall. Similarly, the growing squalor of the building looks like something out of Brazil combined with a third-world landfill. The lights flicker out periodically, and nothing quite works the way it should in this place, and yet one carries on. Laing is no Sam Lowry from Brazil, however. Like some of the characters in High-Rise, Laing is passive and content to sit back as the world around him devolves and crumbles, which sort of squanders Hiddleston's natural charisma. He exists as a metaphor, a symbol, not a person. Meanwhile, others act or are acted upon; most of them also metaphors or symbols rather than people. It's the difference between facades and actual domiciles. There's a clinical lens about High-Rise, which makes sense since the breakdown is about observing the devaluation of others. It's like watching a crowded cage full of rats who are bound, at some point, to destroy each other just given the crowding and the lack of resources. And yet it's not quite like that since our ability to observe this cannibalization is interrupted. The sense of cause-and-effect is broken up, it feels like there's something missing. The vignettes that comprise the final half of High-Rise become frustrating since we're rarely offered a chance to explore the emerging tribes of the building. Here are tribal cultures and subcultures organizing themselves inside of a multi-tiered concrete petri dish (e.g., a matriarchal society of women and orphaned children), and we barely get an opportunity to observe their method of survival. MILD SPOILERS ABOUT THE FINAL SCENE The final words of the film don't belong to any of the characters we've spent time with. Instead it's the voice of Margaret Thatcher extolling the virtues of capitalism. Nevermind that there's little in the movie about capitalism per se. Maybe this is Thatcher suggesting capitalism as a solution to the egalitarian nightmare whose failure we just watched? And given our place in time, maybe the state of nature isn't quite as bad as the current state of government-approved inequality. High-Rise is a work of interesting and extreme architecture, but I'm still not sure what to make of its design.
Review: High Rise photo
Going native in a concrete jungle
High-Rise is a bit all over the place, and it's a bit of a mess, but it also seems to be that way by design--a sort of warped architecture. I'd gone in sort of expecting a vertical version of Bong Joon-Ho's Snowpiercer, but i...

Review: A Hologram for the King

Apr 21 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]220438:42905:0[/embed] A Hologram for the KingDirector: Tom TykwerRating: RRelease Date: April 22, 2016 And you may ask yourself,"How can they make movie trailers that awful?"And you may ask yourself,"Is this portrayal of Saudi Arabian culture problematic or simply the use of a foreign land as a pretext for self-discovery (i.e. Japan in Lost in Translation [which, come to think of it, may be inherently problematic])?"And you may tell yourself,"This is a lot like the plot in a Cameron Crowe movie (i.e., a lost man needs the love a good woman to show him the way)."And you may tell yourself,"The first half of the movie is quirky, likable enough, and not so bad." Letting the days go byAlan Clay (Hanks) is waiting for the Saudi KingLetting the days go byThe king seems like he'll never show up in a vast, unmade desert megalopolisDriving around againAlan's showing the king holographic teleconferencing technology"Once in a Lifetime"Is a recurring motif that's introduced and dropped after two scenes Same as it ever was... Same as it ever was... (Alan thinks again and again about working for Schwinn, his gig before this IT job. He downsized the bike company and outsourced factory jobs to China. This mix of jetlag and class guilt causes him to wake up later and later each day, requiring the services of a private driver named Yousef played by Alexander Black to shuttle him from his hotel to the unmade desert megalopolis. Black is at once a guide through Saudi Arabian life and yet also a kind of silly and maybe even condescending caricature of the Saudi working class who loves prog rock and American AM radio hits. This may be unavoidable given the western outsider perspective that the story takes, and it allows someone to play sidekick to the archetypal good-old-fashioned American that Hanks excels at portraying at this point of his career. But yeah, problematic. It's as if all people and all things are tools to be used by this visiting outsider, each thing he encounters a potential mid-life crisis lesson rather than a thing unto itself. A consequence of globalization: American mid-life crises take hold anywhere around the world the narrative chooses.) A cyst forms on Alan's back, and the cyst needs to be removedThe cyst is a metaphor for the sadness/guilt of the American upper middle classAlan finds solace in a place he'd never intended to travel toHe might find home by leaving the place he's lived in all his life Letting the pat life lessons go byOne involves a camping trip with Alan's dadLetting the expedient romance go byDr. Zahara played by Sarita Choudhury is an interesting and nuanced character, though a utilitarian love interestDriving around againShe's struggling with culture and modernityOnce in a lifetimeIf only the middle-age romance that develops wasn't so trite and treacly And you may ask yourself,"Would I watch this on cable if it was free?" (Maybe just the first half, but maybe not)And you may ask yourself,"Could more have been done with the quirkiness at the start?" (This definitely doesn't feel like a Tykwer movie in general, it's a bit staid)And you may ask yourself,"Should I have gone to a different screening this morning instead?"And you may say to yourself,"My God!...What have I done?!" Letting the days go byUnresolved subplots keep pulling the movie downLetting the days go byHanks sustains the lulls with his affability, but it only goes so farInto the blue againYousef's car is colored blueUnder the quirks and veilsThe movie's just a competent shrug Same as it ever was... Same as it ever was... Same as it ever was...Look where my mind went by the second halfThe interest isn't holding upTime is an asteriskSame as it ever was... Same as it ever was... Same as it ever was... Same as it ever was... Same as it ever was... Same as it ever was... Same as it ever was...Yeah, the gimmick review's overHere comes the review scoreSame as it ever was...
A Hologram for the King photo
Eat, Pray, Love, Sell IT Solutions
And you may find yourself sitting in a press screening for A Hologram for the KingAnd you may find yourself wondering if Tom Hanks can pull off another mid-life crisisAnd you may find yourself wondering if you should have rea...


