NYCC: Marvel announces Ant-Man & The Wasp, due out in 2018

Two releases are shuffled to accommodate
Oct 08
// Matt Liparota
This summer's Ant-Man was apparently enough of a hit to justify a follow-up, because a sequel – Ant-Man & The Wasp – is due out July 2018, Marvel and Disney announced today at New York Comic-Con. Not much else...
Prometheus 2 photo
Prometheus 2

Prometheus sequel gets new, Alien friendly title

Sep 25
// Nick Valdez
Despite the two hour confusing slog it was, Prometheus was divisive here at Flixist. We even pulled in Jim Sterling at one point to talk about it because it was so crazy. I'm sure Ridley Scott was interested in pursuing a seq...
Spectre photo

Listen to Sam Smith's Spectre theme, "Writing's on the Wall"

Sep 25
// Nick Valdez
"Skyfall" > "You Know My Name" > "Another Way to Die" > "Writing's On the Wall" 
Fast and Furious photo
People don't want money
When Furious 7 turned into a massive hit we all probably thought that James Wan would be back to direct for Furious 8, but after the truly stressful shooting thanks to Paul Walker's untimely death the director was allowe...

Minority Report Pilot Review: It's Basically Already Canceled

Sep 22 // Nick Valdez
Taking place ten years after the events of Steven Spielberg's Minority Report (which the pilot has to remind folks existed) and the end of the PreCrime Unit (where the police arrested folks based on murders that hadn't yet happened), one of the "Precognitives" Dash (Stark Sands) has grown tired of hiding as his murder visions grew worse and worse. He eventually teams up with Detective Lara Vega (Meagan Good of Cousin Skeeter fame)  and their adventures in policing begin or something like that.  Pilots are under an extreme amount of pressure. They've got to hook their respective viewers within the first fifteen minutes or so while showing why the world they inhabit is worth investing in. Report actually accomplishes this pretty well. The opener follows Dash as he frantically dashes toward the scene of a crime while showing off the pilot's impressive budget (which I don't expect to hold weight through the rest of the series, much like Almost Human). It's a subtle and intelligent sequence as Dash struggles knowing the entire time he'll fail. But there's never any hand holding during this, and we're left to infer it from his actions. And when he does indeed fail to stop the murder, it's as simple as watching him turn away from the scene since he's witnessed so much of it already. Unfortunately, that same light touch doesn't extend past that point. After the first ten or some minutes, Report basically becomes every cop show ever. I don't really understand why, but for some reason Report constantly exposits story details. Lines like "They remind you of having no parents, that's why you came to me." or along those lines. It loses that subtlety in favor in overtly stating how other characters relate to other ones, and it's not like those relationships are particularly inventive either. You'd figure with a world 50 years in the future, the future police would have better conversations than "I'm a future police." That's not really what they say, but I hope you get my point. I guess I'm still sour about Almost Human. That show had a much better handled premise. It's not all bad as there are a few nuggets that might prove interesting later, but this pilot had a ton of rough edges. Normally I'd say to forgive a pilot's bad writing if the cast or premise were gripping enough, but I don't feel that way here. I'd love for Meagan Good to have a great starring vehicle, but since she yet again plays second fiddle to some white guy, I'm over it.  Either way you fall on this, Fox will cancel this after the first season...if it even gets to that point.  Final Thoughts:  Meagan Good is great, but I wish the pilot exploited her body less. It really undermines how good of a detective she is when we're all ogling a picture of her in a bikini.  We're all lucky I didn't use "Meagan Bad"  Wilmer Valderama is here. That's all I have to say about that.  "When I was your age, we used this thing called Tinder. It's how I met your father." I don't care what year it is, no one ever will refer to Iggy Azalea's "Trouble" as an "oldie."  I totally believe The Simpsons will still be on the air 50 years from now. 
Minority Report photo
I miss Almost Human
As television grows more and more influential thanks to its ready availability through streaming services, networks have been putting more and more money and effort into their offerings. One of the weird consequences of this ...

