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sequels

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Jerry Bruckheimer says no Johnny Depp, no Pirates of the Caribbean


Fools! James Hook IS Neverland!s
May 27
// Rick Lash
Right on the heels of yours truly proclaiming that "I imagine this franchise isn’t going anywhere ... perhaps one day we will get another actor to play Jack Sparrow," Jerry Bruckheimer, franchise mega-producer, came out...
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Madea Halloween getting a sequel


Or is it like a 20-quel?
May 26
// Matthew Razak
Word from Deadline is that Boo! A Madea Halloween is getting a sequel called Boo 2! A Madea Halloween. That's probably the most awkward movie title ever, and may not even be factually correct since every Madea ...

Review: Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell no Tales

May 26 // Rick Lash
[embed]221557:43576:0[/embed] Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No TalesDirectors:  Joachim Rønning and Espen SandbergRelease Date: May 26, 2017Rated: PG-13 Both Will Turner (Orlando Bloom) and Elizabeth Swann (Kiera Knightly) have been absent from the franchise since At World’s End, so it may come as a surprise that the first character we meet, a young boy and expert on the sea’s supernatural lore, actually turns out to be their progeny. The opening scene quickly puts him in touch with Orlando Bloom, but my gut worried, watching it play out, that Orlando wasn’t really back for the film, more as a cameo—a nod to the Pirates glory days, and I didn’t expect to see him again until the film’s conclusion. Sadly, this proved true. But this sequence informs us of the driving narrative need of the film: Will Turner’s son, Henry Turner (Brenton Thwaites) wants to break his father’s curse that binds him to the Flying Dutchman, the ship that Will inherited from Davey Jones, and prevents Will from returning to his family. Let’s be clear about this, while Depp and Rush, in faithful turns as Captains Sparrow and Barbosa, carry the film, their narrative needs do not. This story is not theirs; it’s a story driven by a new, younger generation, Thwaites and Kaya Scodelario (Carina Smyth), and their mutual quest to find the Trident of Poseidon, the only object powerful enough to break all the sea’s curses. This is a problem, to a degree structurally, as Depp and Rush are there to support Thwaites and Scodelario, but the opposite plays out onscreen. Depp and Rush remain instrumental to not only the story, but the heart of the film. Their characters are fully developed, have history and depth, lending weight to what happens. While our new characters are not as emotionally resonant, despite admirable attempts to add depth in the brief time allotted by the script. Scodelario shines as a smart woman immersed in heavy colonial ignorance, whose education, drive, and intelligence are quickly branded and trumped by labels of “witch” at every turn to effective fanfare and laughs. But this imbalance in story and reality carries further. Sparrow particularly, goes through the motions without clear motivation. He’s drinking, wenching, and getting in and out of trouble with the same brilliance-come-ineptitude he always does, but here he has no drive and seems simply along for the ride. One can only assume because a Pirates movie without Depp / Jack Sparrow would not be a Pirates movie—a fact producers must have admitted, despite Depp’s box office woes, massive losses for another Disney vehicle (The Lone Ranger), and owing to his massive pay day for this turn. Javier Bardem plays the villain, Captain Salazar, to appropriate levels of villainy, but in this, he and his crew are weak, third iterations of undead pirate miscreants. They seem very much par for the course, and are feared, inexplicably, by men who have faced the same and worse in Pirates films past. What adds a fresh ocean breeze are the infusion of undead gulls and, particularly, sharks—a nice expansion of the undead monkey theme (little Jack does make his own appearance, to useful purpose as well). Similarly, it’s the undead pirates’ walking and running across the water’s surface (very much biblical in allusion) adding a nice correlation to the pirates from the original when they “take a walk” underwater. In many ways, what works best here is what has always worked for the franchise (including Hans Zimmer’s wonderful orchestral and epic score). The same can be said for the film’s over the top action sequences and elaborate stunts. Almost zany in nature, the stunts are as true to the franchise as ever. And, as usual, they are made to work through humor and well placed gags and jokes. The film is funny, I found myself laughing often, partly just in plain appreciation for the continuation of what made earlier Pirates films successful—and here Dead Men Tell no Tales may even succeed more than some of the other sequels. It is quite funny. The audience I viewed it with were laughing more than many audiences at pure comedies. It was hearty, and again, appreciative. Carina’s misfortune at having studied astronomy and horology (the study of time) are used wonderfully for extended bits. There’s probably room for a more meritorious review to dive deep into the depths of how female protagonists in these films are sexualized, reduced to heaving bosoms (albeit heaving bosoms that continually outmaneuver and perform their male counterparts), and stereotypes quite aware of their misfortune of living in the age they do. And there’s probably something to say regarding how these heroines are denied true independence as men continually feel the need to sacrifice themselves on their behalf, denying them their own narrative decision making power. But we’ll only hint that this imagined meritorious review can do this, and better—for we are not said review. Directors Joachim Rønning and Espen Sandberg purportedly tried to emulate Gore Verbinski’s directing of the first three films, and you do feel it here, but the heart they tried to infuse is meek and only succeeds by forced inclusions of plot developments that seem tacked on and don’t serve the majority of the movie. Here, see twists on why exactly this new female protagonist, Scodelario, has been introduced. Or what exactly happens when Will Turner’s curse is lifted, as you must come to expect will come to pass. What succeeds is what has always succeeded, and here, in film five, with apparent plans for more, pending the financial success or failure of the latest (by no means guaranteed given a $230M production budget), I imagine this franchise isn’t going anywhere. To me, seeing new characters come and go to flesh these vessels out while the underlying bones remain the same is reminiscent of the James Bond franchise; perhaps one day we will get another actor to play Jack Sparrow (though they successfully prove they can CGI him younger here), as unimaginable as that seems, and the franchise will reinvent itself by progression. Let’s just hope Johnny Depp and Disney learn from Sean Connery’s mistakes—once you’re out, you’re out: don’t come back.
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18 pound balls
It’s been nearly 14 years since audiences were first treated to Johnny Depp’s Captain Jack Sparrow. At the time, Roger Ebert said that Depp’s “performance is original in its every atom. There has ...

