Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around


horror

 photo

Gremlins 3 sequel may be happening with Chris Columbus attached


Don't read after midnight
Aug 17
// Rick Lash
Talks of a third Gremlins film have been on the winds for going on two decades now. Original director Joe Dante apparently indicated at one point the sequel was dead because the technology made to create Gremlins and Gre...
Killing of a Sacred Deer photo
Killing of a Sacred Deer

Trailer: The Killing of a Sacred Deer showcases unnerved Nicole Kidman & Colin Farrell


Yorgos Lanthimos gonna Yorgos Lanthimos
Aug 16
// Hubert Vigilla
I'm guaranteed to watch anything from Greek filmmaker Yorgos Lanthimos. Dogtooth haunted and disturbed me, and two-thirds of The Lobster is some of the best commentary on modern love I've seen. Lanthimos is back with his late...
 photo

Nosferatu remake will reteam The Witch star and director


I'd like to unlive deliciously
Aug 16
// Anthony Marzano
On Tuesday it was confirmed that Anya Taylor-Joy, star of The Witch (which I will henceforth refer to by it's much cooler stylized title) and M. Night Shyamalan's Split was in talks to reunite with director Robert Eggers for ...
 photo

mother! trailer with Jennifer Lawrence makes you wee in your pants a little bit


Just a drop or two, but still!
Aug 11
// Rick Lash
I've always thought Jennifer Lawrence (Passengers, The Hunger Games) and Javier Bardem (Skyfall, No Country for Old Men) would make a great couple. Like, they have so much in common, and obviously there'd just be so...

Annabelle photo
Annabelle

See Annabelle: Creation early and free


Washington DC and Baltimore screenings
Aug 04
// Matthew Razak
If you had told me that The Conjuring would spawn a franchise of horror films over the coming years from its release I would have been pretty surprised. Yet here we are with a sequel to a spin-off from that film. Who kno...
Mother! teaser trailer photo
Mother! teaser trailer

Darren Aronofsky's Mother! gets a teaser, with a full trailer coming next week


Well... something seems amiss, don't it?
Jul 31
// Hubert Vigilla
Mother!, the new Darren Aronofsky movie, is veiled in secrecy. The film stars Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem, and details about the plot are scant. A disturbing poster for the film came out in May, and there was an effective all-audio teaser that screened with Dunkirk. Now we have our first look at Mother! in this brief teaser, and it looks really intense. Check out the Mother! teaser below.
 photo

First full trailer for IT makes it really hard to write a story about it without the pronoun it


Thank goodness for italics
Jul 27
// Matthew Razak
IT is finally here. Or the remake of it is finally here. Stephen King's classic horror story already had a TV version that made us all insanely afraid of clowns (or at least Tim Curry dressed up as a clown), but now...
 photo

Your Bad Movie Night Guide, Vol. 2: Zombeavers


Can we please stop with the beaver jokes
Jul 22
// Rick Lash
Some movies are so bad they're good. Like last week's entry, Shark Attack 3: Megalodon; while it appears that it must have been somewhat selfaware (one would hope), at other times, it clearly took itself plenty seri...

NYAFF Capsule Review: Mon Mon Mon Monsters

Jul 22 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
[embed]221676:43676:0[/embed] Mon Mon Mon MonstersDirector: Giddens KoRelease Date: TBDCountry: Taiwan
Mon Mon Monsters Review photo
Something different
Giddens Ko’s You Are the Apple of My Eye remains one of the best films I’ve seen at the New York Asian Film Festival. Café. Waiting. Love, which he wrote but did not direct, is another film I enjoyed immens...

Spawny Boy photo
Spawny Boy

Todd McFarlane to direct new R-rated, lower budget Spawn movie


S to the p to the a to the awn
Jul 22
// Nick Valdez
20 years ago Michael Jai White and John Leguizamo put on some crazy outfits and delivered an even crazier film with Spawn. While Todd MacFarlane's Spawn will never be as popular as it was in 1997, a film version now makes sen...
 photo

Jigsaw, aka Saw 8, aka Not The Final Chapter has new trailer & poster


Jul 20
// Rick Lash
In movie sequel news [aka nearly all movie news], the eighth and probably not final Saw film, Jigsaw#mce_temp_url#, has a new trailer and a new teaser poster to accompany it. If you're unaware of the timel...
 photo