Nope photo

Sex in the City 3 isn't happening

Wait, we thought it was?
Sep 21
// Matthew Razak
According to people who pay attention to such things -- really not sure who that is -- there as a rumor that Sex in the City 3 was a thing that was going to happen. This despite the fact that the second movie was horribl...
Tran5mers photo

Michael Bay and Mark Wahlberg probably returning for Transformers 5

Sep 18
// Nick Valdez
Along with news of an animated Transformers spin-off, some other news sprouted out of Paramount's weird writer's workshop which Paramount paid somewhere along seven figures to construct. The writers included (Zak Penn (T...
New Creed trailer photo
New Creed trailer

New trailer for Creed fleshes out the drama between Adonis and Rocky

You gotta know your chicken
Sep 17
// Hubert Vigilla
The first trailer for Creed showed a whole lot of promise. Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone) has become a new Mickey and Adonis Creed (Michael B. Jordan) is a hungry newcomer to the ring. This second trailer for Creed reveals...
Pacific Rim 2 delayed photo
Too bad, Mako!
If you were holding out hope for Pacific Rim 2, we've got some bad news for you today. The Hollywood Reporter ran a piece about the current testy relationship between Legendary Pictures and Universal, and one of the casualtie...

Allegiant Trailer photo
Allegiant Trailer

First trailer for The Divergent Series: Allegiant exists

Sep 16
// Nick Valdez
The worst criticism I can give a film (which my roommate hates) is when I say a film just "exists." By that, I usually mean the film isn't good or bad enough to warrant an actual opinion. Through my tenure here I've been expo...
Mary Poppins reboot photo
Mary Poppins reboot

Disney rebooting Mary Poppins, going to need lots of sugar

Sep 15
// Hubert Vigilla
Have you been clamoring for a Mary Poppins sequel? No? Well, too bad. Disney is rebooting Mary Poppins with Into the Woods director Rob Marshall at the helm, The film will take place 20 years after the original movie, and wil...

Simon Kineberg really focused on making Fantastic Four 2 not suck

Good luck, sir
Sep 14
// Matthew Razak
We all know that Fantastic Four sucked, right? No point in beating that dead horse. Well, other than the fact that it's fun. It really sucked. The films writer/producer, Simon Kineberg, is still super excited about makin...
Texas Chainsaw photo
Texas Chainsaw

First Leatherface poster as needless as film

Who cares where he came from?
Sep 08
// Matthew Razak
Will Lionsgate ever stop beating this dead horse? They've been desperately trying to make Texas Chainsaw Massacre happen and it just isn't going to happen. They're once again rebooting the franchise in case you hadn't he...
Captain America Civil War photo
Marvel's Team Edward vs. Team Jacob
Somehow there is no superhero movie scheduled to be released until Deadpool in February 2016 and the legal thriller Superman v Batman: Dawn of Justice in March 2016. The next MCU movie slated is Captain America: Civil Wa...