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Tom Cruise: Top Gun Sequel is on like Donkey Kong


Topper Gun. Top Gunnest. The Top Gun.
May 24
// Rick Lash
Though industry rags (yes you, Variety) have yet to run with this blasphemy, reputable rags like USA Today are reporting on the revelation that aired on some little known news program from ... and let me confirm I'm getting t...

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Universal unveils Dark Universe cast, logo, and Russell Crowe voiceover


May 23
// Rick Lash
We’ve known since 2014 that Universal wanted a piece of this super hot ‘cinematic universe’ (©Marvel) action. It’s all the rage. After all, they’re friggin’ UNIVERSAL—how could t...
The Strangers 2 photo
The Strangers 2

Christina Hendricks most likely will get blood on her in The Strangers 2


Creepy masks still creepy
May 12
// Matthew Razak
The Strangers was a surprise smash horror film that came out nine years ago. We weren't even writing reviews then. If we were I would have said something about it being a solid little thriller, buoyed by Liv Tyler and Scott S...
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8-bit Last Jedi

8-bit Trailer for The Last Jedi recreates the feel of SNES Star Wars games


16-bit trailer, but oh well
May 10
// Hubert Vigilla
The first trailer for Star Wars: The Last Jedi was pretty darn great. It teased some of the action to come, but thankfully didn't seem to give away any of the story. To put it another way, the trailer whet the appetite withou...
Alien Sequel photo
Alien Sequel

Alien: Covenant sequel to film within 14 months


Game over, man. Game over.
May 10
// Matthew Razak
If the reviews are to be believed, and they should be because we wrote it, Alien: Covenant is not a good movie, and is definitely not the space horror film you thought you were getting. However, that probably won't stop ...
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Edge of Tomorrow

Edge of Tomorrow sequel has a title, sadly it's not Groundhog Die


Edge of 2morrow
May 09
// Hubert Vigilla
Edge of Tomorrow was much better than most people expected. Sure, the movie got a little conventional in the finale, but the first three-quarters of the movie used the respawning conceit brilliantly. When the film was release...