The Walking Dead Season 8 gets a release date


The show keeps staggering forward
Jul 19
// Drew Stuart
Ah, San Diego Comic Con. It is a time of celebration, of renewal, of congregating with your fellow nerds and geeks, to peer inside the entertainment industry and see what lays for thou over the horizon. Truly, it is a time un...
 photo

New Death Note Poster looks better than the Show


Not the anime, the Netflix one, duh
Jun 27
// Drew Stuart
You remember Death Note, right? No, I'm not talking about the critically-acclaimed anime, or its manga counterpart. I'm talking about the Adam Wingard directed, takes-place-in-the-US-Netflix-original-movie known as Death Note...
 photo

Saw 8 has title: Jigsaw ... comes with weird puzzley graphic


Charlie Brown: An 8th Saw-Oh good grief!
Jun 21
// Rick Lash
Because Hollywood is the land of opportunity [read: a complete and utter lack of originality] and audiences are so nuanced of taste and subtly responsive to the creative processes of their filmmakers [read: sheeple who will w...

Review: 47 Meters Down

Jun 16 // Rick Lash
[embed]221613:43604:0[/embed] 47 Meters DownDirector: Johannes RobertRelease Date: June 16, 2016Rated: PG-13 By and large, director Johannes Robert managed this film masterfully. Little is wasted, and most stays true to form. The opening title sequence of a dark, ominous underwater scene proves to be the inside of a swimming pool. And one girl overturns another on a raft, causing a glass of wine to hit water and spread in pure imitation of blood. It’s one of the few times the director gets too heavyhanded: we know it’s a shark movie; no portent necessary. It’s then that we’re introduced to sisters Lisa (Mandy Moore) and Kate (Claire Holt). Lisa’s the stick in the mud whose boyfriend has left her because she’s too boring, while Kate’s the sort to tell her sister to get over it by banging the first bar fly she can find their side of the border in Mexico. When said bar fly recommends the sisters go cage diving with great white sharks, our story is set in motion. Writer Anthony Jaswinski admits the film follows the 127 Hours format—he means that you’re predominantly with one (or in this case, two) character for the duration, after some early introductions. But the similarities don’t end there; the format also calls for a sticky situation to keep your character alone, and we’re quickly provided one when the cage the girls go diving in proves to be of less than reliable quality and ends up on the ocean’s floor. That’s the premise. The cage is separated from boat. There are hungry, 25-foot sharks in the water. And our sisters are stuck in said cage with limited air supply. The film’s stars have said that this is not just a shark movie; it’s more than that. It’s a movie about being stuck at sea. This is true. It’s not just a shark movie; it’s really a movie that draws on and capitalizes on the many primal fears inherent in mankind: fear of being adrift at sea; fear of being adrift and immersed at sea; fear of the unknown (either under the water, or in the dark); fear of drowning; fear or suffocation; fear of being trapped; the fear of the immensity of everything else versus your own insignificance; fear of being at the mercy of forces greater than you; fear of being eaten alive. Where The Shallows began, 47 Meters Down continues, and ups the ante, allowing murphy’s law to dictate events. In an underwater cage surrounded by massive sharks? The cage will fail and leave you stranded. Have air tanks? Your supply is low. Have radios in rebreathers? You will be out of range. Reconnect the cage to a winch? The cable will fail. Get extra air tanks? You will face sharks. You get the idea. It’s a litany of what can go wrong, will go wrong, to the point where it borders on association with torture porn. These girls cannot catch a break, up until the film’s conclusion. And maybe not even then. The twists and turns deserve to remain in tact, in the dark, for you to enjoy unspoiled. But what can safely be said is that 47 Meters Down plays on your worst fears and delivers psychological terror. I had to detach myself to the ninth degree to watch it passively in order to write about it now. But if you allow yourself to be immersed in the dark of the theater, you’ll find yourself helplessly dragged in the film’s jaws, kicking and screaming, for the duration. The emotions are real; both Moore and Hoult spent more time underwater filming than is normal, and it reads. Robert directed them from above the water’s surface and had underwater crew on a different radio channel so that only he could communicate with the girls. They got a small taste of what they portrayed, and this was captured wonderfully and transcribed expertly. While, as noted, this is a shark film, the director must know the material well; where other films would get lost in the violence, Robert uses tension to perfection, and deaths, when they come, are impactful, but not focused on, and the tension is instantly restrung, meaning that you’re never quite off the hook. With few miscues—an unnecessary camera spin in one ascending shott--the film succeeds independently of the its sister film from 2016—even if you’ve seen The Shallows, you should still see 47 Meters Down.
 photo
Measures Up
47 Meters Down is a shark movie—if shark movie is a genre. No, not the campy, so-good-they’re-bad shark movies we’ve been getting for a decade and a half now [ask anyone I know—my favorite of these is ...