Review: Hitman: Agent 47

Aug 19 // Nick Valdez
[embed]219790:42560:0[/embed] Hitman: Agent 47Director: Aleksander BachRated: RRelease Date: August 21, 2015 Based on IO-Interactive's Hitman series, Agent 47 follows Katia (Hannah Ware) a woman with mysterious heightened skills searching for her father, a man who once ran a covert government (which government? Who cares!) experiment that lead to the creation of super soldiers with highly advanced tactical skills known as "Agents." When Agent 47 (Rupert Friend) claims he's trying to help save Katia and her father from Syndicate agent John Smith (Zachary Quinto), she doesn't know who to believe and must decide whether or not to rely on her mysterious abilities to survive. As you can probably gauge from the synopsis, 47 is as generic as they come. It's a trite plot that doesn't waste time with intricacies or honest characterization. But in the same vein, the flow of the film benefits from the lack of plot or heavy knowledge of the characters. For example, Rupert Friend is "fine" as Agent 47. The film specifically doesn't ask much more of him than to be an emotionless blank slate, but it's strangely never boring. It adds an interesting air of sterility to the film that pushes all of the violence of the film into hilarious territory (since the grit stands out so much). When you watch a guy listlessly kill a guy with a bible while a techno-metal soundtrack blares in the background, you can't help but laugh.  It's almost as if the film is trying to replicate the videogame series in that sense. By having a blank slate as the main character, 47 is trying its best to capture the feeling of experiencing the beats of the story through a direct avatar. It doesn't always work since cinema fundamentally can't connect with an audience at such a base level, but that's why 47 makes the inspired decision to choose a different main character. Rather than follow the blank slate, we're supposed to care about Katia. While that doesn't quite work either since she eventually collapses into the violent world of the film, it allows 47 to be "inhuman" for a bit and lets the audience enjoy how ridiculous the film's world is. It's a near perfect action formula which almost feels nostalgic in the way it wants us to just enjoy this guy shooting other guys.  Evidence of this is 47's fantastically storyboarded opening. With airs of Terminator, two agents follow Katia. The "inhuman" 47 does this awesome slow walk (but thanks to his emotionless state, the film believes in its audience enough to infer that he's walking with pompous confidence), while Quinto's John Smith has this awesome Kyle Reese vibe. Then they fight on the subway tracks and the film becomes a cartoon. It's pretty awesome. To explain why it turns into Terminator would give away the fun of the opening, but it really isn't a big twist if you've seen these films before. Although the plot is generic, Agent 47 does whatever it can to make everything else super fun: action sequences are faithful to the videogames as 47 uses the environment around him to take down a room, the bad dialogue makes the banter between the action hilarious, and the soundtrack seems overbearing at first but eventually subsides.  I'm left wondering whether or not I was "supposed" to enjoy Hitman: Agent 47 in the way I did. The film begs the question of whether or not we're "supposed" to laugh with it or at it. After writing my thoughts down here, I think it's a little bit of both columns. Hitman: Agent 47 is full of intentional goofy choices in order to keep the film fresh. Unlike films that try and be a bad movie in order to reach a cult status, 47 doesn't care whether or not you're going to watch it later. It's invested in keeping you entertained now and doesn't care whether or not you're invested back.  While Hitman: Agent 47 is too generic of an action film for pure action fans, it's got enough flair to appease casual fans of its namesake. It's got bad dialogue, bland characters, but it's so brisk only some of that matters. Hitman: Agent 47 hits its target well enough I'd be interested in seeing what another of these can bring. 
Agent 47 Review photo
A near hit, man
Despite never quite getting a videogame adaptation right, studios are still trying to churn out film after film in order to hit that elusive sweet spot where they please both new audiences and fans of the original videogame. ...

Colin Trevorrow Directing Star Wars Episode IX: Continuing the Indie-to-Blockbuster Director Trend