Review: Alien: Covenant

May 06 // Alec Kubas-Meyer
[embed]221515:43550:0[/embed] Alien: CovenantDirector: Ridley ScottRelease Date: May 18, 2017Rating: R  Coming from Covenant’s marketing campaign, you might be surprised by the first name in its opening credits: Michael Fassbender. And right off the bat we know that something is wrong, because in the trailer that was pretty cool for two minutes (before being very, very stupid right at the end), you see Fassbender… twice? We’ve been led to believe that Katherine Waterson is our protagonist, and yet we don’t begin the film with her (rather with Fassbender’s David character, from Prometheus). And then we go to Fassbender’s other character, an android named Walter. We aren’t introduced to the cast until after the first exciting thing happens: A solar event damages the ship and forces the crew members from their cryosleep. In the chaos that ensues, we finally meet our Ripley. And it just goes downhill from there. The first thing you see Daniels – the Strong Independent Woman who is going to take down the xenomorph at the end (one would assume) – do is fail to get out of her sleeping pod. You see some guys get out, then they help her. And then her husband, played perplexingly for less than two minutes by James Franco, can’t get out… but no one can get him out either and he burns up in his pod. And then we’re treated to our Strong Independent Woman being sad about her dead husband while watching a video he left her on a tablet. Ugh. But Daniels doesn’t take over; she’s second in command to Billy Krudup’s character, who is sad that no one respects him and thinks it is because he is a man of faith (there is no evidence to support this). Their ship is transporting a couple thousand colonists to their new home, but after the solar incident and the death of their captain, everyone is a little iffy about getting back into their cryogenic pods – especially since Walter tells them there is a not-insignificant chance that this kind of thing could happen again. Conveniently (or not), they receive a distress beacon from a nearby planet that falls perfectly within the habitable zone. It’s weeks away rather than years, so Krudup decides they should go check it out. When hell breaks loose however many minutes later, I found myself thinking not about what I was seeing but about my complete lack of reaction to it. Technically, there’s some good stuff here. There are some genuinely great shots, and the production design in general is very cool. But functionally there’s nothing. You know what emotion you’re supposed to feel because you have an understanding of cinematic language. The music swells, the camera gets shaky, and the editing gets jumping; oh, something tense is going on. But I don’t feel any tension. And then I’m watching Amy Seimetz fire on a baby xenomorph and thinking about why this doesn’t work for me. Even the body horror stuff that sort of worked didn’t really work. [embed]221515:43549:0[/embed] The Chestburster in the original Alien was a genuinely shocking moment. It’s probably one of cinema’s most iconic images, and works on pretty much every level. Alien: Covenant knows that a xenomorph bursting from a chest isn’t good enough anymore, so it has a few much more disturbing ways to birth aliens from a human body. And they’re definitely disgusting, getting the grossed-out reaction from the crowd that they were going for, but the intensity of the violence doesn’t actually serve the plot in any meaningful way. It’s just horrific imagery for the sake of it, there to shock the audience more than the characters in the film. You may appreciate the inventiveness for a moment, but then you have to deal with the CGI xenomorphs that come out and all the gorgeous practical effects that lead up to it can’t stop you from groaning. Or laughing. The audience laughed a lot. They actually clapped a couple of times, usually after the Xenomorph had killed someone in a particularly vicious way. I wondered about that: Why? Was it because the characters were so boring that everyone was just glad they were dead? I mean, I had already forgotten several of the characters by the time the credits rolled, only remembering once I rewatched the trailer just to make sure that it was, in fact, selling the same product that I had just witnessed. The crew on the Covenant probably had names, but I only remember two of them: Daniels and Tennessee. (There