Power Rangers photo
Power Rangers

Here's the first image of Elizabeth Banks as Rita Repulsa


Green with evil
Apr 19
// Nick Valdez
I've gone back and forth over Lionsgate's upcoming Power Rangers movie too many times to count now. Everyone has specific fandoms they know too much about and one of mine happens to be the Power Rangers. So for the first time...
BioShock Twilight Zone photo
A dimension of sound, sight, and of mind
BioShock director Ken Levine is teaming with Interlude to explore the intersection of gaming and film: his next stop is The Twilight Zone. According to Wired, Levine and Interlude are finalizing their deal to use the tropes a...

Review: The Jungle Book

Apr 15 // Matthew Razak
The Jungle BookDirector: Jon FavreauRated: PGRelease Date: April 15, 2016 [embed]220509:42914:0[/embed] As a property it's hard to believe that one could bring something new to The Jungle Book. Mogli's (Neel Sethi) story has been told so many times in so many different ways that retelling it again seems a bit redundant. This seems especially true since this version is part of Disney's ongoing effort to remake or reimagine their animated classics as live action films (see: Cinderella or Maleficent). Yet despite the fact that this new version of The Jungle Book once again finds Mogli raised by a pack of wolves and the panther Bagheera (Ben Kingsley), hunted by the villainous tiger Shere Khan (Idris Elba) and eventually hanging out with the laid back bear Baloo (Bill Murray), it feels dramatically different from previous tellings of the story. The plot may be mostly the same as Disney's animated classic, but striking visuals and Favreau's surprisingly fluid direction make it an entirely new experience. Those visuals, though. You will spend half this movie wondering what is real and what isn't while marveling at the individual hairs on Baloo's back or how Baheera moves perfectly or how the fat on King Louie (Christopher Walken) is disturbingly realistic. If ever a film has crossed the uncanncy valley it is The Jungle Book. Yes, there are still some parts that get stuck in the low end of that valley, but overall it is a visual masterpiece. The most impressive part is that they did it all while featuring talking animals in situations that are sometimes entirely human. Everything feels real and yet is somehow full of the magic and wonder that more traditional animation brings. It is this combination of reality and magic that make The Jungle Book work so well. Hats off to Favreau for being able to pull this movie together. His direction is often striking and far more than you'd expect from a traditional children's film. Some shots seem to be pulled from an art house independent while others are pitch-perfect horror moments (still suitable for children). Most impressive though is the fluid way he moves Mogli and company through the jungle. Taking advantage of his almost entirely digital setting, Favreau stitches together fluid shots that make you feel like you're there. It helps that the IMAX 3D is simply breathtaking on the big screen and that digital animation always looks better in that setting. Though Favreau may miss a few beats here and there, they're mostly because he's playing towards a crowd of children who expect certain things from their movies.  The only truly inconsistent thing about the movie is Sethi, who, in all fairness, had an incredibly daunting task before him since he's the only actual person in the entire film. It's clear that he became more comfortable with that fact as shooting went on as his performance varies from absolutely stellar (banging out a rendition of "The Bear Necessities") to horribly awkward (being hypnotized by the snake Kaa, played by an utterly wasted Scarlet Johansson). Still, he performs admirably overall, and it's his animal counterparts who steal the show anyway. Murray's Baloo is both perfect casting and the chance to hear him sing Baloo's classic song would make any movie worth the price of admission. Throw in a rollicking scene with King Louie that has Walken delivering a mafia routine and a chilling rendition of "Be Like You" and it's hard not to be drawn in by the performances not to mention stopping your foot from tapping. Much of their performance can be chalked up to the stellar animation, especially Elba's Shere Khan, who lurks around the screen fearsomely while the actor's silky voice drips with menace.   This is a children's movie overall, however. In the end Disney wants kids to be pretending they're hanging out with Baloo, and the movie plays like that. It's almost a contradiction as they hyper-realism of the film means the darker parts have that much more impact and the scary parts are that much scarier. Often the look and tone of the film don't jive with each other, though that's probably only a complaint an adult would have.  That look is so good, however, that it almost doesn't matter if the tone feels off sometimes. This is a major step forward in what we should come to expect from our CGI, but more importantly to that target audience, it's actually fun. 
Jungle Book photo
More than the bear necessities
At this point in my jaded film critic life it takes a lot to actually impress me with special effects. We've seen Transformers and giant blue aliens and everything in between on screen by now, and great digital effects are al...