Aug 17 // Hubert Vigilla
[embed]219786:42556:0[/embed] I feel sort of bad bringing up Josh Trank, but it's necessary. Trank was attached to direct a standalone Star Wars film until a few months ago. Trank says he voluntarily left Star Wars so he could pursue a small, original project away from public scrutiny. Speculation among film journos (notably The Hollywood Reporter) is that Trank was fired from the gig, partly due to clashes with Fantastic Four screenwriter Simon Kinberg, though largely due to unprofessional behavior. Kinberg is an executive producer on Star Wars: Rebels and wrote the Star Wars spin-off film that Trank was supposed to direct. (Oddly, Kinberg hasn't caught that much grief for writing Fantastic Four.) There have been multiple reports on Trank's troubled Fantastic Four production. New stories of on-set chaos cropped up in the recent issue of Entertainment Weekly, one of which alleges that Trank and actor Miles Teller almost came to blows. Fox bears a lot of the blame for the fiasco behind the scenes of Fantastic Four, but Trank's got to wear the movie as an albatross for the rest of his career (or what's left of it). While Trank's first journey into blockbuster filmmaking feels like a cautionary tale, Trevorrow's been extremely fortunate by contrast. Jurassic World has earned $1.6 billion worldwide, making it the third highest-grossing movie of all time. Now he's doing Star Wars. If Trank really was ousted because of his difficulties mounting a big film, this might be considered a vote of confidence in Trevorrow's skills with large-scale storytelling and an agreeable temperament for tent-pole filmmaking. While I've been noticing more and more indie directors being promoted to major films, this leap from indie-to-tent-pole isn't unprecedented. The Wachowskis went from the low-budget noir of Bound to The Matrix, Christopher Nolan went from moody character-driven dramas to Batman Begins. Rian Johnson, who's directing Star Wars Episode VIII, also fits in this tradition, and ditto Guardians of the Galaxy director James Gunn. As much as some people clamor for big names on big movies, sometimes the big movies are a type of proving ground for new names or filmmakers who've distinguished themselves working on a smaller scale. (Think of Sam Raimi when he came to Spider-Man.) Then again, there's a cynical take on signing indie directors to blockbusters. Studios hire young, hungry filmmakers to become journeymen or journeywomen rather than directors with a distinct sensibility. Their job, in short, is to do the studio's bidding. I wonder how much Marc Webb fits that description, having gone from (500) Days of Summer to the two ill-fated Amazing Spider-Man films for Sony. Jon Watts, the director of the recent indie thriller Cop Car, has been tapped to helm the reboot of Spider-Man for the Marvel Cinematic Universe--it's only his third film. And of course, directors with more clout or a particular style often clash with studios over vision. In the MCU alone (which seems to be run more by Kevin Feige than any individual directors), Joss Whedon felt broken by compromises he made while doing Avengers: Age of Ultron, Edgar Wright left Ant-Man over creative difference, and Selma director Ava DuVernay declined Black Panther since she wouldn't have enough control over the character or the project. (Think of Sam Raimi when he made Spider-Man 3.) Trevorrow's hire may be a sign of the MCU model being used for these Star Wars films, with Lucasfilm president and producer Kathleen Kennedy serving as the new trilogy's unifying voice. Kennedy may be the key creative force behind the scenes, guiding a shared vision, molding the new Star Wars universe through her hiring choices and years of experience in the industry. (Kennedy, in an interesting coincidence, was attached as a producer to the fourth Jurassic Park film until 2013, which is when she took the reins of Star Wars for Disney.) This is just speculation for now, but we should have a better understanding of how the new Star Wars series is being crafted in the next few months. As for Trevorrow, we'll find out how he does on Star Wars Episode IX in December 2019.
Star Wars Trevorrow photo
The Tale of Trevorrow and Trank
In addition to news about Star Wars: Rogue One and an exclusive Drew Struzan poster for Star Wars: The Force Awakens, it was announced at D23 that Colin Trevorrow would be directing Star Wars Episode IX. Trevorrow's two other...

Star Wars 7 Runtime photo
Star Wars 7 Runtime

The D23 poster for Star Wars: The Force Awakens and news on runtime

Official one sheet this poster is not
Aug 17
// Hubert Vigilla
There were plenty of major Star Wars announcements at D23 over the weekend. We got a glimpse of the Star Wars: Rogue One cast, for instance, which will star Felicity Jones, Diego Luna, Ben Mendelsohn, Forrest Whittaker, Donni...

Toy Story 4 plot details are worrisome

Gotta have faith
Aug 14
// Matthew Razak
After Toy Story 3 landed I promised I would never doubt Pixar again unless it involved automobiles, but they are making it hard. Good Morning America revealed our first plot details for Toy Story 4 and they seem a b...