is also Walter, but we’ll get to that later.) Tennessee is played by Danny McBride, and he’s got a fairly unpleasant personality, but he’s the only one who actually has personality at all. The characters are largely expendable, and the script seems well aware of that, because it makes no attempt to develop anyone who dies early and only a marginal effort to develop the ones who make it to the third act. The four-plus-minute scene that I mentioned earlier, a slice of which is featured in that trailer, is important because it’s not actually in the movie. Like, at all. And it’s interesting because watching that clip after seeing the film, I saw more character development for some of those people than in the entire two hours of nonsense I sat through. I would assume that it was originally supposed to be part of the film; it seems odd that it wouldn’t be, and it’s the only time James Franco says things while alive. It actually feels like it’s from a completely different movie. They talk about the crew members, but make no reference to all of the other (sleeping) colonists on the ship. Watching that, I would never have known that they weren’t the sole bodies aboard the Covenant. And sure, it makes only marginally less sense than the stuff the characters actually do say, but it leads me to wonder what place it was supposed to serve… and what the movie was supposed to look like. Because I don’t believe for a second that Alien: Covenant is the movie that it was supposed to be. Clearly it’s not the movie that Fox’s marketing department wanted it to be, but I have trouble believing it’s the movie Ridley Scott was trying to make. Then again, I don’t have any idea what movie he was trying to make, because there’s no consistency of any sort. Really, it feels like the movie is fucking with you sometimes. Nowhere is this clearer than the truly bizarre sequences like the one where Michael Fassbender as David (who just-so-happens to be on this planet) is showing Michael Fassbender as Walter how to play the recorder. The camera swings back and forth in a long take as one Fassbender tells the other about “fingering holes,” something that happens for several straight minutes. That sequence is probably as long as the character-building clip I mentioned that didn’t make it into the film… yet somehow the innuendo-filled recorder scene is important? At first, I was convinced that David was going to kill Walter and take over his place at this point, maybe force the recorder through Walter’s throat, but no: He literally just shows him how to play the recorder. It’s just two Michael Fassbenders, like Ridley Scott finally figured out the facial technology that David Fincher has been using for years and wanted to show it off. Look, Fassbender is one of my favorite actors, and if they want to have scenes of just him talking to himself, that’s fine… but this is just stupid. As with most scenes David is in, there seems to be an attempt at philosophy. As I mentioned, Fassbender is the protagonist, both as David and Walter. They’re two very different models of the same Android, and the underlying logic behind their creation could lead to some interesting discussions. There are hints of that, and other things. David talks (constantly) about creation and perfection and humanity and love, but these proclamations aren’t part of a dialogue. It’s like listening to a college freshman who read “Ozymandias” for the first time and has now figured out the meaning of life and really, really wants to tell you about how cool he is. He says vapid things in vain attempts at profundity, and it’s just sad. It’s theoretically an extension of the ideas raised in Prometheus (particularly with regards to creation), but it’s ultimately nothing at all. And that’s Alien: Covenant as a whole. It’s nothing. By the time this review is published, I will likely have forgotten everything about it, except for the feelings it left me with. I wanted it to be good; I wanted that oh-so badly. I wanted Ridley Scott to prove he still had it. But Covenant proves that he does not. This is Scott giving up on his most famous franchise. This is me giving up on him.
Alien: Covenant Review photo
Fool Me Twice
As reviled as it is (justifiably or not), Prometheus deserves a little pass for being unlike its Alien siblings in large part because of its branding. It may be in the same canon, but it’s not pretending to be an Alien ...