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Scarlett Johansson contemplates life in first Ghost in the Shell image


Major ScarJo Kusanagi.
Apr 14
// Geoff Henao
Earlier today, Paramount Pictures and DreamWorks Pictures announced that production has officially started for their live-action adaptation of Ghost in the Shell. To commemorate, they have released the first official ima...
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Ben Affleck directing, starring in solo Batman film


No (April) fooling.
Apr 13
// Geoff Henao
It was easy to poke fun at Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice for our April Fool's Day shenanigans this year, given its divisive nature across the internet. While the jokes increased in wackiness as the day went on, it s...
Doctor Strange Trailer photo
"Teach me."
Since we're finally past all of Marvel's big moves like The Avengers and Captain America: Civil War, we're finally entering Marvel's weirder titles. It's also coincidentally the material I know the least about. All I know abo...

TMNT Trailer photo
TMNT Trailer

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows gets a cartoony trailer


Apr 11
// Nick Valdez
I'm much more interested in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows than I thought I'd be. After the first film's poor reception, everyone on board went back to the drawing board and added some stuff fans might like....
Fantastic Beasts Trailer photo
Colin Farrell is a wizard
We're currently in the midst of a new wave of Harry Potter mania. With its Universal Studios park finally opening, J.K Rowling releasing a written version of the newest stage play (which is book eight for all intents and purp...

Suicide Squad Trailer photo
Suicide Squad Trailer

Newest Suicide Squad Trailer is trying its best to be different


Apr 11
// Nick Valdez
Remember the MTV Movie Awards? WB/DC sure hopes you did! Capitalizing on that all so precious 18-24 demographic (and most likely younger given MTV) is the newest trailer for Suicide Squad. It's got a better handle on itself a...
Warcraft posters photo
Warcraft posters

New character posters for the Warcraft movie are shiny at sunset (or sunrise)


It looks all gamey
Apr 08
// Hubert Vigilla
I'm still pretty ambivalent about Duncan Jones' Warcraft. Jones gets goodwill for Moon, obviously, but the various trailers and promos for the film seem a bit flat and bland. Maybe that's just the nature of some trailers in g...
Sean Penn Angry Birds photo
Sean Penn Angry Birds

Sean Penn lends his voice to The Angry Birds Movie


Angry man meets El Chirpo
Apr 07
// Hubert Vigilla
Sean Penn has joined the cast of The Angry Birds Movie. I never thought I'd write that sentence in my life, but here we are. I never thought I'd eat breakfast cereal for dinner either, but my Tuesday evenings can be strange a...
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Ben Affleck-penned Batman film greenlit for production


Who can Matt Damon cameo as?
Apr 01
// Geoff Henao
Everything isn't all rose petals in the DC/Warner Bros. camp right now. Despite Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice amassing over $400 million in its first week, the critical reviews of the film have definitely hurt box office...
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Final Fantasy XV CGI film, anime spin-offs announced


Nothing final about these fantasies.
Mar 31
// Geoff Henao
Last night's "Uncovered: Final Fantasy XV" event was a long time coming for Final Fantasy fans as Square Enix unveiled more information on the next entry in the popular franchise. While some of the information was leaked earl...
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Suicide Squad goes international with latest trailer


Mar 28
// Geoff Henao
Has the dust settled over the Batman v Superman madness, yet? While I personally haven't seen the film yet, I'm already over the entire debacle and ready for this summer's Suicide Squad. Mark my words: I think it'll be more t...
Warcraft trailer photo
Warcraft trailer

New international Warcraft trailer has wizard lightning, that orc baby, and a possible subtitle