Happy Death Day photo
Happy Death Day

Trailer: Slasher movie Happy Death Day could also be titled Groundhog Die


Amiright or amiright? Amiright?
Jun 16
// Hubert Vigilla
Happy Death Day looks like my cheesy kind of jam. Take the hook of Groundhog Day, apply it to a slasher movie, and--bing--you have my attention for 90 minutes. (But not a minute more.) Yes, Happy Death Day is like Groundhog D...
Tom Cruise The Mummy photo
Tom Cruise The Mummy

Tom Cruise's excessive creative control may have ruined The Mummy


More like The Crum-- I can't even finish
Jun 15
// Hubert Vigilla
The Mummy isn't doing so hot. Poor reviews and a lackluster box office have put the entire Dark Universe cinematic universe in jeopardy. That might not be a bad thing, though. I mean, do we really need an Invisible Man movie ...
The Gracefield Incident photo
The Gracefield Incident

Trailer: Found-footage movie The Gracefield Incident has aliens and a high-tech glass eye


Fake eye and aliens and things
Jun 14
// Hubert Vigilla
There will be no end to found-footage movies. (Barring some worldwide cataclysm that ends film and society as we know it, of course.) They're inexpensive and, in a handful of instances, innovative and inventive. Those rare fi...
David Bowie: The Image photo
David Bowie: The Image

Watch The Image, a 1969 horror short film starring a young David Bowie


At the time, this was rated X
Jun 13
// Hubert Vigilla
David Bowie had a memorable, otherworldly presence on screen. He was a believable strung out alien in The Man Who Fell to Earth, a seductive strung out vampire in The Hunger, a dance-happy goblin king in Labyrinth, a proper B...
 photo

Flatliners reboot is a thing: shiny new undead trailer, poster


Do not resusitate?
Jun 13
// Rick Lash
Flatliners has been revived. Someone failed to note the DNR checked box on the back of it's 1990, expired driver's license and gave it a few thousand volts from a defibrillator. You're welcome. Because it's been 27 years and ...
 photo

47 Meters Down released a trailer a month ago: who knew?


Shark Movie! Summer Shark Movie!
Jun 13
// Rick Lash
Really, this movie is so little on the radar that its trailer got no PR and had been out for a month before I saw a spot watching the NBA Finals (widely known fact that basketball fans love shark movies nearly as much as they...
Hellboy reboot art photo
Hellboy reboot art

Hellboy reboot releases Mike Mignola promo art, aims at a 2018 release


Mignola/del Toro split is apparent
May 18
// Hubert Vigilla
By now you've probably heard that Hellboy 3 from Guillermo del Toro is dead, but there's an R-rated Hellboy reboot in the works titled Hellboy: Rise of the Blood Queen. Director Neil Marshall (The Descent) is in talks to dire...
Mother! photo
Mother!

First poster for Aronofsky's Mother! has Jennifer Lawrence and her heart


Happy Mother's Day, I guess
May 15
// Matthew Razak
We know almost nothing about Darren Aronofsky's next movie, Mother!. The release of a new poster tells us even less, except that it should be as visually striking and thematically challenging as his previous films. Take a loo...
The Strangers 2 photo
The Strangers 2

Christina Hendricks most likely will get blood on her in The Strangers 2


Creepy masks still creepy
May 12
// Matthew Razak
The Strangers was a surprise smash horror film that came out nine years ago. We weren't even writing reviews then. If we were I would have said something about it being a solid little thriller, buoyed by Liv Tyler and Scott S...
Thom Yorke Suspiria photo
Thom Yorke Suspiria

Radiohead's Thom Yorke will compose the score for Luca Guadagnino's Suspiria remake


BAH GAWD! THAT'S THOM YORKE'S MUSIC!
May 10
// Hubert Vigilla
Dario Argento's Suspiria is one of the great Italian horror films. Released in 1977, it plays out like a colorful, strange, dreamlike supernatural fairy tale. I've never found it scary, but its visual style and bright color p...
R-rated Hellboy reboot photo
R-rated Hellboy reboot

Hellboy reboot in the works from director Neil Marshall and Stranger Things' David Harbour