Review: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

May 03 // Matthew Razak
[embed]221505:43546:0[/embed] Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2Director: James GunnRating: PG-13Release Date: May 5, 2017 We should just get this out of the way first: even if this movie sucked more than Suicide Squad I'd recommend it just to see baby Groot. Baby Groot is the cutest, adorablest, most bestest thing that has ever happened on a movie screen. His adorableness could reduce a theater of hardened criminals into a gaggle of teenage girls who have just seen 12 puppies playing with 12 kittens with some baby otters splashing in a pool nearby under the watchful eye of 3 baby pandas trying to lick fruit out of an ice cube while a group of babies give those tiny baby smiles that make your heart melt. You cannot even understand the level of Internet-breaking cute baby Groot is.  It's pretty clear director James Gunn understands what he has on his hands as well. The entire opening sequence trains the camera on baby Groot doing a dance number to ELO's "Mr. Blue Sky" while the rest of the Guardians battle it out with a giant space creature in the background. It's a fantastically creative opening reestablishing why Guardians feels so different from the rest of the Marvel universe and brings us right back into the team's dynamics while making sure everyone understands baby Groot is the best.  Those team dynamics are at the forefront this time around. After establishing their new family the intrepid group of heroes -- consisting of Star-Lord (Chris Pratt), Gamora (Zoe Saldana), Drax (Dave Bautista), Rocket (Bradley Cooper), and Groot (Vin Diesel) -- are still bickering among each other as they charge for their services throughout the universe. Rocket lands them in a heap of trouble by stealing some fancy batteries from some gold aliens called the Sovereign. This leads the Sovereign's high priestess Ayesha (Elizabeth Debicki) to hunt them down, but the group is saved by none other than Star-Lord's father, Ego (Kurt Russel). Turns out Ego is a Celestial, an ancient being, and now a living planet. Basically Star-Lord has some god in him. Meanwhile Ayesha hires Yondu (Michael Rooker) to chase down the Guardians, and Nebula (Karen Gillan) is on her own quest to kill Gamora. Basically, the band's back together. Vol. 2 has a lot to unpack, and it spends a lot of time unpacking it. Its overall themes are about family and friendship, especially fatherhood, thanks to the parenting love triangle that is Star-Lord/Ego/Yondu, but it also needs to get through a ton of exposition because of the mass amount of character background it needs to unpack. That can get a bit cumbersome. While the original film moved effortlessly through its emotional cues and action, Vol. 2 sometimes feels like its pulling you along so we can get to those spots. Exposition dominates a lot of the interaction between Star-Lord and Ego; meaning the emotional punch gets a little lost. Luckily it's made up for in a lot of other areas. The relationship between the crew is still fantastic even when the screenplay gets a bit too on the nose. Gunn and the cast just know how to make this crew work, and they continue to do it all while merging Nebula and Yondu more fully into things. The clunkier segments of dialogue can't keep down the actual spark that these guys have on screen together (even if a chunk of the team is completely digital).  Then there's the action. Gunn was let loose on this one. I can see the Marvel execs giving him carte blanche the second the first film exploded, and he goes wild with it. The opening I described above is just one example of him having an absolute blast with the action. There is a Yondu fight scene that is one of the most clever pieces of action I've seen from Marvel, and the final battle is simply stunning, and, more importantly, coherent. With a plethora of characters doing a plethora of things, Gunn manages to pull together an impressive sequence, which is no easy task. He's also a master at making sure punchlines hit. Even some of the cheesiest lines in the film are timed wonderfully, leading to what is probably the funniest of the Marvel films. Of course letting loose isn't always a good thing. Vol. 2 is a very busy movie with a lot going on almost all the time. The color palette used is massive and sometimes Gunn can get a little carried away with what he's doing. He's a good enough director to keep everything coherent, but a little restraint here or there may have been in order at times. That doesn't mean anything is bad, but things get a little overwhelming at points.  It always helps that your cast is fully into it. Pratt shines again in his leading role, showing why the first film turned him into a superstar. However, the biggest standout is probably Bautista, who is given a lot more dialogue and screen time in Vol. 2. He nails it. While Drax's whole shtick is not emoting, there's a skill to doing that while still emoting and Bautista does it with surprising adeptness. Baby Groot may steal the show, but it's Drax who grounds the film more than anything.  The film still stands on its own in the Marvel universe. In fact, it quite wisely almost entirely ignores the rest of the universe and its ongoing plot. There are mentions of Thanos, but he doesn't show up this time. There are five(!) teasers at the end, but none of them connect to the other Marvel films. Much like its style, humor, and themes, Vol. 2 stands apart from the rest of Marvel for now. That doesn't mean that comic fans won't have a few jaw dropping moments, but this is as far away from an Avengers tie-in as you can get. What it comes down to is that Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is just fun. It's funny as hell, full of touching and inspiring moments and despite its screenplay issues keeps its momentum going throughout. While it never quite captures the magic of the first film, it has its own. The first movie was such a surprise and so damn charming, that it's impossible for Vol. 2 to regain that feeling, but it makes its own, and it owns it. Even if it didn't it has baby Groot. -- After reviewing the first Guardians of the Galaxy, I noted it shared a lot of similarities with other films of its ilk while seeming unique enough through the Marvel lens. Vol. 2, however, throws that completely out the window and delivers an experience wholly its own. While Matt is absolutely correct about the sequels frantic nature, and stimulation overload, when the film focuses itself it can go to some truly remarkable depths not seen in many of the other MCU films. Dave Bautista is indeed the standout, once again, and grounds the crazy technicolor world in a way I didn't see coming. Gunn adds a unique flair to the MCU, again putting his stamp on the universe with some light body horror, soundtrack meshing with colorful action, but also doesn't let moments shine. Several emotional beats were undercut by constant jokes. The humor may land, but it's also constant. Taking a breath every so often would've been nice. -- Nick Valdez - 78
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Baby Groot is everything
When the first Guardians of the Galaxy hit I'm not sure any of us we're really prepared for it being as fantastic as it was. We weren't prepared for a team of mostly unknown superheroes being turned into one of Marvel's ...