Zap! Fzzzzit! Pew! Pew!
Mar 28
// Hubert Vigilla
The marketing machine for Duncan Jones' Warcraft is starting to kick in as we get a little bit closer to the June 10th release date. A trailer released earlier in the month gave us a little glimpse at a dwarf and an orc getti...
Assassin/Splinter sequels photo
Assassin/Splinter sequels

Sequels already being planned for Assassin's Creed and Splinter Cell movies


The search for more money
Mar 25
// Hubert Vigilla
While the two Ubisoft-title movies (Assassin's Creed and Splinter Cell) have yet to be released, there's already talk about making sequels. Because obviously they want to make sequels, and money. According to Variety, the Tai...
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The LEGO Batcave looks LEGO awesome in The LEGO Batman Movie teaser trailer


There are no LEGO batnipples, though.
Mar 24
// Geoff Henao
The LEGO Movie was a pleasant surprise when it came out in 2014, introducing us to a whimsical universe where the Ninja Turtles peacefully co-existed alongside Batman, Shaq, and Lando Calrissian. Given the family-friendly nat...

Who's the best on screen Superman?

Mar 23 // Nick Valdez
Bud Collyer (New Adventures of Superman and several radio specials) Though the only experience I have with Paramount's 1940s serials are the few I found on a budget DVD a few years back, Bud Collyer will most likely go down as the actor with the longest Superman tenure. Starring in those serials as well as over 2000 radio specials from 1940 to 1951, Collyer was the de facto Superman to an entire generation. He also set a lot of guidelines for future Supermen too such as adopting a lower octave when speaking as Superman.  Kirk Alyn (Superman 1948) Collyer might've been the first Superman in media, but Kirk Alyn was the first live action one. His brief stint (only starring in two serials, Superman and Atom Man vs. Superman) isn't well remembered thanks to how badly it's aged, but there's something charming about Alyn's positively charged performance. He took those budgetary and technological limits with a smile.  George Reeves (Superman and the Mole Men) George Reeves began the ever important focus shift to Clark Kent, thus granting Superman more longevity in media. His Superman take wasn't bad, but his Clark Kent made his stint memorable. Bringing a charm and intelligence to the role that wasn't captured yet, writers began focusing more and more on Supes' secret identity life. In fact, Reeves' stint as the hero was more Kent focused than anything.  Danny Dark (Super Friends) Despite all of its cheese, and all of the jokes fans make now, Super Friends was my first introduction to superheroes. Caught it at five in the morning along with Hanna Barbara reruns of Scooby Doo and Johnny Quest. The only unfortunate thing about Superman's role in Super Friends was that it was pretty unremarkable. I remember the Legion of Doom making more of an impact on this show. Super Friends' version of Superman had almost no defining characteristics.  Christopher Reeve (Superman-Superman IV: The Quest for Peace) Then, in 1978, everything changed. Suddenly, superhero fiction seemed like it could work on film. Arguably the most well known and favored actor to take on the role, Christopher Reeve defined Superman for a generation of moviegoers. Combining George Reeves' Clark Kent mannerisms and Kirk Alyn's positivity, Reeve was the first Superman (and only one for a while) that felt absolutely sincere. Also, the man was 6'4 and 225 pounds. Doesn't get more "super" than that.  Tim Daly/George Newbern (Superman: The Animated Series/Justice League) While Super Friends was the first superhero show I've ever watched, Superman: The Animated Series quickly became a new favorite. Before Bruce Timm's unprecedented animation domination (crafting a huge DC comics animated universe), Superman served as the lighter tone alternative to Batman: The Animated Series. Tim Daly and George Newbern essentially deserve the same amount of credit (as Newbern took over once Superman ceased to have a solo series) as both their takes saw Superman through his most faithful comic stories to date. Adaptations of "For the Man Who Haves Everything," "What Ever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?," and introducing long time comic book villains like Brainiac and Darkseid to the mix.  Dean Cain (Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman) Ah, poor Dean Cain. He really never bounced back after this (while his co-star Teri Hatcher did just fine with Desperate Housewives) because while he tried his best to do both Clark Kent and Superman justice, fans didn't quite gel with the show's focus on relationship struggles. There is some surprising nuance to be found with Cain's performance during the first season as Kal-El wants Lois to love him for him and not his powers, but the show later squandered all of that promise. And then equally squandered Dean Cain and doomed him to obscurity. Tom Welling (Smallville) Smallville was a weird, weird series. Its formula serving as the prototype shows like Arrow and The Flash would adopt later, Tom Welling portrayed a young Clark slowly discovering his powers and becoming the Superman we all know and love...except he didn't actually become Superman until the final episode. Full of weird things like the not-Justice League and not-Lex Luthor (who was actually the best Luthor and The Flash WB and DC have ever had), but Welling held it all together. It wasn't a perfect series by any means, but Welling managed to keep our attention for ten seasons. That's pretty super.  Brandon Routh (Superman Returns) I loved, loved Superman Returns. Brandon Routh was absolutely charming (and that charm keeps his TV career alive to this day), but his downfall ultimately was cinema's changing tone overall. Although it paid tribute to Richard Donner's earlier Superman films and Routh captured what made Christopher Reeve's performance so special, fans were over it. The "lack" of superhero action in a post-Batman Begins world was the final nail in the coffin. It was too bright of a film to succeed.  Roger Rose (Batman: The Brave and the Bold) Okay, so my favorite Superman comics were always the ones where Superman acted like a total jerk. Like when red kryptonite turned Superman into a tyrant ruling the Earth, or when Mr. Mxyzptlk makes him act wrongo, or that time he tries to un-adopt Jimmy Olsen by acting like such an asshole that Jimmy quits out of being his son. One episode of Batman: The Brave and the Bold (possibly the best Batman animated incarnation) combines all of that Superman weirdness into an episode where Superman (played by Roger Rose) ends up fighting Batman. So not only does it pay tribute to both heroes' Silver Age stories, but also combines a bit from The Dark Knight Returns. It's seamless, silly, and probably my personal favorite incarnation of Superman to date.  Henry Cavill (Man of Steel) It may be still too early to tell on which end of the super spectrum Henry Cavill is going to end up, but I'm hoping it'll be positive. Cavill nails the look, but doesn't have the presence. I'm a bit worried for WB's future universe since Cavill can't seem to act even opposite of huge talents like Amy Adams and Michael Shannon. But his darker, and more mature, take on Superman may bring the hero to places we've never seen. But who knows what the future holds. Who's the best Superman? Oh, let's just say...Moe. Who do you think makes the best on screen Superman? 
Superman bein' Superman photo
The most super of the supermen
With Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice just a few days away and fulfills a dream I've had since I was a kid, I figured it was a good time to celebrate Superman's long history on film. But just simply recounting actors that h...