No Del Toro or Perlman involvement
May 09
// Hubert Vigilla
Hellboy may be coming back to the big screen, but it's going to be without director Guillermo del Toro and star Ron Perlman. A Hellboy reboot is in the works from director Neil Marshall (The Descent, Game of Thrones), wi...
Aliens photo
Aliens

See Alien: Covenant early and free


Washington DC and Baltimore screenings
May 05
// Matthew Razak
Ridley Scott is bringing the Xenomorphs back to where they should be. After the weirdness that was Prometheus it looks like the franchise will be returning to its horror roots. Or at least a rickety spaceship with people dying in it. Want to check the movie out first? Grab the passes below and be on your way. This one is sure to have an incredibly long line so make sure you get there early. 
David Fincher WWZII photo
aka The World War Z-quel
According to a report tonight from Variety, David Fincher is close to a deal to direct World War Z 2, the sequel to the 2013 Brad Pitt zombie film loosely adapted from the book by Max Brooks. While Fincher is apparently wary ...

The Mist trailer photo
The Mist trailer

Trailer for Spike TV's The Mist series takes the Stephen King story beyond the store


It's all foggy and misty
Apr 12
// Hubert Vigilla
Frank Darabont's 2007 adaptation of The Mist played out like a long, taut episode of The Twilight Zone. The movie offered one hell of a downbeat final scene--maybe mockingly downbeat--that differed drastically from the closin...

Review: The Void

Apr 10 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]221365:43495:0[/embed] The VoidDirectors: Steven Kostanski and Jeremy GillespieRating: NRRelease Date: March 31, 2017 (UK); April 7, 2017 (US)  Daniel (Aaron Poole), a small town cop, finds a distraught man on an empty road in the middle of the night. This guy's just fled from a mysterious home invasion and murder, but Daniel doesn't know that. Daniel brings the man to the local hospital for treatment. A group of cultists surround the hospital, and strange, cosmic horror-y things begin to happen. The characters are quickly hewn from familiar tropes: the protagonist's estranged wife (Kathleen Munroe), a pregnant woman about to deliver (Grace Munro), a caring town doctor everyone respects (Kenneth Welsh), and two killers with uncertain motives who may or may not be good guys (Daniel Fathers and Mik Byskov). This group has to fend off the evil outside while strange powers turn people into tentacled, tumored, cyst-covered creatures that are a little bit H.P. Lovecraft and a lot of Rob Bottin. It's a modest set up, but there's a lot to do within that framework. Writers/co-directors Steven Kostanski and Jeremy Gillespie know their way around genre conventions and the camera. As the film goes wild with creatures and slime, they do an admirable job of making their film feel like an artifact of the VHS era. Even though the characters are usually one-note, there's a genuine sense of tension as they fight for their lives. In the first creature scene I think the effects are shown too obliquely and there's too much flickering light, but Kostanski and Gillespie typically show their horrors in all of their wonderful, lymphy madness. Yet as The Void unfolded, I felt like I was mostly noticing nods to other films rather than getting lost in The Void. When The Void revealed a plot twist, I thought about another movie; when a creature appeared on screen, I thought about another movie; even when The Void ended, I thought about another movie (two, actually). What I'm getting at: The Void is a great stroll through a videostore, but it doesn't go that additional step beyond its influences to become its own thing. I think about cover bands that don't quite twist the original enough, or maybe a tribute band--songs in the style of a downbeat Lucio Fulci zombie movie as done by John Carpenter. It's not like Kostanski and Gillespie lacked their own material. The mythology of their cosmic horror is promising. Sadly, it's left vague--a pretext for plot rather than something fully realized--and they never allow their own mythology's eldritch contours to wrest control from their genre forebears. There was so much unexplored territory they could have covered, but they stuck to the well-worn paths that others had made before them. I couldn't help but feel disappointed even though I liked what I saw. Experiences like this that make me appreciate the originality of those seminal 80s horror and sci-fi films. It's easy and enjoyable to recreate moods and pay homage to scenes, but much harder to go that extra step and create something genre-defining. That said, I want to see what Kostanski and Gillespie do next. There's promise in The Void, and maybe if I were younger or hadn't grown up watching the same movies the filmmakers did, I would find the movie more satisfying. I just hope in their next movie Kostanski and Gillespie get away from the videostore and put more of themselves and their original ideas front and center.
Review: The Void photo
Fulci + Carpenter + Lovecraft
The 80s aesthetic is chic these days in genre films. Just take a look at Beyond the Black Rainbow, It Follows, or The Guest, among others. Homage and pastiche don't guarantee quality, of course, but it's an indicator tha...


Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...