New photos from Star Wars: The Force Awakens and plot/character details emerge

Aug 12 // Hubert Vigilla
Abrams also revealed/confirmed a few things about villain Kylo Ren, the fella with the lightsaber that has the crossbar on it (causing many geeks consternation regarding its dangerously impractical design). Not only is his lightsaber homemade, but he's also part of a mysterious group known as the Knights of Ren, a new addition to the Jedi/Sith mythos. From the article: Abrams can confirm what many suspected: it’s a tool he crafted all by his lonesome. “The lightsaber is something that he built himself, and is as dangerous and as fierce and as ragged as the character,” Abrams says. ... But there’s another wrinkle to Kylo Ren. In typical Abrams fashion, the more the filmmaker reveals… the more questions arise. It turns out — Kylo Ren isn’t the character’s real name. Or, at least, not the name he was born with. Remember how we eventually learned that “Darth” is not a first name, but a kind of title? It appears the surname “Ren” is something similar. “He is a character who came to the name Kylo Ren when he joined a group called the Knights of Ren,” Abrams says. But that’s as far as the writer-director will go. Check out the image gallery, comment on Kylo Ren and the Knights of Ren, and just hold onto your butts until December. [via EW, EW, and EW]
Star Wars 7 Photos photo
Begun the hype machine has
As its December 18th release date inches closer, we're starting to get more and more stuff to whet people's appetites for Star Wars: The Force Awakens. There was the Korean TV spot for The Force Awakens the other day (with ma...


Fox (probably) still plans to do Fantastic Four 2 for some reason

Rights, mainly
Aug 12
// Matt Liparota
Last week, Fox's latest take on Marvel's Fantastic Four hit theaters to meager box office and much fanfare – the overwhelming majority of it negative. The unmitigated crappiness of Fantastic Four kept the Internet Hot T...
The Purge 3  photo
The Purge 3

Frank Grillo teases a 'politically charged' Purge 3

#CrimeDay, #CrimeDeux, and #CrimeTrois
Aug 11
// Nick Valdez
Back before The Purge: Anarchy released, I was one of the loudest voices against it. While The Purge had a neat idea, it squandered it on a simple home invasion movie. We even started the #CrimeDay game on our old podcast and...
Star Wars TV spot photo
Star Wars TV spot

See new Star Wars: The Force Awakens footage in this Korean TV spot

Reminds me: I ❤ Korean food, movies too
Aug 10
// Hubert Vigilla
It's been a while since we've seen some new stuff from Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens. Leave it to an international TV spot from Korea to give us something new and pretty darn striking as well. A Millennium Falcon ...
2oolander photo
Water is the essence of wetness...
We've known about Zoolander 2 for quite some time, but after its cool release date announcement we never got a look at the film until now. This brief teaser is all too brief since it doesn't give us a look at the actual film...