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Spoiler: M. Night Shyamalan's Split & Unbreakable get one sequel, Glass, in 2019


Apr 28
// Rick Lash
Split, the first commercially and critically viable film from once superstar director M. Night Shyamalan in some years, was a pleasant surprise to say the least. To say more, it was capped off with a trademark M. Night twist ...
David Fincher WWZII photo
aka The World War Z-quel
According to a report tonight from Variety, David Fincher is close to a deal to direct World War Z 2, the sequel to the 2013 Brad Pitt zombie film loosely adapted from the book by Max Brooks. While Fincher is apparently wary ...

Official Cars 3 trailer looks like the Rocky III and IV of the franchise

Apr 26 // Hubert Vigilla
Despite the promising teases, this looks like a pretty run-of-the-mill Cars movie. I just hope the movie ends with Lightning McQueen, winded and bloodied, saying the following lines: If I can change gears... and you can change gears... EVERYBODY CAN CHANGE GEARS! Cars 3 arrives in theaters June 16th.
Cars 3 trailer photo
If I can change gears...
The first teaser for Cars 3 from last year suggested some dark tragedy for Lightning McQueen--possibly even death. An extended look at Cars 3 from earlier this year suggested the movie would be like Rocky III. Now we hav...

Kingsman 2 photo
Kingsman 2

Full trailer for Kingsman 2 cuts a good jib


Spoiler: Colin Firth is back
Apr 25
// Matthew Razak
After the prolificly well done teaser we received for Kingsman: The Golden Circle it should come as no surprise that the full trailer is damn fine too. Full off all the stuff we are now coming to expect from the Joel Edgerton...
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Deadpool 2, R-rated comic movie, gets summer 2018 release--holy $#!+


Apr 24
// Rick Lash
When Logan got an R-rating, and the substance to back it up, it was clear that the movie industry had embraced the trend begun by Deadpool in 2016. It was easy for them to do; pretty much everyone can embrace $783 million in ...
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Director James Gunn says Guardians of the Galaxy will be a trilogy


But never fear, they'll remake in a year
Apr 21
// Rick Lash
At the Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2 premiere, Director James Gunn, who was confirmed earlier this week to be returning to helm Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 3, indicated that GoTG would be a trilogy, at least in its curren...
Kingsman photo
Kingsman

First teaser for Kingsman: The Golden Circle plays up teaser status


Don't worry, you can slow it down
Apr 19
// Matthew Razak
In a world where we get trailers for trailers (we've sworn to never put one of those up) it's refreshing to see a teaser trailer as self aware as the one for Kingsman: The Golden Circle. It's also a brilliant piece of marketi...
Gunn doing Guardians 3 photo
Gunn doing Guardians 3

James Gunn will write and direct Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3


Come and get your trilogy of love
Apr 17
// Hubert Vigilla
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is one of our most anticipated movies of 2017. It comes out May 5, 2017, but there's already some information on the sequel. James Gunn previously confirmed there will be a Guardians of the Gala...
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Fate of the Furious races past global box office opening weekend record with $532.5M