Supergirl Trailer photo
Supergirl Trailer

Check out this fun trailer for CBS' Supergirl/The Flash crossover


Mar 23
// Nick Valdez
If you're excited about the prospect of two of your favorite heroes teaming up onscreen but hate the dour tone Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice has taken, then the upcoming Supergirl and The Flash crossover episode is what ...
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Star Wars' Daisy Ridley in unofficial talks for Tomb Raider reboot


More like Tomb REYder, eh?
Mar 21
// Geoff Henao
Could Daisy Ridley be the next Angelina Jolie? Maybe not, but she could be the next Lara Croft. During the Empire Awards in London this past weekend, the Star Wars: The Force Awakens star spoke to The Hollywood Reporter ...
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Mark Hamill and Kevin Conroy return for next animated Batman film, The Killing Joke


Mar 15
// Nick Valdez
DC and Warner Bros may be struggling with their big budget movies, but they've been dominating the home video and TV space for a long time. After the Bruce and Dini animation era, and after rebooting their animated properties...
Peculiar Trailer photo
Peculiar Trailer

First trailer for Tim Burton's Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children


Mar 15
// Nick Valdez
While Tim Burton has fallen off a bit lately, his films are still worth watching for interesting stuff alone. And it looks like thanks to the strange world of Ransome Riggs' novel, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children ...
New Civil War trailer photo
New Civil War trailer

New Captain Americal: Civil War trailer has what we've been waiting for


"Hey everyone."
Mar 10
// Sean Walsh
The new Captain America: Civil War trailer is here and oh my God I'm literally shaking. I don't want to say anything else about it. Just watch it. Oh my Goddddddddddddddd, just watch it. OH MY GODDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD. With...
JGL leaves Sandman photo
Sandman is back in development hell
Neil Gaiman's Sandman is one of the most celebrated comics of the 90s. It's also one of the most difficult to adapt. It seemed like there was some hope for the project (that's long been in development hell) when Joseph Gordon...

Power Rangers Reboot photo
Power Rangers Reboot

Here's the Power Rangers movie cast without their suits


Mar 04
// Nick Valdez
It may seem silly now (and feel free to refer back to this post when this all blows up in my face), but it seems like the Power Rangers movie is my most anticipated film of 2017. It's a property I have a huge connection with ...
Dark Tower photo
Maybe Roland will finally make it
I was pretty confident that this round of "we're making a Dark Tower" movie was going to end in the same way all the others did: cancellation. However, they got a director and then there were casting rumors and now we have ac...


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