Review: Vacation

Jul 30 // Matthew Razak
VacationDirectors: John Francis Daley, Jonathan M. GoldsteinRated: RRelease Date: July 29, 2015 [embed]219710:42514:0[/embed] First off lets give props where props are due. New Line could have geared this film for a PG-13 rating to pull in more people, but they didn't (as Hemsworth's wang below shows). They kept it R like the original and for that they should be applauded because the R-rated comedy is a dying breed. It was a signal that the this new Vacation might just pull itself up by its own boot straps and be funny. The signal got a little diluted. The movie picks up years after the original films. Rusty (Ed Helms) is all grown up, and even more out of touch with his own family than his dad was. His wife, Debbie (Christina Applegate) and kids James (Skyler Gisondo) and Kevin (Steele Stebbins) hate the normal cabin vacation they go on so Rusty decides he'll pack everyone into a car and recreate his family's trip to Wally World. That one went pretty poorly as we all may remember, but they're doing it again. In fairness the film is blatantly forward about the fact that it's a remake and that takes some of the sting out of the copped comedy from the original. There is something refreshingly old school about Vacation's comedy. It feels a bit out of date in its gross out site gags and senseless punchlines. Honestly, it's a bit refreshing in a land of comedies that take themselves too seriously or have forgotten how to properly kick a guy in the nuts for comic effect. Slapstick is a sadly dying art. The problem is that Vacation doesn't really execute its slapstick that well. There are definitely moments when the movie pulls off some solid comedy, but it too often feels forced. The film constantly seems to want to push boundaries with its comedy, but never checks to see if that boundary is worth breaking. The movie works here and there, but never long enough to make it any good. James and Kevin's relationship is actually pretty funny, but it pounds the same joke into the ground for far too long. Helms delivers a solidly oblivious father, but the family relations never feel real thanks to how dumb he is. You never get the connection you got with Chevy Chase's increasingly grumpy Clark Griswold. And not that continuity is something you'd expect in this case, but it's very unclear how the Rusty of the original films turned into the Rusty of this film. Chevy Chase and Beverly D'Angelo's cameo is also horribly wasted making the connections to the original feel more like a cash grab than actual care. The biggest problem, however, is when Vacation goes way beyond where it should. It mocks murder, suicide and sexual abuse of a minor. I'm all for comedy being allowed to make fun of disturbing subjects; it's one of the ways we cope. The problem is when that comedy isn't funny. Vacations jokes in these departments fall horrendously flat meaning they're both offensive and unfunny. They're clearly trying to make themselves edgy, but they stink at doing it. It pushes the old school comedy into the background and turns the film into something more akin to a Scary Movie sequel. Vacation is a movie that no one wanted so its hard to say that it's a major disappointment. It can actually be funny at times, especially thanks the Helms being a funny person, but it's mostly just retreaded jokes and poorly delivered gross out comedy. The vacation from Vacation films really shouldn't have ended. 
Vacation Review photo
Vacation, all I never wanted
National Lampoon's Vacation is a comedy landmark. A boundary pushing bit of hilarity that stands the test of time and spawned two sequels funnier than the original (and Vegas Vacation). Of course National Lampoon has bee...

Dreams photo

Edge of Tomorrow 2 being pitched by Tom Cruise

Live. Die. Repeat... again
Jul 29
// Matthew Razak
Without a doubt one of my favorite films of last year was Edge of Tomorrow (also known as Live. Die. Repeat.) It was a sleeper hit and delivered one of the more original sci-fi films we'd seen in a while. While the film'...
BvS Trailer photo
...and Wonder Woman!
I've been cautiously optimistic for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. There's lots to like (cool outfits, there's a great cast, the plot sounds like it fixes Man of Steel's biggest problem) and lots not to like (it looks li...

Ash Vs. Evil Dead Tailer photo
Bruce Campbell's still bad-Ash *rimshot*
The first full trailer for Starz's Ash vs. Evil Dead is out, and it looks way better than it has any right to look. Bruce Campbell is back as Ash, and they're playing up his schlubbiness, age, and cult persona to great effect...

Batffleck photo

Ben Affleck and Geoff Johns are working together on the next solo Batman film

Affleck to direct and write Affleck
Jul 10
// Nick Valdez
I'm guessing that before Ben Affleck agreed to appear as Batman in the upcoming Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice one of the stipulations was that he'd get to direct one of WB/DC's next films. Either that or Warner Bros just...
Alvin 4 Trailer photo
Alvin 4 Trailer

First official trailer for Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip

Jul 08
// Nick Valdez
While you're waiting for next iteration of The Smurfs, Get Smurfy, there's another long running film series based off a popular old cartoon, Alvin and the Chipmunks. Their fourth (!) film, The Road Chip, takes the show on the...
IDR photo

Independence Day: Resurgence teaser from Jeff Goldblum

Well, ah, this is how they tease movies
Jul 07
// Matthew Razak
For some reason I am stupidly excited for Independence Day: Resurgence. Maybe it's just some wanton nostalgia, but I just feel like it's going to be good despite the fact that it's a remake to a decades old film and these thi...

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