Audiences still love cars, explosions
Apr 17
// Rick Lash
Universal's The Fate of the Furious, aka Vin Diesel Wears a Tank Top While Driving a Car 8, just did a rolling stop right through the previous record for biggest global opening weekend of all time with a haul of $532.5M, pass...
Carrie Fisher Star Wars 9 photo
Carrie Fisher Star Wars 9

Carrie Fisher will NOT appear in Star Wars IX says Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy


Wonder what that means for The Last Jedi
Apr 16
// Hubert Vigilla
Last Monday we reported that Carrie Fisher will appear in Star Wars Episode IX without the use of CGI doubles. Todd Fisher, Carrie Fisher's brother, mentioned this during a TCM event. As it turns out, Todd Fisher seems to hav...
Last Jedi/Force Awakens photo
Last Jedi/Force Awakens

Watch the Last Jedi and Force Awakens trailers side by side for Star Wars teaser symmetry


It's like poetry, so that they rhyme
Apr 16
// Hubert Vigilla
The first trailer for Star Wars: The Last Jedi brought the hype. There's some beautiful imagery as Rey trains with Luke Skywalker; ditto when those landspeeders leave brilliant red smoke in their wake while racing across a de...
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Jude Law is young Dumbledore in Fantastic Beasts sequel


Well, Jude is a Fantastic Beast...
Apr 14
// Rick Lash
  Yesterday, news broke that Jude Law will portray Albus Dumbledore, beloved character and Headmaster of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, in the sequel to 2016's Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. Fantas...
Last Jedi photo
Dark. Light. So much more.
We're going to get a lot of Star Wars trailers in the coming years. In fact we've had plenty just off of the first two Disney released films, and yet the second that theme kicks in I get excited like its the first time a...

Coming to America photo
Coming to America

Coming to America 2 gets original's screenwriters


This doesn't make it good
Apr 14
// Matthew Razak
What... Why... The Coming to America sequel might make the least sense of all sequels ever, but it's happening. The Tracking Board has confirmed that Paramount is mounting the Eddie Murphy led sequel and has pulled in th...
Transformers 5 photo
Transformers 5

New Transformers: The Last Knight trailer is incomprehensible yet mesmerizing nonsense


A Michael Bay fever dream
Apr 12
// Hubert Vigilla
The trailers for Transformers: The Last Knight have been absolutely daft. It's like Michael Bay has turned over his toy box and made big battles out of whatever action figures fell out. Now, this sounds great in theory--it's ...
Carrie Fisher Star Wars 9 photo
Carrie Fisher Star Wars 9

Carrie Fisher will appear in Star Wars Episode IX without using CG doubles


Additional footage is the key
Apr 10
// Hubert Vigilla
After the death of Carrie Fisher late last year, people wondered whether or not she would appear in Star Wars Episode IX. Given how certain actors were recreated with CG in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, there was some specula...
Planet of the Apes 3 photo
Planet of the Apes 3

New War for the Planet of the Apes trailer sets up primate revenge and man's last stand


Talking apes? That's bananas!
Mar 30
// Hubert Vigilla
Matt Reeves' War for the Planet of the Apes is just two months away. The movie didn't make our most anticipated movies of 2017, which may have been a mistake on our part, or maybe a sign of general iffiness. Rise of...
Michael Shannon as Cable? photo
Michael Shannon as Cable?

Michael Shannon is the frontrunner to play Cable in Deadpool 2


Michael Shannon should play everyone
Mar 22
// Hubert Vigilla
Logan had a lot going for it. In addition to the pathos of an aged Wolverine, the film featured a surprise promo for Deadpool 2. Now, Deadpool 2 isn't in production yet, but Fox likes money and they want to make more of ...
Avatar 2 delayed photo
Avatar 2 delayed

Avatar 2 delayed because of 3 other Avatar sequels that will never get made at this rate


Let it go, James
Mar 17
// Hubert Vigilla
Avatar 2 is delayed. This is not a repeat from 2016. It is also not a repeat from 2015. The theme for the 2018 Avatar 2 delay will be "Under the Sea". With this many delays, I swear James Cameron is secretly making a Don Quix...

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